Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's in the detail.
I used to think that a decade was the more appropriate time period for a detailed analysis – particularly when it was the subject matter of a book – but focussing like this does on just 1965 had some surprises in store. I have a great interest in the era as a whole so thought I would check it out. Actually I wanted to know why particularly 1965?
Firstly I...
Published 7 months ago by Kevin Cann

versus
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born
In this book author, Christoper Bray, examines the year 1965 - what he calls a pivotal year, in a pivotal decade. There were some books brought out fifty years after 1963 (the year of the Profumo Affair, Beatlemania and the Great Train Robbery) and a few volumes (mostly in the States) to celebrate fifty years of the British Invasion, but this is the first I have seen...
Published 10 months ago by S Riaz


Most Helpful First | Newest First

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born, 27 April 2014
By 
S Riaz "S Riaz" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In this book author, Christoper Bray, examines the year 1965 - what he calls a pivotal year, in a pivotal decade. There were some books brought out fifty years after 1963 (the year of the Profumo Affair, Beatlemania and the Great Train Robbery) and a few volumes (mostly in the States) to celebrate fifty years of the British Invasion, but this is the first I have seen championing the importance of 1965 and I was interested to read it.

The book begins with the death of Churchill and T.S. Eliot. It was the end of an era, specifically of two, great men, who looked to the past for inspiration. As Bray states, with their death, "right on cue, the future arrived." This book encompasses a lot of different aspects of the year - from feminism, cars, fashion, politics, television, books, music and class mobility. There is no doubt that it was a year which broke down class barriers and created a new aristocracy. With the Beatles, regional accents suddenly appeared - not only on the radio and television, but in vogue. After them, Michael Caine, David Bailey and others helped make other voices, other than the `upper class' tones of BBC English acceptable.

Naturally, music figures largely in this year. It was the year Bob Dylan became electric, the Stones needed some satisfaction and the Beatles released Rubber Soul. There is much about the Beatles - or, rather about John Lennon. For the author makes it plain that he feels Lennon was the main contributor to the Beatles and I have to say right now that if you are a Beatles fan (as I am) then you will probably not like this book. The author trots out various snide and unpleasant remarks about Paul - or `Macca', as he feels free to call him - and George and Ringo might as well have not existed. By the final chapter, even he seems to realise his malicious digs have been one too many and tries to reign himself in, but it is too little and too late.

There is, in fact, rather too much about this book which reveals too many personal biases. It is obviously apparent that the author is a huge fan of Peter Cooke and "Not Only... But Also," is given great coverage (accompanied by Lennon's poetry readings....) but David Frost and "That Was the Week That Was," is dismissed within a couple of lines. As the author has written books on Michael Caine and Sean Connery, he brings his research into the section on the Cold War and his musings on James Bond and Harry Palmer are worth reading.

Elsewhere, there are inaccuracies. When talking about the arrest of The Moors Murderers Brady and Hindley, he exclaims that it was, "Britain's first encounter with serial killers." Well, Jack the Ripper springs to mind - and how about John Christie? In fact, the first known serial killer in Britain was Mary Ann Cotton, executed in 1873. The Moors Murderers were a shock to the nation, but perhaps, sadly, not as shocking as they could have been - even female serial killers had been encountered.

Still, there is a lot of interest here. From the disastrous experiment in comprehensive education, which has left us with yet another government who hail mostly from the public schools of the privileged, to R.D. Laing and his contribution to rock culture with, "the liberating qualities of LSD," to the chill of the Cold War, the novels of Le Carre and The Krays, it was a monumental year of great change and the influence of much that happened is still being felt today. However, although there is much of interest, the book lacks warmth, humour and was, in places, rather mean spirited.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's in the detail., 10 July 2014
This review is from: 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born (Hardcover)
I used to think that a decade was the more appropriate time period for a detailed analysis – particularly when it was the subject matter of a book – but focussing like this does on just 1965 had some surprises in store. I have a great interest in the era as a whole so thought I would check it out. Actually I wanted to know why particularly 1965?
Firstly I wondered if just one year could feature so large that it could take the analysis of a book – and still remain a worthwhile read. Mind you, as the author has cleverly identified, 1965 really wasn’t like any other in the decade. Churchill’s death was of course pivotal – a massive moment in our cultural history (I remember it clearly and I was only 6), but this year was also monumental for music and the Arts, and many other important areas of social progress and change. It was only as the pages went by that these facts became clear.
Bray couldn’t have packed any more detail into this book. For that reason it’s really not a book I felt I could read at speed, particularly as I wanted to retain much from it. The insights into R.D. Laing were particularly interesting, as were the larger references to cultural giants of the day Bob Dylan, Lennon & McCartney, T.S. Eliot (who died a few streets from Churchill in the same month I discovered), and even Mary Whitehouse. Censorship issues are covered in much detail here.
It’s clear that a lot of time and thought has been put into this book. This is why it is a definite 5 star. It’s the detail that particularly makes this book for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 23 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born (Hardcover)
Excellent book bought as a birthday present for our daughter who was born in 1965
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Like most young people of the time it all went ..., 9 July 2014
By 
Mr. John F. Marcham (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born (Hardcover)
In 1965 I finished being a student and got my first teaching job but the year did not seem to be so monumental as Christopher Bray makes out. Like most young people of the time it all went over my head. I did not find the book an "easy read" but it was good to reflect on that year and realise the subtle nuances of the year.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Jan. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
An informative book and good value. Fast delivery.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I was disappointed. Analysis is lightweight and trivial, 29 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born (Hardcover)
I was disappointed . Analysis is lightweight and trivial.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I did not enjoy this book i thought it would be more about ..., 23 Oct. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: 1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born (Hardcover)
I did not enjoy this book i thought it would be more about the social history of Britain and for me there wasn't enough emphasis on that. I haven't read it all because I found it boring sorry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born
1965: The Year Modern Britain Was Born by Christopher Bray (Hardcover - 24 April 2014)
£16.59
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews