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VINE VOICEon 17 June 2013
This the latest version, the first was in 1977. It has all the latest developments and many of the plans which enable the enthusiast to check out where they are on their journey.

What is surprising is the vast amount of freight facilities that exist and the large number of Civil Engineer sidings in all sorts of odd corners. As it states in the introduction the amount of rail development over the next twenty years or so in the UK is probably at an all time high in the last 150 years!

It is compact enough to carry round, with enlarged areas where there area lot of lines. I note it also includes Ireland these days as well.

It does not have historic information but a copy of Cobb's Historical Atlas fulfills that need but is hardly portable!

On the back it says "essential reference for both enthusiast and professionals" and I agree.
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on 9 July 2013
I've reviewed previous releases of the atlas and despite using it as my rail bible, it's still dotted with errors. Someone's already mentioned the HS2 omission, and other lines, as I've alluded to before, like the Ilford 'down avoider' are STILL shown as passenger carrying some 17 years after the last diagrammed passenger trains ran that way. So it's a good, handy book to use as a general guide to what's out there, but don't scratch too far below the surface or you will encounter mistakes. None are killer errors for the general populace, but I'm assuming the target market is a bit more specialist, and like me, they do pick up on these things! It's a shame the author doesn't read reviews like this as if he did he'd improve the atlas no end. A quick one liner in the authors favour - I think the late arrival of the book was due to illness, so if that's the case I hope he's fully recovered
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on 28 June 2013
It's a shame about many of the mistakes in this book, sometimes quite silly mistakes such as wrong colours.
But never mind about those, these are the best books for small pocket sized maps
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on 13 September 2013
The Maps, whilst clear, are cluttered byinserts from other pages. There are no overlaps, some lines appear to have milaege missing between pages, and it is almost impossible to calculate the distance between ajacent Stations which are on different pages. - Disappointing,
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on 28 June 2013
Having bought the "Baker" atlases since no.1 in 1977 its a case of keeping up the collection. Although full of updates and changes showing the current railway network and extensions in the build or planning stage there are the usual glaring errors that seem to perpetuate from previous editions. An example would be the carriage sidings shown at Tonbridge on page 12 beside the Hastings line these were removed nearly 20 years ago or Shewalton Tip on page 77 that went nearly 12 years ago. I can understand recent changes slipping through but not long standing ones. Minor discrepancies you might well say but in a reference books of this nature appealing to the Rail Enthusiast market it just appears sloppy. The definitive work in the railway mapping field is undoubtedly the Quail Map Co. / Track Maps regional books but these are diagrammatic where as the "Baker Rail Atlas" has always been based on geographical maps so fills a market need. I would still recommend the book to friends but feel the people compiling the book should pay more attention to detail in the future and thus avoid needless mistakes.
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on 20 September 2013
I have purchased this atlas about five times since it started being produced.
It gives me exactly the information I want without going into too much detail about track layouts around junctions etc.
The maps are up to date.
It also includes routes for projects in the pipeline, for example HS2.
Well worth the money.
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on 1 July 2014
This new edition shows a lot of the hoped-for new developments in the British and Irish railways systems, which is very useful, but how many of them will materiaize on the ground remains to be seen. I remember after world war 2 the maps of the London underground system showed lines that were never built.
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on 1 July 2013
This book is very detailed, and will be most informative for when my wife and I embark upon our planned railway tours.
Excellent value; it was also delivered very promptly.
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on 21 July 2013
Even has HS2, including connections to existing lines. I have been buying these ever since first edition, and the cartography is always that little bit better each time.
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on 29 November 2013
Updated version of Rail Atlas. I travel quite a lot with private rail, (SRPS) and use the atlas as a guide to where i have and have not been. This atlas is excellent.
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