Customer Reviews


23 Reviews
5 star:
 (12)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thumbs Up!
This story is entirely in black and white with simple outline drawings. Like the early episodes of the Simpsons, characters are recognisable but the style is still forming and growing. Tintin has a much rounder head and there is less definition in the character's features. However, the simplistic method and the monochrome texture means you don't stop to admire the view...
Published on 19 Oct. 2012 by 365 Graphic Novels

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tintin's first and rather anomalous adventure.
The oldest of the Tintin adventure to be published in full 'book' form (originally referred to as 'albums'), In The Land Of The Soviets remains even more anomalous than In the Congo, for several reasons. First of all it was never deemed worthy of a redraw, which might've truncated it to the normal length and format all the other Tintin albums share (62 colour pages). At...
Published on 30 Nov. 2012 by Sebastian Palmer


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thumbs Up!, 19 Oct. 2012
This story is entirely in black and white with simple outline drawings. Like the early episodes of the Simpsons, characters are recognisable but the style is still forming and growing. Tintin has a much rounder head and there is less definition in the character's features. However, the simplistic method and the monochrome texture means you don't stop to admire the view and are whisked along by the story.

It was originally a newspaper comic strip so the regular cliff-hangers mean that Tintin is getting shot at, blown-up, or in car crashes every other page. Whilst this gets a bit fatiguing after a while it means the story moves along at a fair old pace. You won't get bored and can finish the book very quickly.

Herge wrote this in 1929 meaning the politics are just as black and white as the pictures. The Soviets are evil. Like the Nazis in Indiana Jones they have no redeeming features. This conjures the feel of an old Saturday Morning serial like Flash Gordon or Buck Rogers. Much of the humour wouldn't look out of place in a Charlie Chaplin movie either. This is definitely a fascinating snapshot of a bygone era and quite an accomplishment for a 22 year old amateur with no formal art training. Whilst the English translation can sometimes get a bit patchy it is still an interesting read.

Thumbs Up!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


99 of 109 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Actually you should probably read the first Tintin tale last, 7 Jan. 2004
By 
Lawrance Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
The value of "Tintin au Pays des Soviets" ("Tintin in the Land of the Soviets") is as much historical as it is literary since this is the first of Les Aventures de Tintin created by Hergé. The date is January 10, 1929 and in Brussels the intrepid young reporter for "Le Petit Vingtième" Tintin and his dog Milou board a train for Moscow. There Tintin spends his time denouncing the methods of the Communist Party and then avoiding attempts by the Soviet secret police to silence him for his views. By the time Tintin makes it back home word of his exploits has arrived ahead of him and he is greeted as a hero.
Today "Tintin au Pays des Soviets" constitutes something of a false start for Hergé's series. The seven volume collection of the Three-in-One series of "The Adventures of Tintin," which is probably the most common way for today's readers to get a hold of the Tintin stories, begins with the third adventures, "Tintin Au America." Both this story and "Tintin Au Congo" are left out of the "official" canon, the former because of the suspect ideology and the latter because of the implicit racism. What emerges in the other eighteen Tintin tales is more pure storytelling that takes place in a created world that bears only an allegorical relationship to the real world. Besides, Tintin does not even have his trademark tuft of hair at this point.
Consequently, Tintin fans who track down the first couple of adventures will need to take both tales with a grain of salt. Whereas the other stories tend to stand on their own, the first two are clearly dated. "Tintin au Pays des Soviets" especially requires commentary or annotation that reveals exactly what was going on in the Soviet Union in the late 1920s that Hergé and the left found necessary to attack, even in a comic book adventure. I know that Hergé was working for "Le Petit Vingtième," an anti-Communist church-run newspaper, but I also know that he also apologized for this book later in life because he had never actually visited the Soviet Union and had based his story on one book, which was apparently written for propaganda purposes.
Consequently, it is fairly safe to say that this particular Tintin adventure is really not intended for children until they are old enough to understand the politics of the time in which it was written. It might be ironic that you should read the first couple of Tintin adventures after you have read the other eighteen, but that is probably the best way to proceed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tintin's first and rather anomalous adventure., 30 Nov. 2012
By 
Sebastian Palmer "sebuteo" (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The oldest of the Tintin adventure to be published in full 'book' form (originally referred to as 'albums'), In The Land Of The Soviets remains even more anomalous than In the Congo, for several reasons. First of all it was never deemed worthy of a redraw, which might've truncated it to the normal length and format all the other Tintin albums share (62 colour pages). At 141 black and white pages, it remains an oddity, even in purely technical terms.

But as a story, and as a work of art, it also differs markedly. Rather than hearing Hergé's voice, which only really comes through in the gentler humour (in itself mostly rather lame on this occasion, and also often anything but gentle: along with In The Congo, In The Land Of The Soviets finds Tintin at his most brutal), we are served up an indigestible dose of heavy handed anti-Communist propaganda: he's certainly the 'company man' at this point, doing the bidding of his Catholic employers. After this story, only his adventure in the Congo makes explicit reference to the paper - Le Petit Vingtieme - for whom Tintin is allegedly a reporter. In fact In The Land Of The Soviets is also one of the very few Tintin adventures in which we ever see him writing up a report to send back to the paper.

In addition to all of this, Hergé's craft is very much in its infancy, which makes In The Land Of The Soviets an interesting rather than particularly satisfying document. The drawing, dialogue, and storytelling are all, by Hergé's own later standards, really very poor. In fact one of the most noticeable shifts in the whole catalogue of his Tintin work is the almost quantum leap between this and In The Congo, especially in terms of the artwork, but also in most other respects. Some aspects, such as the smoothing out of the episodic structures that originated with the serial format, would take longer to iron out and improve. But there are precious few hints - some gags that will be recycled later, the odd well composed frame, or series of frames - of what might come later. On the evidence of this adventure alone one would hardly predict the great lifetime achievement that Hergé in fact went on to.

Even more of a one-for-the-fans curio than In The Congo, but perhaps less so than the unfinished Alph-Art, as other reviewers point out this would not be a recommended starting point for those coming fresh to Tintin. Even Tintin's character differs from what it was to become, with him being less innocent and more thuggish, only Snowy resembling his character as it would (more or less) remain in future. So, although it was, in book form adventure terms, where the much loved reporter and his dog started out, I wouldn't recommend any reader started here.

Still, for Tintin nuts like me, and there are clearly a great number of us out there, this is nonetheless essential.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for Tintin fans!!!, 8 Jun. 2004
This review is from: Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
This book is essential for anyone who likes Tintin. Its always interesting to see how a character begins and this is no exception, including how Tintin got his hairstyle. Its also different to see the pages in black and white only, while Snowy looks a little bit different in Land of the Soviets, compared to future stories.
While this is almost double the price of other Tintin books, it is worth it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For the fans, 21 Feb. 2015
By 
Biff - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Adventures of Tintin) (Hardcover)
Fans and collectors will love this. It has to be in their collection.

Those with a casual interest in Tintin may be disappointed - black and white throughout and not particulaly well drawn in my opinion. Its more of an interesting look at the early work of Herge.

It is hardback but the pages do tend to yellow quite quickly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intresting historical perspective, 28 Oct. 2005
By A Customer
The book is valuable for two reasons, firstly it is interesting to compare how TinTin developed over the years, and secoundly for anyone with an interest in Soviet history, how the orginal stories in Le Soir (belgium newspaper)in the 1930's and the book, were and still are, portrayed by some as mere anti communist propoganda.

It is chilling that despite millions of people being murdered in Gulags or shot out of hand, that the book which falls short of showing the full horrors of lenin and Stalin regimes are still derided in this way.

Anyway once again a good book, but for some the biggest critism is that boy dectective might have got too close to the real world in his first outing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good - but remember it was written for children., 2 Feb. 2015
By 
Paul Marks - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A good story - and one that shows that Herge was not taken in by the propaganda defending the oppressive Soviet regime in the 1920s. But remember this was intended for children - it is not a modern "graphic novel".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin I love it, 9 Jan. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Tintin is just getting started. He's been read by generations but he's been rediscovered. Don't miss out, he's a cracking good read
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tintin- Mission in Moscow, 18 Mar. 2000
By A Customer
Read it! If you are a true Tintin fan, I say read it! Even though the book is in a different format to the well known Tintin books (this is in black and white, no colour at all), a true Tintin fan will realise its significance at once. It is the first Tintin book, written in 1929, making it 71 years old to date.
The story concentrates on Tintin, a yound reporter and his dog, Snowy (who seems to be a little TOO know-it-all and obnoxious in this book) travelling to Russia, to report on the situation there. The Soviets are determined to stop them ever reaching Russia- Tintin's train carriage is even blown up by a bomb when he is in it! Soviets try at every chance they get to stop him, and this can sometimes lead to brilliant sequences in the book. My own personal favourite runs from page 57 to page 62. Tintin and Snowy are in a car, and a mechanic lights the dripping petrol from the car, and it's a race against time-will Tintin escape the burning petrol, or will he be blown SKY HIGH? I won't tell you the result, because I'm SURE the good people at Amazon wouldn't want me to tell you the story, because there wouldn't be any point you buying the book, would there? (Needless to say the book runs until page 141, so...)
Tintin gets up to all sorts of escapades, including carving a propeller and piloting the plane through a storm, stealing a police boat (tut tut- Tintin, you bad boy) from under the policeman's nose (tut tut- Policeman, you silly boy) and crashing a car into the front of a train, and... well, I won't tell you any more, in case Amazon and the publishers get mad with me, so, I will end with my opening phrase... Read it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars NOT recommended- by far the worst Tin Tin ever, 6 April 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
To begin with, I love Tin Tin. I'm a big fan of him. His stories are engraved in my mind, since I was very young. Having read all his adventures several times, I must say that "Soviets" is very different from his other adventures as though it has been written by another author! It is hard to believe that it came from the same man!
Definitely, one of the author's lesser works.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Adventures of Tintin)
Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Adventures of Tintin) by Georges Remi Herge (Hardcover - 31 Mar. 2003)
Used & New from: £22.00
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews