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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, whimsical tour through the natural world
It's a book which is difficult to describe really, the chapters cover all sorts of natural topics, switching from scientific to philosophic to poetic themes. It's a pleasure to read, and you can pick it up at any chapter and indulge yourself for a few minutes, or devour it all in a single sitting, it is after all quite short. There's an optimism in the language used, and...
Published 16 months ago by Liam Nicholson

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7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Really rather annoying....
Amy Leach by all accounts (the jacket blurb anyway), knows a lot about writing, I take it on trust that she knows a bit about the natural world. She certainly has a vivid mind.

Unfortunately for me, the sum was a lot less than the author's parts. This all rather struck me as whimsy for whimsy's sake. Whimsy as a world crops up a lot in other reviews of this...
Published 16 months ago by Mr. C. Davis


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, whimsical tour through the natural world, 11 Jun 2013
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Liam Nicholson (Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Things That Are: Encounters with Plants, Stars and Animals (Hardcover)
It's a book which is difficult to describe really, the chapters cover all sorts of natural topics, switching from scientific to philosophic to poetic themes. It's a pleasure to read, and you can pick it up at any chapter and indulge yourself for a few minutes, or devour it all in a single sitting, it is after all quite short. There's an optimism in the language used, and you feel inspired to explore.

Whilst you will more than likely learn a few things, it's not exactly a scientific study, more an enthusiastic and curious mind's thoughts on what's out there; what we may ignore, or simply not see without going out and taking a moment to appreciate the world. It made me think about a lot of things in entirely new ways.

It's delightful reading, and I noticed myself smiling and chuckling to myself on the odd passage.

Highly recommended for the curious people out there, or anyone wanting an easy yet enlightening non-fiction read.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, unusual book, 16 July 2013
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Beautiful use of language, surreal and whimsical descriptions and concepts. The author clearly loves nature in all its manifestations and delights in word plays and in inventing new ways with language that cannot help but amaze and pull the reader in her fantastical landscapes. A very refreshing and innovative genre. more of the same please.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely Book, 5 Feb 2014
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This review is from: Things That Are: Encounters with Plants, Stars and Animals (Hardcover)
A very though provoking book, very well written and difficult to describe, I'm still thinking about it a couple of weeks latter.
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7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Really rather annoying...., 30 Jun 2013
Amy Leach by all accounts (the jacket blurb anyway), knows a lot about writing, I take it on trust that she knows a bit about the natural world. She certainly has a vivid mind.

Unfortunately for me, the sum was a lot less than the author's parts. This all rather struck me as whimsy for whimsy's sake. Whimsy as a world crops up a lot in other reviews of this book, for many obvious reasons. Take the example sentence: 'translucent yellow fruit and turquoise bird wings and emerald dew-drippy leaves...'. I'm sure lots of readers think this is charming and twee, but for me she might as well be talking about pixies skipping through glades sprinkling magic dust on bunny rabbits. I hate whimsy, particularly when it comes to natural history writing.

Or the term 'They-of-the-incisors' for beavers.... Call it a beaver if its a beaver. Or it's Latin name at a push, but stop with the cartoon cliches please. Nature is red in tooth and claw. I'm not asking for a full on bloodbath when reading about the animal kingdom, but something above fairy tales for adults would have been more appreciated.

Each chapter is too short to go anywhere significant yet so packed with confusing and babyish metaphor as to be indecipherable. Why use 'orange petals' when you can pointlessly pad it out to 'orange flicker-flame petals' eh?

I took to throwing the book across the room in frustration. No way is this going on my bookshelf next to Thoreau, Muir, Mabey.
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