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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HP Horror
A good collection of six H. P. Lovecraft stories - "The Dunwich Horror", "The Dreams in the Witch House", "The Lurking Fear", "The Thing on the Doorstep", "Hypnos" and "The Outsider" (presented in this order) - which have received varying critical responses. "Dunwich" and "Outsider", the latter of which has been described as Lovecraft's best story, are among those...
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dull & dated
I know there are many people who enjoy Lovecraft's writing but it wasn't my cup of tea at all. I won't bother with any more of his work.
Published on 9 Nov. 2012 by Ian White


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HP Horror, 18 Sept. 2013
A good collection of six H. P. Lovecraft stories - "The Dunwich Horror", "The Dreams in the Witch House", "The Lurking Fear", "The Thing on the Doorstep", "Hypnos" and "The Outsider" (presented in this order) - which have received varying critical responses. "Dunwich" and "Outsider", the latter of which has been described as Lovecraft's best story, are among those generally accepted as his greatest, while "Witch House" and "Doorstep", both late period Lovecraft, are less well-regarded. (Critic Lin Carter called "Doorstep" a "sordid little domestic tragedy", and "Witch House" "singularly one-dimensional, curiously unsatisfying.") Ironically, these stories are two of my favourites in this collection. "Doorstep" is perhaps the most plot-driven story here, and those who've read The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, Lovecraft's posthumously published novel, may recognise its themes and characterisations. It's about a young scholar and his strange new wife, whose personality overwhelms his. "Witch House" is a delightfully grim story which showcases Lovecraft's gift for mixing horror and sci-fi tropes. On the one hand you have a haggard old witch and her rat familiar, but on the other there's strange alien landscapes populated by cosmic races. The plot follows a student obsessed with the legend of a Salem witch who vanished from her cell.

The most poignant and well-written tale, however, is "The Outsider"; told solely in monologue, it gives us a nameless, faceless character who, raised in darkness, discovers his true nature. This is a very short story which is wrought like a tiny diamond; bold, complete and beautiful, almost a poem. Though ostensibly supernatural, it can be used as a metaphor for anyone who's ever felt like an outsider, alone and cut off from the party. It can be applied, in fact, to Lovecraft's own life; as a young man he lived hermetically for several years, speaking to no-one but his mother. "Hypnos", rightly placed in this book just before "The Outsider", is also a very short story told without dialogue by a nameless figure. Using obscure drugs he explores, with a mysterious man he met at a train station, realms normally hidden from human consciousness. Naturally, this leads to mayhem and madness. The story is named after the Roman personification of sleep, sleep being what our narrator now fears.

"The Dunwich Horror" opens beautifully, with a lengthy evocation of the Gothic Dunwich, a New England town populated by a people who've slipped into rural decadence. A sense of strange mystery then envelops as its main characters, Old Whately and his bastard grandson Wilbur, are introduced. Together they perform dark rituals, while Wilbur mentally and physically matures at an unnatural pace. The story loses steam towards the end when a protagonist, Dr. Armitage, turns up to thwart the nominal horror and a standard action climax develops, but it's mostly thrilling. "The Lurking Fear" takes the form of a classic ghost story, centring on a haunted mansion - once home to an eccentric Dutch family - from which a monster is said by locals to depart on stormy nights, devouring their neighbours. The mystery's solution, however, is more Darwinistically cynical. I defy anyone of sensitive mind not to be chilled by this tale's existential conclusion.

Lovecraft's dominant themes and tropes are present here: scholarly heroes, cosmic villains, human decadence, and the folly of man's curiosity. In Lovecraft's world, the cosmic explorer faces death at best and mind-shattering terror at worst. If the Mayans taught us to study the stars, Lovecraft taught us not to wonder about what lies beyond them.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars inspired, 13 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: "The Dunwich Horror" and Others (Hardcover)
Not only is Lovecraft the orignal master of the horror genre, to my mind he is among the greatest authors of all time. I can't explain quite how appealing his work is, but among other characteristics it is his style of thoroughness. He never leaves a loose end or an unexplained point. His is methodical and full. A writer really in touch with his imagination, his work comes across with the feel of an unlimited universe to which the reader is invited, if they dare. I go back to his stories over and over again.
Many critics talk of his early death and connect it with his imagination and an all too real link with the dark world about which he writes...maybe so, maybe not. But for sure his death was all too early because I believe his best was yet to come. You will not be dissapointed with this work whether or not you are a fan of horror or just a fan of good writing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What you cannot see can hurt you, 6 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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We are introduced to a Massachusetts backwater-community where families are inbred and may have spawned wizards. A strange and very ugly young man is trying to obtain a rare unabridged Latin version of the Necronomicon for what looks like a nefarious project. Something smells funny about his place.

I never saw the movie. However I was surprised at the how well this book is written by the inverter of modern horror. Originally published in the summer of 1926 however it is a timeless tale about being your brother's keeper.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What you cannot see can hurt you, 4 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dunwich Horror (Paperback)
We are introduced to a Massachusetts backwater-community where families are inbred and may have spawned wizards. A strange and very ugly young man is trying to obtain a rare unabridged Latin version of the Necronomicon for what looks like a nefarious project. Something smells funny about his place.

I never saw the movie. However I was surprised at the how well this book is written by the inverter of modern horror. Originally published in the summer of 1926 however it is a timeless tale about being your brother's keeper.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Page Turner Entertainment, 29 Oct. 2011
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Andy Vizor (Torquay England) - See all my reviews
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Despite enjoying being immersed in this swampy horror I did miss the lack of any solid character portrait to empathise with.Though only having read a couple of his stories,the other being At The Mountains Of Madness,it seems typical of his style to tell the story in a cold fashion,describing the terror of a character as only a matter of fact and not with any particular sympathy towards that character.If you intend reading Lovecraft as I do,or at least his best rated stories then I suggest reading Michel Houellebecq's biography on him to make things more interesting.It also gives you a list of 8 must reads of Lovecraft. I reckon it is going to be a richly entertaining reading experience to temporarily wallow in the mire of his created horror tales,after,say,...er,..shopping at Tescos.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very good. How words on a paper can create the ..., 23 Aug. 2014
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Mr. AJ Harrison "Bundi School" (Middlesbrough, England) - See all my reviews
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Very scary. Very good. How words on a paper can create the fear factory that HP Lovecraft does i'll never know. A disturbing mind that creates the best horror fiction ever.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dull & dated, 9 Nov. 2012
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I know there are many people who enjoy Lovecraft's writing but it wasn't my cup of tea at all. I won't bother with any more of his work.
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"The Dunwich Horror" and Others
"The Dunwich Horror" and Others by H. P. Lovecraft (Hardcover - 1 Oct. 1984)
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