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127 Reviews
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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The full story
I loved the film so when I saw there was a book as well I was intrigued. This tells the full story of Lionel Logue and his friendship with the Duke of York/King George VI, from the birth to death of both men. There's lots of fascinating historical and personal details and the book complements the film really well. The Lionel Logue who emerges is quite a different...
Published on 18 Jan 2011 by Mickey

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An adequate B.B.C. drama
Issued, no doubt, as an accompanyment to the film "The Kings Speech", this dramatisation is an adequate peice of story telling of the kind the B.B.C. reels out with consumate ease.

If a brief royal dramatisation played out to the normal high B.B.C. standards is your cup of tea, then this short [45 mins] programme will more than effectively fill a void. For...
Published on 19 May 2011 by Paul M


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60 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The full story, 18 Jan 2011
This review is from: The King's Speech (Paperback)
I loved the film so when I saw there was a book as well I was intrigued. This tells the full story of Lionel Logue and his friendship with the Duke of York/King George VI, from the birth to death of both men. There's lots of fascinating historical and personal details and the book complements the film really well. The Lionel Logue who emerges is quite a different character to the one portrayed by Geoffrey Rush, and the book reinforces what a special story this is. If you enjoyed the film I recommend this book.
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118 of 125 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "How one Man Saved the Monarchy"..., 28 Nov 2010
By 
Jill Meyer (United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The King's Speech (Paperback)
In lieu of being able to watch the movie "The King's Speech" because it hasn't been released yet, I ordered the book by the same name, written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark Logue, and his co-author, Peter Conradi. The book is a well-written biography of Australian-born speech therapist Lionel Logue and his work with Britain's Prince Albert when he was Duke of York in the 1920's and continuing on in the 1930's when "Bertie" became King - George VI - in 1936, and then afterward during WW2.

Albert, son of King George V and younger brother of Edward VIII, had developed a stammer during his youth, which made him shy and uncommunicative. As someone who has struggled all my life with a relatively mild stutter, I thought it was good that Mark Logue did not attribute the cause of Bertie's stammer to any one thing. Stuttering is an impediment which seems to arise from both/either physical and psychological reasons and most of the time cannot be properly ascribed to any one thing. In Bertie's case, it was possibly from a difficult youth. He and his siblings were not close to their parents - as was common in those days - and his parents seemed to rather scare him when they were together. A sadistic nanny and the changing of his left-handedness to right may have contributed to his stutter. In any case, he was a man who could not always control his own speech, and he was moving into some situations where he would be called on to speak publicly and to do so often.

After his marriage, Bertie consulted Lionel Logue who had emigrated to England from Australia with his wife and young family and set up a practice in speech therapy in London's Harley Street. After much practice, Bertie was able to give speeches, but he depended on Lionel Logue's continued help as he became king - first in peacetime and then in wartime. The many speeches by radio that George was called on to make in the 25 or so years of his rule were always difficult for him, but Logue's work made them bearable to the king. Logue and George VI became friends - of a sort - because of their work together.

Mark Logue and Peter Conradi were able to look through Lionel Logue's case files and put together a very good record of Logue's work with George VI. Whether Lionel Logue "saved the monarchy" is a bit in doubt, but he did give confidence and success to the George VI when he - and the nation and the Commonwealth - needed it the most.

A note to the authors, Wallis Simpson was from Maryland, not Pennsylvania.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The King's Speech, 19 Feb 2011
By 
This review is from: The King's Speech (Paperback)
Most interesting and very well written.
I enjoyed the book - it gives an insight as to what goes on behind closed doors!
The book was very absorbing and hard to put down once you get past the first chapter.
The dialogue between the two men was fascinating.
The book also brought out the horror which the King had of public speaking, and I'm sure would help anyone who has to speak in public and finds it difficult.

I would also recommend the film to anyone who has enjoyed this book.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well done!, 1 Feb 2011
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I love history so really enjoyed reading this account. It is written by Lionel Logue's grandson, Mark. He has access to hundreds of letters, diary entries, photographs and newspaper clippings which Lionel Logue had collected throughout his career - as well as access to family memories. This makes the book a very accurate and personal account. You will not find out details of how Logue treated the king however, as he never wrote up the case; nor did he set out his methods for curing speech impediments in a formal way or have an apprentice to pass the information on to. I found this information in the introduction which is very interesting and informative, explaining what records the author already had at his disposal, how he found yet more records, but also what is missing. I would also like to praise the formating of the kindle version! It shows how well these books can work on the kindle if the publisher sets it out properly. There are several black and white photos included - which work very well on the kindle, and live links to the references, as well as an index. This is a personal account which tells a lot about the relationship between Logue and his pupil, King George VI.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A different performance that is entertaining and informing, 21 Jun 2011
By 
Mr. Stephen Redman (York England) - See all my reviews
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A single CD lasting only 45 minutes - that being the only serious criticism. For the cost I expected a 60 to 75 minute performance.

That aside the play itself is excellent. Not to be confused with the award winning movie, the material is very different yet on the same theme. As a lover of the movie I jumped at the chance of the play. This is not the movie without pictures - this is taken from a different angle and is different enough to make it unique.

The performance is not ruined by music or too many sound effects. The range of actors includes those representing the princesses Elizabeth and Margaret.

Logue is still a main feature and the insight into some events is very good. I especially liked the idea of the royal family counting 1..2..3 before walking onto the balcony to wave to the crowds.

The quality is as good as any Radio 4 afternoon performance that you would expect but a very topical subject with a refreshing change of perspective from the movie that seems to enhance it rather than compete with it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Radio Fit for a King, 22 Mar 2013
By 
pacem et amorem (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
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Having not had a chance to see the film, I decided that this would be a good way to explore the story of how Lionel Logue helped Prince Albert, Duke of York/King George VI to overcome his crippling speech disfluency. It is an interesting story and this BBC production concentrates on the special relationship that developed between Logue and his patient. I find it fascinating that Logue was able to do for the Duke/King what many others had failed i.e. bring the stammer under control. Knowing people who suffer from speech disfluency, I am aware of how socially crippling it can be and how difficult it can be to manage it.
Makes you wonder what would have happened if these two men had not found one another.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book is always better, 21 Sep 2011
By 
G. J. Weeks (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The King's Speech (Paperback)
I saw the film first and found it uplifting and a worthy Oscar winner but this is the real thrilling story and all the better for its accuracy. The story is spead over the real time scale and the person who introduces the duke to the therapist remains uncertain. Nor do we have the chummy Aussie over familiarity with the use of Christian names. One learns of the depth of this friendship over the years and the deep mutual respect of these men. Unlike today's kiss and tell celebrities, Logue remained quiet about his most famous patient. Two people helped the duke become a respected and loved king. One was his wife, and this is the other.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short but Powerful, 29 July 2011
By 
John Ferngrove (Hants UK) - See all my reviews
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My wife's review:

At the time I ordered this CD I had not seen the film of the same title, so the whole story was new to me. I knew that King George V had a speech impediment and that he was not at all keen on public speaking, but that was all. This CD, which is taken from a radio play, briefly tells the story of the King's speech tuition and the broadcast on National Radio of his speech at the beginning of the Second World War. It portrays the frustration the King went through because he wanted to get it right. I enjoyed it and found it educational as well as entertaining, but one criticism is that it is too short. I think people would feel they had their money's worth more if perhaps it had been included in a series of radio plays, rather than on its own and at a time when the film was being shown at cinemas and people may have expected a more detailed story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Kings Speech, 22 Jun 2011
By 
M.M - See all my reviews
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It may be helpful to have seen the Colin Firth film or to have read the book as this radio play starts right after the coronation of the King George V with not much preamble..

It has 45 minutes to fill the listener in on the background detail and maybe that is why the King has a rather revealing conversation with Lionel Logue as he tells him about his relationship with his father. On the other hand Logue was a close confidante of the King's for over 11 years, seeing him at his most frustrated and embarrassed and coaxing him into doing, quite well on the whole, what was anathema to him, public speaking and broadcasting.

I found it rather touching and thought Alex Jennings was very good as the king and Trevor Littledale gave good support as Logue.

I also found the ending quite sad as they ponder on what the future would be for George's beloved elder daughter who he never wished to see put into the position she would inherit. He just wanted a quiet family life.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A cash-in, but a good one., 19 Jun 2011
By 
A. I. McCulloch "Andrea" (Co Durham) - See all my reviews
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This is a short radio play from 2009, cannily released by the BBC (and re-broadcast back in January) to capitalise on the superb success of The King's Speech.

Alex Jennings isn't Colin Firth (and his language is a lot cleaner than Colin's in the film) but he does put over the same sense of frustration with himself that the King must have felt as he looked at the script of his Coronation speech - "Five hundred and seventy-two words in total and most of them impossible for me to say."

For those who enjoyed the film or did not - or could not - see it, this is a concentrated representation of the story. It deserves to stand on its own.

Bit of trivia that I unearthed - some of you may remember the playwright Mark Burgess as the actor who played Gordon Collins in Brookside. One of his other plays sounds particularly intriguing - 'Einstein in Cromer' - who knew?
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The King's Speech: Based on the Recently Discovered Diaries of Lionel Logue
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