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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr Conn's book
Over the last decade, David Conn has established himself as the pre-eminent journanlist and commentator on football in England. He's exposed countless acts of skuldugery and championed the cause of the silent majority. Raised on football and now forced to consume an expensive diet of hype and badly made replica shirts, his articles and this book are the antidote to all...
Published on 26 Jun 2012 by David J Michael

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not quite what I was hoping for
Being one of the many suffering and miserable City fans over the years, the sudden success with the F.A Cup victory then the unbelievable climax to last seasons Premier League was a massive lift to us all.
The story of that success; Thaskin Shinawatra buying the club, injecting millions that maybe were not his to inject, then the take over by one of the worlds...
Published on 28 Aug 2012 by S. G. Magnus


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3.0 out of 5 stars could of been better, 22 April 2013
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purchased for my husband for christmas, man city mad fan. He was dissapointed with this book to much on the financel side and not enough about the football. He said he could not wait to finish it, hoping it would get better.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read, 30 Jan 2013
By 
atticusfinch1048 - See all my reviews
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This is a great book written by a football journalist who has become something of an expert at finance within the game.

Here Conn looks at the take over of Manchester City in 2008 and how the takeover has takeover has changed in some respects the outlook of the club. How internal attitudes have changed and that they no longer feel down on themselves.

There are some factual errors in the book especially when recalling the 1999 Play Off final win stating that the rain put off a planned victory tour of Manchester - actually none was ever planned especially as the week before the other team in Manchester showed off their treble.

Other than that a great read and a fasinating read about the new ownership of the Club and the plans they have for moving forward. A must for City fans and a book of interest for football fans.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "Richer Than God: Manchester City, Modern Football Growing Up, 18 Jan 2013
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I bought this for my great-nephew for his birthday, so I have no idea what it is like. So when I say "I Love it" it is him speaking! I believe it proved very interesting for a football-lover!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Citeeee, 28 Sep 2012
I enjoyed this book much more than I thought I would. Mainly for two reasons .

Firstly Conn made all sorts of emotional connections with me , as someone perhaps a little bit younger but who lived through some of the dross city served up in the early 80s and beyond. Being a city fan often seemed a chore, I remember the anger I felt as City lost the 1981 cup final , so much so that I quickly turned to itv to check the result was the same on both channels ...and yes it was. However the anger was tinged by the feeling that we'd be back ...I lost my faith well before they were . Conns North manchester was also my playground and so I had a journey back in time.thanks.

The second and more compelling reason to non 40 year old north mancunian city fans is his expert analysis of the clubs financial record. I was expecting the usual bla bla , rich investors ruin the game ..it's not like that. What Conn shows is how the poor governance and venture capitalist attitudes of Swales , Lee and their backers put food and interest payments above the football and the club. They killed it. He is also shrewd enough to detail that without the city councils gift of the east lands stadium no big investor would have come near them. Incidentally if I was a manchester rate payer I'd have some serious questions still .

This book will be a classic primer in football mismanagement for a long time.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Classy examination of the modern football industry, 2 Sep 2012
By 
G. L. Haggett "glynlhaggett" (UK) - See all my reviews
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A worthy addition to the ranks of well-written sporting memoirs, all the better for its author being a lawyer/journalist, with a very easy turn of phrase, who has lost some of his love for the beautiful game at the top level.

In a work which is part autobiography, part polemic, part subjective chronicle of the ups and downs of Manchester City, Conn provides an incisive examination of the way in which football clubs have increasingly turned themselves into out-and-out businesses and does not stint in charting his own progressive disillusion as he came to that realisation in the course of his research into football's often murky financial affairs.

However, this is not the work of a grumpy old man harking back to the good old days; instead, Conn is generous in his understanding of the joy of his fellow Manchester City supporters when they won the Premier League in 2012, and clearly regrets that he no longer has that visceral feeling himself.

His training in the law enables him to unpick complex concepts and his easy to read style will illuminate those concepts for the layman. His examination of the role of Brian Marwood as director of football is an object class in clarity and will enlighten a generation of supporters who are often confused by the structures in the modern game.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Richer Than God: Manchester City, 6 Aug 2012
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This is a well reseached book which outlines the history, development and disasters (of which there have been many in both human and financial terms)of the game of assocation football. It is also a story about the greed and vanity of the owners of the clubs and FA members, many of whom seem to do more for themselves than the development of the game or its supporters.

Having coached junior teams on poor pitches with inadequate facilities I was well aware of the lack of funds at the junior levels and accepted the fact that there was no finacial drip down factor from the mega funds at the top level of the game.It would appear that the beautiful game designed for the working classes was hijacked by people looking to make quick money without the correct goverance from the governing bodies, as most of them had a vested interest in keeping the money for themselves. Although, there have been owners who have given generously to the "clubs they have loved", like Jack Wakler at Blackburn many others have critised players for being greedy when they have been taking money out clubs for their own personal gain.

The insight of the takeover at Manchester City was informative and it would seem on the evidence so far that the new owners are investors rather than asset strippers which is more than can be said for their near neighbours. Although the City owners are using the "brand" for business reasons they at least seem to have a long term objective (at least until 2030)and are investing in the club infrasture and local community unlike many other owners.

I would recommend this book as it is not only informative about the everyday running of football clubs as businesses but David Conn adds grass root personal experinces which most fans and amateur players will relate too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read - But a sad reflection on the beautiful game, 25 July 2012
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I have to confess to being a blue, born in Hulme and going to watch City from a tender age and for only a few bob, so I was bound to enjoy the book. It is well written and often very funny and also very sad. It brought back memories of the sad relegation at the hands of a Liverpool team that weren't even trying, my youngest crying, and so was I. That same lad now 30 with me at City for the final day of last season and such bitter sweet emotions, roller coaster does not fully describe it if you were lucky enough to be there.
However, it was the authors journey and so I felt so sad for him because his work, which I had known about in exposing the 'real' and seedy side of football, had in some way damaged the real bond with his club.
You do NOT have to be a City fan to appreciate his emotions and descriptions, they will be universally the same for every lad who is now a Dad and has followed 'his' team for many years, when reading you can hear the songs, and almost smell the Bovril and pies, but NOT the prawns!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Essential pre season training, 18 July 2012
By 
J. Coulton "Julia Coulton" (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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I admit that I am a proud Manchester City supporter, still relishing the taste of being Premier League Champions at long last, but with many more battle scars from the years of disappointment and failure. And so I was always bound to love this account of my club's history by Guardian journalist David Conn. But this book is much more than a supporter's handbook - it is a serious look at the politics and, perhaps more to the point, the economics behind our beloved beautiful game.

Only Manchester City fans can tell tales quite like this - of the ups and downs we have had in the past couple of decades supporting our glorious club, and Conn, a true blue since boyhood, is very good on the detail, told with humour and heart. The promotions, successive relegations, sell outs, buy outs, stars and flops are all here. Only my club with our famous Joe Royle coined disease, Cityitis, could have made such hard work of things. Conn is very good, for example, on the massive let down that was Franny Lee, who came back like a knight in shining armour as a star of our past, only to sell `our best players to pay for restaurants.' And as someone who was part of the Kippax sit-in to get rid of the hated former Chairman Peter Swales, that particular piece of disloyalty and greed still cuts deep with me.

But Conn is also very concerned with the overtaking of the whole national game, not just Manchester City, by money men who can buy and sell clubs, can load them with debt to finance personal fortunes, and who are collectively raising ticket prices and ruining its soul, for this author at any rate. It is very well written and well argued. And with the tragedy of Rangers unbelievably unravelling not so far away over the border, it could not be timelier.

Conn is one of those City supporters who lost their way and stopped believing religiously in their club, as these changes in the game occurred. This is perhaps understandable for a journalist who has to cultivate an altogether more dispassionate viewpoint. I wish all our clubs could be collectively and communally owned like in Germany or the mighty Barcelona, but they are not and I cannot see that happening any time soon. So I am not sorry that my club has been bought by a rich sheik - and I defy football fan of other clubs in our position to spurn the riches, and yes the success, which we enjoy now (although of course many say they would).

And although I have never stopped believing, and still get the same buzz out of the roar of the crowd at the Etihad as I did when I first went to Maine Road over twenty years ago, this is still a book to really appreciate. Obviously it will appeal to City fans, but I do hope that other people concerned about the future of football, and its place in the fabric of our society, will read it too. Now roll on the start of the season...
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4.0 out of 5 stars Most fans will only care about winning trophies and will be glad the barren days are behind us, 4 Aug 2014
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A very interesting look at the changes at Manchester City, although David did complain too much about the direction the club has taken. Most fans will only care about winning trophies and will be glad the barren days are behind us
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2.0 out of 5 stars I enjoyed reading this book, 7 Sep 2014
This review is from: Richer Than God: Manchester City, Modern Football and Growing Up (Paperback)
I enjoyed reading this book, it's about an ordinary club with a rich sugar daddy and a set of supporters who sold their soul to get success on the pitch..... that's modern football
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