Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful book of poetry, 23 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Clouds Should Know Me By Now: Buddhist Poet Monks of China (Paperback)
Wisdom Publications has done it again: another lovely book that brings out the best in an Eastern tradition. The tradition this time is the poetry of Chinese Buddhist monks, and in this volume there are a number of moving and sublime examples of their craft. The poems are presented with visual elegance and an unobtrusive scholarship that makes the volume even more noteworthy. My only objection stems from the organization of the book, wherein six different contributors each choose a poet or group of poets to translate and present. I am not knowledgable enough to know whether it is the fault of the original poets or that of the translators, but the poems in one section really fall flat, and another section is also somewhat below the high state of excellence achieved by the others. But really, this is a minor complaint. The vast majority of these poems will appeal greatly to those who are attracted to this sort of poetry, and the volume over all is very pleasing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Millenium of Buddhist Poetry, 18 Dec 2008
By 
Howard Mitchell (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Clouds Should Know Me By Now: Buddhist Poet Monks of China (Paperback)
`The Clouds Should Know Me By Now' is a collection of poems by 14 Chinese Buddhist monks and their fellow travellers - Chia Tao seems to have abandoned being a monk in favour of writing poetry - dating from the late eighth century to the early twentieth, each translated by a different author. The book follows the usual format of an introductory essay putting each poet in context, the poems themselves with their Chinese characters, and short sections of notes, invaluable as the poems often refer to Chinese geography, politics or Buddhist history.

My personal favourite from the collection is Wen Chao's `Hearing the Gibbons Call in Pa Gorge' translated by Paul Hansen:

As I lean
On my oar, gazing
At the cloud-line, purity
Emerges, deep and lonely,
From the Gorge.

When the mind
Doesn't have anything
On it, there's no sorrow
Inherent in repeated calls. They bear
The dew where every peak is distant,
Dangle in space where a slice
Of Moon shines
Bright.

Whoever
Hears it like this
Can finish a poem
By dawn.

With six translators and poets spanning such a time period the poetry itself is varied but common themes and the Buddhist world-view come through clearly. There is a brief introduction, which to my mind is parochially written for an American audience, but the poems themselves are a joy to read and ponder. Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A cathartic read, 24 Mar 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Clouds Should Know Me By Now: Buddhist Poet Monks of China (Paperback)
This book is a real revelation for me. The poems are profound at times, and extremely calming. I love to think of these monks so many centuries ago. It is also pleasing to have the chinese script alongside it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Clouds Should Know Me By Now: Buddhist Poet Monks of China
Used & New from: 3.69
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews