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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic
I came across this omnibus version of the two first Discworld novels while searching for The Colour of Magic at my local bookstore. I am very glad I got this particular version, because you really need to read both novels to conclude the story about Rincewind and Twoflower. It took me a while to get into the story, but once I did I really enjoyed it. It is very funny, but...
Published on 17 May 2008 by O Gardener

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hard to get into
To begin with this book was hard to get into. There are no chapters as such. The book jumps about so time, place and people get confused. By the end I did really enjoy the book but it was just too much hard work to keep track of what was going on for my liking. Also the book is tiny and the writing is right up to the spine so really awkward to read too.
Published on 10 Sep 2010 by L. Roberts


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Colour of Magic and the Light Fantastic, 17 May 2008
I came across this omnibus version of the two first Discworld novels while searching for The Colour of Magic at my local bookstore. I am very glad I got this particular version, because you really need to read both novels to conclude the story about Rincewind and Twoflower. It took me a while to get into the story, but once I did I really enjoyed it. It is very funny, but at times also a bit dramatic. Now I cannot wait for The Colour of Magic to be released on DVD!
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69 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extremely readable fun!, 10 Nov 2002
I started this book having only read one other book by Terry Pratchett - I was kind of working my way up to reading the massive Discworld Series, so I started with The Carpet People (also a great book) in the summer, which I loved. So, out of curiosity at all the Discworld hype, I got hold of a copy of The Colour of Magic and started reading (despite various people advising me that reading them in order was not necessary).
I'm glad I did - I can't say I was an avid reader of the book straight from the start, but it soon became that way. I loved the characters in this book - Twoflower, Rincewind and Death in particular had me in stitches - and the setting, a flat, disc-shaped world carried on the backs of four giant elephants etc etc, and the amount of creativity with which Pratchett crafted his world, had me captivated.
I have now finished The Colour of Magic and The Light Fantastic, the sequel, having read them one after another. Although standing alone they are fantastic books, treating them as one book is probably a good idea, going by the cliffhanger ending of The Colour of Magic.
I would recommend this book to any fans of The Carpet People and other books by Terry Pratchett. It's a great book, so anybody else: read it!
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107 of 116 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The first Discworld novel!, 29 Jun 2003
By 
Cammy (Aberdeenshire, UK) - See all my reviews
The Colour of Magic (this book) is the first in the phenonemonly successful "Discworld" series by humour and fantasy British author Terry Pratchett. Well, this was not the first discworld book I read. The first one I read was "Sourcery". I thought it was far too weird, so I left it for a while, but then tried "Witches Abroad" and loved that. I read some more after that and was hooked on the discworld collection. It's strange, they say "Never Judge A Book By It's Cover", but it was the covers of the books that drew me in on that rainy afternoon in the school library. Sorry, I forgot to mention, I'm only 13. But don't go away! Stay and read this!(and remember to say that this review was helpful!!)
But back to the book. The Colour of Magic begins by explaining what the Discworld actually is. For those of you who don't know, it's actually a huge plate that is supported by 5 elephants that are supported by a huge turtle, known as the Great A'tuin. Yep. That fact that the world (in the book) is a disc is obviously like how our ancestors thought the world was flat.
We are introduced to our main characters, who are Rincewind the inept and cowardly wizard, Twoflower, a short tourist with (judging by the front cover) four eyes, and a chest that has hundreds of little legs and a mind of it's own, known as "the Luggage". There are of course more characters, like Hrun the (don't say this to him) barbarian and the wonderful talking corpse. At first the characters spend time in a bar in the twin city of Ankh Morpork, where Twoflower's money seems to be worth more than he thinks in Ankh. They soon leave Ankh Morpork, find themselves in a magic temple in which you mustn't say "eight", riding on dragons that only exist if you believe in them and of course, talking to a troll made of water at the Edge of the planet.
Believe me, it's ridiculous and unconventional, but you will find yourself chuckling at the brilliant dialogue and zany descriptions that only could come from Terry Pratchett.
How does it compare with the others in the series? Well, I've always liked Rincewind and I think this is one of the best adventures with him in it. I think the Luggage is brilliant also.
The characters are about the most important thing in the Pratchetts, and the witches are my favourite characters along with Death, and so my favourite books are Mort and Witches Abroad, so if you like rincewind, you'll like this. This one I felt had a bit more as far as the plot went, rather than a series of jokes like some of his later ones are like.
Recommended fully, and remember to read "The Light Fantastic" which comes afterwards.
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72 of 78 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Have you forgotten how good it is?, 12 Aug 2004
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Having read the entire series of 30-odd Discworld novel's in publication order over the past 16-odd years, I decided it was time to revisit the first novel in the series. Would it really be as good as I remembered, or would it seem inferior compared to those later Discworld novels?
The Discworld of The Colour of Magic certainly feels like a different place to Pratchett's more recent offerings, but it's certainly not inferior. Nowadays Pratchett seems to use the Discworld as a distorted mirror of our own world, with allusions to real world politics and problems - in comparison the Discworld of The Colour of Magic is a simple (but effective) satire on the typical post-Tolkien Fantasy genre. This first novel introduces the long-running characters of the inept wizard Rincewind and the oddly anthropomorphic Death (what no Librarian? - my memory must have cheated), and uses the device of Rincewind having to protect gullible tourist Twoflower as a means of providing a brief tour of the Discworld. The novel is set out as four linked short story's: in The Colour of Magic Twoflower manages to burn the city of Ankh-Morpork to the ground by the introduction of insurance; The Sending of Eight adds Conan rip-off Hrun the Barbarian in a typical Dungeons & Dragons quest to destroy a Lovecraftian monster and capture some treasure; The Lure of the Wrym introduces an upside down mountain and dragons who only exist if you believe in them; while Close to the Edge finds Rincewind and Twoflower getting caught up in a mission to voyage over the edge of the Discworld itself (a theme Pratchett would return to years later in The Last Hero). Yes, it's a lot shallower than later Discworld outings, but it's also a lot funnier, and the Discworld is a much more fantastic place. And how could I forget such insanity as Rincewind suddenly finding himself transported onto a terrorist hijacked plane in our reality?
If you're a potential new Discworld reader looking at the mass of novels and wondering where on earth to start, then this first novel is still the best introduction. And if you're a long-term Discworld fan - have you forgotten how good it is?
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How is this book 21 years old?, 19 Oct 2006
By 
T Marshall (Hampshire) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Whenever the latest Pratchett discworld novel comes out I tend to get it, read it in one thoroughly enjoyable day, then stick it on the bookshelf with the others.

Last week for some unknown reason I thought I would re-read the original for the first time in years, as it's not too long and I had a spare couple of hours.

Imagine then my delight that it still crackles with intent through every page. We are taught the background knowledge that makes the rest of the series so brilliant. We are introduced to only a couple of characters that last the distance through the series; Rincewind the Wizzard and DEATH. Yet, the feel of the city of Ahnk Morpork proves to be the main character and is perfect from the word go.

I cannot understand how much moral courage it must have taken to leave the plot until "The Light Fantastic"; the books sequel. I don't get a lot of the sci-fi references throughout the book (my father-in-law reads a lot of Anne McCaffrey and reckons Pratchett is spot on with the dragons and suchlike). Finally I don't understand how anyone with a sense of humour would not enjoy reading this.

It is simply a great little book which leads you gently into the discworld with little fanfare or fuss. The trouble is you might find, like me, that decades later you are still trying to get out of the place.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where it all starts!, 27 Nov 2004
From habit, I like to read series books in order so I started at 'Colour of Magic'. I bought the book rather the borrowed it.
COM is broken up into 4 novelettes. The story is about Rincewind, a cowardly, inept and absolutely endearing character; Twoflower (who is a 'Tourist' - some oddity never before seen on the Disc); and, The Luggage who's a forceful character in it's own rights.
The three of them travel through various places of fantasy on the disc, meeting odd people as they go along.
I must admit the beginning was confusing and difficult to get into since I was yet unaccustomed to Pratchett's writing style. But since I'd paid for the book, I kept to it. Thank Gods I did!
The actual plot is very typical-adventure-fantasy. The settings and stereotypes like the 'hero','scantily-clad heroine' or 'inverse mountain' were all a bit too unnessesarily typical of a fantasy novel. In the later books, Pratchett manages to steer into a genre of his own.
However, what makes this book so fantastic is the characters and their interaction with each other. Rincewind and Twoflower simply bring out the best in each other and their contrasting personalities (pessimist vs. optimist) blend wonderfully. The Luggage adds an extra zing to their relationships.
Evidence of Pratchett's genius is already present. With Twoflower being a tourist, we as readers explore the Disc with him. The tourist representations are hilarious.
I believe that people will only really appreciate this book if they read it before the others. The future novels all feature a better-developed Discworld and readers who turn to COM or The Light Fantastic after those would miss the familiarity.
I truly think that although COM lacks much in direct comparison with some of the later Discworld novels, this is an unfair comparison because COM is different and shows a raw and less developed Discworld. I still think it's one of the best in its own league. It fetches 4/5 stars rather than 5 only because The Light Fantastic (its follow up) tops it by having the slight, extra touch that COM lacked.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hard to get into, 10 Sep 2010
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To begin with this book was hard to get into. There are no chapters as such. The book jumps about so time, place and people get confused. By the end I did really enjoy the book but it was just too much hard work to keep track of what was going on for my liking. Also the book is tiny and the writing is right up to the spine so really awkward to read too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a brilliant book for fantasy lovers or for anyone., 13 Dec 1998
By A Customer
This book is brilliant. I love it because of the really funny situations the characters get into and the sheer unbeleivable aspect to it. Who would have thought a book about a flat world on the back of a giant turtle would be so good and seem to make absolute sense in the book?. I think you should just read it and not analyse it too closely, then you'll see how funny it really is.I recommend getting "the colour of magic" and "light fantastic" together as they follow each other closely and if you don't you'll be wanting to know what happens for a long time. Definitely read this first if you're new to the discworld novels. it's brilliant.If you're unsure about this book I'm telling you now that if you like a laugh and a good read this is your man but if you like reading dictionaries or something I think the use of sentences would throw you a bit. P.S if anyone who has read this book and has also read "equal rites" sees this please tell me how "equal rites" compares. thanks
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What took me so long?, 19 Nov 2006
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For many years I have seen Terry Pratchett's books in stores and never felt the slightest inclination to read one - dismissing them as "not my sort of thing".

Well just shows how wrong you can be !

I bought this book (and Equal Rites the next one in the series) and I read them both back to back in less than a week. I have since bought another 6 and I am delighted to say that there are lots more of Mr P's books for me to look forward to.

Just a word of caution though, once you start there is no going back so don't blame me if you end up ordering every book in the series!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very clever silliness, 17 May 2005
By 
A. Wasenczuk "speedbird2" (Hampshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is Pratchett's first novel and my personal favourite. Why? Because this is the one in which he takes a pop at the entire fantasy genre. The style of humour is Douglas Adams (with a nod to Tom Sharpe in the character of Rincewind) but the target is different. Like Adams, Pratchett has many imitators but this is the original and the best.
Pratchett's world is a flat disc on the back of four elephants standing on an enormous turtle, swimming between the stars. It's populated almost entirely by magicians, peasants, armed lunatics and petty deities. If you're in the 90% of the population who think that this sounds like a recipe for disaster, then you'll love it.
The trick, I think, is that the best jokes are quite subtle. Some of them you might not notice the first time round. And Pratchett is one of the few authors who can write a sight-gag. For this we must applaud him.
Belly-laughs for all ages. Occasionally, days later in the middle of the high street.
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The Colour of Magic (Discworld Novels)
The Colour of Magic (Discworld Novels) by Terry Pratchett (Hardcover - Nov 1989)
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