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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful resource for your daily walk with God, 23 Aug. 1998
By A Customer
I bought this bible as I was looking for a resource to bring me closer to God. For me it is simpler to read and understand. I am just beginning my walk with God and His word is so very important. The living translation is fantastic. I would recommend it those who are seeking the word of God. I value mine greatly!!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Isaiah was never so clear!, 10 April 1998
By A Customer
This translation helped renew the heart of a seminarian who had studied to much for her own good. When I approached this translation with a heart that was growing cold, its accuracy, poetry, and readability were just what the doctor ordered. This translation is meant to be read out loud...works wonderfully for public scripture reading and is excellent for private study. Best Bible for youth out there, hands down.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read, improved version of The Livng Bible, 6 Sept. 2003
The first Bible I read was the King James. In 1965 my mother gave me a copy of Living Letters [the first instalment of The Living Bible]. It opened up the Letters of Paul to me. Despite its Arminian bias, I was confronted with God's sovereignty when I got to Romans 9.
At the same time I read Norman Vincent Peale's The Power of Positive Thinking. I found Paul appealing, and Peale appalling!
The New Living Translation is a huge improvement of Ken Taylor's original, because it has been revised by bona fide Bible scholars,such as Don Carson, Craig Blomberg and Willem vanGemeren, some of whom also worked on versions such as the NIV, ESV, etc.
The NLT is reliable and very readable. If you are serious about bible study you will also use versions such as the NIV and NRSV and ESV, because it is beneficial to use a variety of bible versions.
If you are able, studying Greek, Hebrew and Aramiac is the best way to get close to the original bible.
I recommend the NLT as a great place to start your reading of the bible, and a terrific version to use to read large chunks quickly.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The NLT is a very easy to read Bible version., 30 Dec. 1996
By A Customer
The much anticipated revision of the Living Bible (LB) was just
recently released. The new revised Bible is being called the New
Living Translation (NLT), advertised as the "publishing event of the
decade." Many who have read and used the LB for personal Bible
study loved its simple and easy-to-read language. However, the LB,
while praised by many, both scholar and laymen alike, for its easy-to-
understand prose, had to be checked against and compared with other
more stricter or literal versions. The LB was noted for containing
errros in certain texts. Kenneth Taylor had used the ASV to produce
the highly readable LB. It is not a literal translation, based on the
original Hebrew and Greek Scriptures, but a paraphrase of the
Scriptures and it tended to reflect some of the views of the
paraphraser and not necessarily what the original writings said.

The LB has become a successful and popular Bible version, with
some 40 million copies printed by 1996. In order to produce a more
accurate translation, based on the original Hebrew and Greek
Scriptures, a group of some 90 Bible scholars got together in 1989
to work on a revision of the LB. Their goal was to create a Bible
translation that is accurate and yet reads like the LB, a paraphrase
of the Bible. Did they achieve their goals? A comparison of the LB
and the NLT will answer that question.

The Tetragrammaton :

One major difference between the LB and the NLT is the complete
removal of the divine name from the NLT. The NLT says in its
Introduction that it was decided to render the Tetragrammaton as "the
LORD", following a custom that is practiced by most modern English
versions of the Bible. The LB, in contrast, used the divine name,
rendered as Jehovah, many times throughout the OT. The NLT, only
contains the name in two footnotes in Exodus 3:16 and Exodus 6:3.
The footnote reads "Hebrew Yahweh; traditionally rendered Jehovah."
The name YHWH, translated in English as Yahweh or Jehovah, appears
over 6,000 times in the original Hebrew Bible. However, the
translators of the NLT decided to follow the custom of completely
removing the Name from the Bible substituting it with the title
"LORD", and confining the Name, which appeared over 6,000 times in
the Hebrew text, to mere footnotes in Exodus 3:15 and Exodus 6:3.
When it comes to the test of accuracy, this translation has failed by
replacing YHWH (JHVH in latinized form) with a title instead of the
name Yahweh or Jehovah. In that regards, the LB is more accurate
than the NLT.

Interpretative Verses and Footnotes Removed:
The LB has been criticized for containing interpretative verses and
footnotes for selected Bible texts. For instance, the LB paraphrases
Psalms 115:17 as follows: "The dead cannot sing praises to Jehovah
here on earth." A footnote to the text mentions that "here on earth"
is implied. However a check with more literal translations gives a
different view.

