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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Women, Love, Life...Bukowski Style!,
For those of you who are interested in the writings of one of the best modern American writers, Bukowski is your only choice. This, much like all of Bukowski's books, is almost entirely auto-biographical. The name is Henry Chinaski, he was a postman, he was a gambler, and now he focuses on his lovelife in WOMEN.
It's hard to get into the actual content of this book...
Published on 26 Mar 2004

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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sorry Buko but a bit... boring
I popped my Bukowski cherry with Post Office and was enthralled, and my enchantment lasted through Ham on Rye, his short story collections, Pulp and some poetry collections. Most recently I read the excellent biography Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life. It's not like I am unfamiliar with the themes and style of Mr B is what I'm saying. But Women really...
Published on 26 Sep 2007 by S. J. Lynch


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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Women, Love, Life...Bukowski Style!,, 26 Mar 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
For those of you who are interested in the writings of one of the best modern American writers, Bukowski is your only choice. This, much like all of Bukowski's books, is almost entirely auto-biographical. The name is Henry Chinaski, he was a postman, he was a gambler, and now he focuses on his lovelife in WOMEN.
It's hard to get into the actual content of this book because Bukowski's books don't follow plotlines and simple three act structures. This book is simply an incredibly detailed look into Bukowski's relationships with women. From a woman who is loaded with cash to a nymphomaniac who is very violent, to a woman that has his child and then ...I'll let you get to that.
He gives very intimate and explicit accounts of experience as well as his inability to maintain a regular relationship with a female. Critics view this as bad writing, but I find it to be a very good account of the human condition, the inability of many to remain monogamous and the attempts by many to change the people the love, or at least claim to love. This a great book. I agree with another reviewer who also recommended THE LOSERS' CLUB by Richard Perez. These 2 books are my favorite recent Amazon purchases!
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sorry Buko but a bit... boring, 26 Sep 2007
By 
S. J. Lynch "srhjn" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
I popped my Bukowski cherry with Post Office and was enthralled, and my enchantment lasted through Ham on Rye, his short story collections, Pulp and some poetry collections. Most recently I read the excellent biography Charles Bukowski: Locked in the Arms of a Crazy Life. It's not like I am unfamiliar with the themes and style of Mr B is what I'm saying. But Women really turned me off. It's the emptiness I guess. Even in Post Office, even when he's at his lowest ebb, there's a vitality there which crackles and a tenderness, a human quality which is touching. That is absent in Women, and the drunk but interesting Chinaski is now the drunk but boring man you wish would go away and stop droning on. Same same same. Also the sheer amount of conquests is unbelievable. Maybe some women are drawn to fat ugly men with good legs, a jaded world view and serious drink problem. Even the lack of respect he habitually shows for most of these women is shallow and so unbelievable (though the women most of the time don't set themselves up for respect). It's like my uncle trying to be sexy and cool (no offence uncle m!) and failing miserably. There is no depth to any of it, no passion, no truth (and as a poet you need truth), no insight. I'm constantly reminded of a grumpy old man who wrinkles his nose at dirt and wishes to keep his hands clean - a trouser folder. This is especially true after reading the biography and accessing a clearer picture of the real Bukowski.
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32 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Really Made Me Laugh, 28 July 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
Women by Charles Bukowski is definitely a book worth owning, if you don't mind the kind of book that is often a little vulgar, raw, and yes "real." The story revolves, of course, around Buk's relationships with women, and the accounts themselves are totally hilarious and side-splitting. It's also one of those rare accounts of a man "past his prime" taking a final stab at the game of romance. It starts out with an account of Chinaski admitting he's a "loser." Dig this: "I was 50 years old and hadn't been to bed with a woman for four years...the idea of having a relationship with a woman -- even on non-sexual terms -- was beyond my imagination." Right then, from page one, I was hooked. The book then proceeds to show his disastrous attempts at altering this situation -- and the results are just hilarious! And it's the humor that makes this novel work. Next to The Losers Club by Richard Perez, which is also about relationships and the humiliation of daily life, Women by Charles Bukowski is by far the most fun I've had reading this year! Buy it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars His most debauched work., 9 Sep 2014
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
Not his finest moment, but still a page turning exercise in excessive madness. Bukowski lurches into depravity too often, describing his antics in lurid detail, but there's a poignant loneliness and sadness hanging over every occasion. However, this doesn't mean the book had to be so pointlessly long. This is a novella at best, and it barely develops on the excellent Post Office or Factotum.

Worth it for Bukowski fans, but if you're new to his work head to Ham On Rye or Factotum/Post Office.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genius, 29 May 2010
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
Bukowski is the greatest writer of all time and this is probably his best book. The writing is raw, sparse and hits the perfect note. Above all, it is utterly hilarious. Told in the form of a diary, this book doesn't need a well thought out plot, it simply lets you into the life of a drunk, dirty old man with an amazing gift for witty observations and pitch-perfect comic timing. You get the sense that his life is like this before the book started and it will continue when the book has finished - Bukowski has simply let the reader into a time when he was doing alright for himself.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brutally honest, sparklingly witty., 2 Aug 2001
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
The thing with Bukowski is, if you don't get him, you're never going to get him. If you don't know whether or not he's going to be your cup of tea, then read Women. This is vintage Bukowski, an uncompromising, warts 'n' all account of his drunken, womanising life, and a shot across the bows of the pretentious, Men are from Mars-esque books that have become so fashionable over recent years. This doesn't tell you how things should be; it tells it precisely how it is. Women: read this only if you want a gritty, no-holds-barred insight into the workings of the male mind, behind all the polite facade and new-man bulls**t. Men: read this only if you are prepared to identify with many character traits of somebody who, at the end of the day, treated women like dirt. You will read it again, and again, and again.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Drunken Clouseau, 15 April 2013
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
This is the first Bukowski that I've read, apart from a few of his poems, and I loved it from the first sentence. It deals with the later years of his life (in the guise of Henry Chinaski, his literary alter-ego), by which time he has become a successful and sought-after writer, poet and literary circuit speaker. Success hasn't spoiled him, however; he still sleeps til midday and spends the rest of the day, and most of the night, drinking. He still chases women of every variety with every opportunity that presents itself; and, unlike Henry Miller (whose writing his closely resembles), he doesn't take himself too seriously.

There is scarcely any visible form to the book (there are chapters, but one gets the impression that they divide hangovers rather than elements of the book), just a continuous ramble about who he's sleeping with, who he wants to sleep with, what he's drinking, and who he has to put up with in order to bed the next woman in his sights - in fact, in this stream-of-consciousness respect it reminded me very much of "How late it was, how late", by James Kelman. The most consistent strand lies in his on-off relationship with "Lydia", his sculptress-poet sometime girlfriend (based on the real-life on-off girlfriend Linda King), who has the disconcerting habit of trying to kill him every time she suspects him of infidelity, which is most of the time. At periodic intervals throughout the book she suddenly jumps out from the undergrowth or blasts out of a door, tries to stab him, shoot him through the window, run him down on the sidewalk or beat his brains out, a Cato banshee to his drunken Clouseau.

Never a dull moment with Chinaski. Feminists will hate it. I loved it.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You can always count on Bukowski, 28 Aug 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
I have never been let down by a Charles Bukowski novel. I only wish that I had "discovered" his writing earlier on. Sure, his books are always about drinking and women, but he consistently manages to stay fresh. Along with Bert Rinehart's "a.k.a. Dorothy Drab," I would have to say that this is the best book I've read in a couple of years. I look forward to re-reading it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars it's funny, and indeed it's very funny, 11 May 2010
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
This is...

... appears to be Charles Bukowski's alter ego - Henry Chinowski's autobiographical account of a short period in his hedonistic life.

It's not clear how much of this maps onto Bukowski's own autobiography, but I suppose it is set in the the 1970's, and Bukowski's photo portraits do suggest that he lived a hard life ... I think the strongest evidence is that this book is so funny. I don't believe you can write such funny stuff, unless you've lived at least part of it, even if you do embellish it a little.

Anyway, this book is about Chinowski, his series of women, his alcoholism and touches a little on his poetry performances. He does seem to get through his fair share of beautiful and willing young women; he does seem to have more than his fair share of hangovers, and he punctuates these with sporadic poetry readings, which appear to give him opportunity to line himself up with the next beautiful and willing young woman.

This should make it sound like a series of events in the stream-of-thought genre of novel-writing, which is what it is. Bukowski is self-aware enough to paint in the flaws (his own flaws we think?) of a self-absorbed artist and the dysfunction of the life, giving the pathos to what could be interpreted as meaningless and plot-less diary-keeping. However as I've said, it's funny, and indeed it's very funny. Recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great gift for a Bukowski fan, 15 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Women (Paperback)
Bought this book as a gift for my sister at Christmas and she was very pleased with it. Familiar with Bukowski's poetry she wanted to read one of his novels to see what they are like. She has told me that despite the gritty descriptions of a complex life and at times traumatic memories in this semi-autobiographical story, she was impressed with the easy way in which it reads and how it gives an insight in to the life of Bukowski and the other characters featured.

So if you know a Bukowski fan and they don't have this book I can recommend it as a gift that they may enjoy.
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