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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Murderin' bampots...
This is the second in Ferris' Douglas Brodie series which started as a Kindle sensation with The Hanging Shed. Tartan Noir at its finest, putting Brodie's Glasgow right up beside Rebus' Edinburgh.

Brodie is now working as a crime journalist in Glasgow when a spate of vigilante attacks hits the city. At the same time, his colleague, senior reporter Wullie...
Published on 1 April 2012 by FictionFan

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing follow up to The Hanging Shed
This book features the character Douglas Brodie who was first introduced in the author's previous book, `The Hanging Shed'. I read and enjoyed the previous book, but not this one. It started fairly well but lost direction mid-way through. From that point the storyline was dragged out and I found it hard work to finish the book.

There are many references to The...
Published 20 months ago by Al


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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Murderin' bampots..., 1 April 2012
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FictionFan (Kirkintilloch, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This is the second in Ferris' Douglas Brodie series which started as a Kindle sensation with The Hanging Shed. Tartan Noir at its finest, putting Brodie's Glasgow right up beside Rebus' Edinburgh.

Brodie is now working as a crime journalist in Glasgow when a spate of vigilante attacks hits the city. At the same time, his colleague, senior reporter Wullie McAllister is covering the murder of a councillor and suspects corruption at the heart of Glasgow Corporation. Brodie's relationship with Sam Campbell is still on-off as she struggles to get over the after-effects of their last adventure.

Ferris doesn't stint on violence and gore as the attacks and murders mount up and in true thriller style the climax is explosive. But along the way we are treated to some great humour, much of it very black. However the thing that makes these books really stand out is Ferris' descriptions of post-war Glasgow (Brodie has only recently returned to Glasgow after serving as a major in the Second World War) and his completely authentic use of Glasgow slang. No psychopathic killers here - these men are murderin' bampots. I'm not old enough to remember Glasgow in the forties, but the language and attitudes of the characters chime in with my own memories of how people of my parents' generation talked and felt. The locations are so accurately described they whisk me back in time, though some of the places still exist today. The Horseshoe Bar, for instance, is still a thriving institution. Ferris writes so well that you never get the impression he's researched the period - you feel certain he must actually have lived in it.

In my view, Ferris is the most exciting new Scottish crime writer on the scene and in Brodie he has developed an attractive, compelling lead character whose second outing is even better than the first. Highly recommended.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing follow up to The Hanging Shed, 10 Nov 2012
By 
Al (Farnborough, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book features the character Douglas Brodie who was first introduced in the author's previous book, `The Hanging Shed'. I read and enjoyed the previous book, but not this one. It started fairly well but lost direction mid-way through. From that point the storyline was dragged out and I found it hard work to finish the book.

There are many references to The Hanging Shed and although this book could be read as a standalone novel, you may find these continual references to the previous story annoying, especially if you haven't read it. Reading this book first would also mean you wouldn't want to subsequently read the previous one as you would have a good idea of the plot, including how it ends.

The storyline is quite unbelievable. Brodie is supposed to be a war hero, so you would expect him to be able to look after himself, but the way that professional killers fail to kill him at least twice in this book is ridiculous. A number of other aspects of the storyline defy belief.

The storyline is also very predictable with no twists or surprises as it drags along to its inevitable conclusion.

The book ends with a "shoot `em up" gunfight but even that failed to raise interest levels for me as it dragged on page after page. Again, the outcome was difficult to believe. The Hanging Shed ended in a similar way; for me there was a definite feeling of deja-vu throughout the last 100 or so pages of this book.

I found this book a big disappointment as I though The Hanging Shed showed a lot of potential but the author has failed to further develop the characters or come up with a convincing storyline to follow it up.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 9 Jun 2012
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Really enjoyed this from start to finish. Great to have a book set in and around the streets you know. His writing style rolls along, excellent characterisation also. Have read all the Ferris books and really enjoyed them all - I also liked the reference early in this one where Brodie asks about his old colleague, Danny McCrae. It reminded me of the way Michael Connelly has linked his characters into and through his books. Read it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars He gets better and better, 13 April 2012
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I got Gordon Ferris's new novel the day it came out and it was worth 2 nights without sleep! A really gripping, exciting and thought-provoking novel. I loved 'The Hanging Shed' but 'Bitter Water' is even better. What sets Ferris apart from other 'crime' writers is his willingness to take on very difficult subjects and difficult characters - we have a pretty reliable narrator but he's running away from something... the war? a relationship? his past? (something murky there??)

Ferris is a literary novelist pushing the crime genre, who just gets more interesting, the more he writes. I am already looking forward to the next installment but meanwhile I will have to be stafsfied re-reading this and his earlier Danny novels. Small spoiler: Danny is mentioned in this book as an old friend of Brodie's but does not appear.... surely in the next one! Please!

Thank you for another superb novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When are they making the film?........, 6 May 2012
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I read The Hanging Shed in three days, Bitter Water has taken me slightly longer but it was gripping.

I have to confess to living up the road from Douglas Brodie's Mum's house and can picture it so I loved his visits there, especially when he took the rather posh Samantha home with him.

As with the previous book, this one had twists and turns in the plot which had me wanting to keep reading , long after I should have put it down and got on with something else.

It's a Glasgow before my time, but I could picture the scenes. Brodie is not afraid to step into the dark side of the city to get his story - no matter what the danger to himself. And when they involved those he loved......................fireworks!!

Can't wait for the sequel to see if Brodie and Samantha carry on as they are or take their relationship a step further.

More please!!!!!!

And the reason for the title is that I think it would make a fantastic film, but please can they cast a real Scottish actress as his Mum, as I would hate to see her played by someone who didn't understand the character. I still know women like his Mum. You don't mess with them!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The rising star of crime writing, 24 April 2012
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Fresh from his triumph with The Hanging Shed, Gordon Ferris brings Douglas Brodie back for another highly-charged and atmospheric yarn. Brodie is an ex-cop, returned from fighting in WWII to pursue a new career as a crime reporter in Glasgow. He operates in the city's gritty underbelly, starkly captured by Ferris against the backdrop of the 1950 post-war era. It's a tale of vigilantes, violence, humour, and enough twists to make you want to keep moving smartly along. Ferris doesn't pull his punches, round out his vowels, or update the ghetto language in a tale that's as absorbing for its delve into the past as it is for its action and suspense.

This latest addition to the Ferris bookshelf confirms his place as the rising star of crime writing.
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23 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written this is an enthralling thriller, 6 April 2012
It is the summer of 1946 and ex policeman, ex Soldier Douglas Brodie is now working as a journalist for the Glasgow Gazette as understudy to Chief Crime Reporter Wullie McAllister.

The brutal murder of a Town Councillor has Wullie's nose twitching - Wullie is old school heading towards retirement and looking for that one last scoop by which to be remembered.

Accosted by a Highlander who says `call me Ishmael' Brodie is asked to help a man accused of stealing some food. The man like so many other's who fought in the war for king and country, has returned home to ...nothing. No job. No family. No future. Ishmael had heard how along with lawyer Samantha Campbell Brodie had fought for justice for his old friend Hugh Donovan (see The Hanging Shed). And he wants Brodie to obtain justice for Johnson.

With rumours of corruption in local government the people of Glasgow are tired of corrupt officials, so the appearance of a group of vigilantes who start to mete out their own brand of justice, is at first welcomed by the people, pleased to hear that those whom the law has failed to put behind bars are getting their comeuppance, but then things go too far.

Unfortunately, the vigilantes have chosen the Glasgow Gazette to air their views of violence against those they think deserve punishment, and soon Brodie is caught up in a web of deception, as he suspects he knows the identity of the leader of the vigilantes.

Bitter Water, like The Hanging Shed, portrays starkly the post war years, the poverty and shortages, and in many cases little immediate hope of anything better. Beautifully written this is an enthralling thriller, and highly recommended by this reviewer as a book not to be missed.
-----
Lizzie Hayes
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid Scottish Crime, 3 April 2012
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Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
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I love a good crime story and for me some of the grittiest have north of the border as its setting. What Gordon does well in this book is bring together realistic characters (both in the lead and as supporting) who add a real flavour to the story that takes you back to a believable time.

Add to this real gore and people who won't stint to do what they have to which when backed with great prose alongside a solid overall arc, it makes for a book that will stay with you for quite some time. The only other thing I'll say about this book is that it's the second in a series and if you haven't had chance to read the first, don't worry, you can pick this up and still get to enjoy it. Magical.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great follow up, 28 Feb 2014
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Brodie is back and is just as good as his first outing.

This book adds more background to Brodie's war and as before is set against the grimy backdrop of post war Glasgow.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Glasgow gangland post WW 2, 26 Feb 2014
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Not quite as good as the hanging shed , but a fascinating insight into Glasgow immediately post world war 2
. Good characterisation and although a somewhat elabotate plot, it is also believable and reminiscent of the time. These books are different because of the time they were based in, and for me, that is why I find them very interesting and enjoyable.
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Bitter Water (Douglas Brodie)
Bitter Water (Douglas Brodie) by Gordon Ferris (Paperback - 1 Jan 2013)
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