The NLT gives a more accurate rendering. There it reads "The dead
cannot sing praises to the LORD, for they have gone into the silence
of the grave." Regarding Ecclesiastes 9:5 which reads according to
the LB "For the living at least know that they will die! But the dead
know nothing; they don't even have their memories." A footnote
regarding that verse and verse 10 says: "These statements are
Solomon's discouraged opinion, and do not reflect a knowledge of
God's truth on these points!" The NLT translates Eccleciastes 9:5
as follows: "The living at least know they will die, but the dead
know nothing. They have no further reward, nor are they remembered."
(NLT). The revised version does not contain any footnote on that
text. In Matthew 22:32, the LB reads "I am the God of Abraham, Isaac,
and Jacob. So God is not the God of the dead but of the living."
In a foonote Kenneth Taylor interprets that verse as if Abraham,
Isaac and Moses were now alive in the presence of God. However, many
hold a diffrent interpretation. Since the context is dealing with
the issue of the resurrection, some hold that Jesus is emphasizing
that they will certainly become alive again in the new age (compare
parallel account in Luke 20:27-38 with a strict version ). The
assurance that they will be alive again, explains why Jesus speaks of
it as an actual event. (compare Romans 4:17). The NLT does not
contain an interpretative footnote on Matthew 22:32, allowing the
readers to interpret the Scriptures for themselves, and coming to a
conclusion that is in harmony with the rest of the Scriptures.

Some other interpretative verses of the LB include texts such as
Psalms 9:17 - "The wicked shall be sent away to hell." There the NLT
reads "The wicked will go down to the grave," with a footnote
stating that the Hebrew word translated grave is Sheol. The LB says
in Proverbs 9:18 "But they don't realize that her former guests are
now citizens of hell."; there the NLT says "But the men don't realize
that heer former guests are now in the grave." The LB paraphrases
the last part of 1 Peter 3:18 regarding Jesus as "though his body
died, his spirit lived on." The NLT paraphrases "more literally" as:
"He suffered physical death, but he was raised to life in the Spirit,
" with a footnote indicating that "Spirit" can be rendered with a
lower case as "spirit."

Its Language - Definately LB-Like
As can be seen from the few samples just cited, the NLT has
corrected some of the inaccuracies of the LB. It has also removed
most, if not all, of the interpretative footnotes. However, it has
retained the much loved easy-to-understand language of the LB.
Let's read just one sample of this fast-paced, easy-to-understand
version:

Isaiah 65:17-25 "Look! I am creating new heavens, and a new earth-so
wonderful that no will even think about the old ones anymore. Be
glad; rejoice forever in my creation! And look! I will create
Jerusalem as a place of happiness. Her people will be a source of
joy. I will rejoice in Jerusalem and delight in my people. And the
sound of weeping and cyring will be heard no more. No longer will
babies die when only a few days old. No longer will adult die before
they have lived a full life. No longer will people be considered old
at one hundred! Only sinners will die that young! In those days
people will build houses and eat of the fruit of their own vineyards..
...." Actually, one can just open the NLT in any page and find the
Word of God beautifully expressed.

Conclusion: Its Improved in Some Respects
The NLT is more reliable than the LB; it contains no
interpretative footnotes like the LB; however, since NLT is still a
paraphrase, some verses seem to reflect the translator(s) viewpoint
(See for example Matthew 7:12 in both the LB and the NLT: both speak
of the way to "hell", but in the original Greek, as noted in their
footnotes, the word should read "destruction". Also, in the NLT,
Romans 8:18-25, in particular verse 23, is apparently interpretative.
) The NLT, nevertheless, has fewer interpretative verses; and the
translators to some extent have achieved their goal-maintaining the
prose as simple as the LB and remaining as faithful as possible to
the original Word of God. The major flaw, I believe, was the removal
of a rendering of the Tetragrammaton as either Yahweh or Jehovah.
If the name was retained it could have been a version with a very
high standard of accuracy and faithfullness to the original text.
Since there is no such thing as a perfect Bible version, the NLT can
still be compare with other versions, especially the literal ones like the ASV or
Darby's version.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Bible Translation available!, 13 Sept. 1997
By A Customer
I have numerous translations of the Bible, but the New Living Translation is unsurpassed for ease of reading, accuracy and beauty of language. The best choice, both for new believers and those who have read "The Book of Books" for many years. You'll love it! Even difficult passages become clear and easy to understand.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, 14 Jun. 1999
By A Customer
This is the first bible that I have found that I am able to apply to everday life. The index allows a quick reference for verses which offer guidance for life's situations.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easy-to-read translation., 17 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Giant Print Bible-Nlt (Paperback)
The New Living Translation is a very simplified, easy to read, modern translation that makes bible reading and studying interesting and useful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 10 July 2014
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A very nice bible for the price and the translation is very readable.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's the Bible...what can I say?, 2 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
Hey people, this is the living word of God...anything less than five stars would be a sacrilege. I'd definitely recommend it to anyone, young or old.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just what I expected and a good price too, 4 Nov. 2014
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Thanks very much. Just what I expected and a good price too, David.
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Botts' Illustrated Bible-Nlt
Botts' Illustrated Bible-Nlt by Tim Botts (Hardcover - Oct. 2000)
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