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on 8 December 2013
My full review found here: [...]

Reeves's basis is: What is the point of the Trinity? Why does it matter if we have one or not? How does what I know about the Trinity affect my daily living?

When we look at Michelangelo's painting "The Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel, we see Adam limply holding his hand out, being supported by his knee. But to whom? As we continue to scan the painting, we see that he is barely holding his hand out to God who is reaching out, almost straining, to make contact with Adam.

All of humankind has this kind of meager attitude (less actually) toward God. But the Father, overflowing in love, created us and sent His Son to die and share in what He has so that we could be co-inheritors with Christ and be reunited with God who then gives us even more: His Spirit, who "not only enables us to know and love Christ; he also gives us the mind of Christ, making us like him" (pg. 95). And the best we can do is lift up a finger, as if even pointing to God is going too far.

This book is about the love of the Trinity for mankind and how it is so unexpected, undeserved, unmerited, and how God continues to show His mercy on us even still.

-------
This book is 130 pages, but really it's only 121. It's such a short read!

Reeves says that the Trinity isn't an oddity (for it is who God is, and God isn't odd), but many of the images people use to describe God (eggs, water, a shamrock, even bacon) make the Trinity seem anything but `normal.'

It's a simple read: I read this book before I arrived in York for my last Bible College semester Spring '13. I read the first 2 chapters at home, and then the other 5 on the plane ride over to the UK. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down, but it was so simple I didn't want to put it down!

It's a deep read: But simple doesn't equal childish. This book can be understood by high schoolers to scholars to pastors to teachers to moms and dads. It's not a book on being able to spit out facts on the omniscience of the Holy Spirit and how the hypostatic union of Christ works. It's not about brainy knowledge. It's about a true relationship, and the more we see how much God loves us (though we'll never scratch the surface), the more we want to be enveloped in that love and spend time with Him and live in a way that pleases Him.

This does not replace the Bible (of course), but it is a helpful and practical supplement.
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on 8 December 2013
My full review found here: [...]

Reeves's basis is: What is the point of the Trinity? Why does it matter if we have one or not? How does what I know about the Trinity affect my daily living?

When we look at Michelangelo's painting "The Creation of Adam" in the Sistine Chapel, we see Adam limply holding his hand out, being supported by his knee. But to whom? As we continue to scan the painting, we see that he is barely holding his hand out to God who is reaching out, almost straining, to make contact with Adam.

All of humankind has this kind of meager attitude (less actually) toward God. But the Father, overflowing in love, created us and sent His Son to die and share in what He has so that we could be co-inheritors with Christ and be reunited with God who then gives us even more: His Spirit, who "not only enables us to know and love Christ; he also gives us the mind of Christ, making us like him" (pg. 95). And the best we can do is lift up a finger, as if even pointing to God is going too far.

This book is about the love of the Trinity for mankind and how it is so unexpected, undeserved, unmerited, and how God continues to show His mercy on us even still.

-------
This book is 130 pages, but really it's only 121. It's such a short read!

Reeves says that the Trinity isn't an oddity (for it is who God is, and God isn't odd), but many of the images people use to describe God (eggs, water, a shamrock, even bacon) make the Trinity seem anything but `normal.'

It's a simple read: I read this book before I arrived in York for my last Bible College semester Spring '13. I read the first 2 chapters at home, and then the other 5 on the plane ride over to the UK. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down, but it was so simple I didn't want to put it down!

It's a deep read: But simple doesn't equal childish. This book can be understood by high schoolers to scholars to pastors to teachers to moms and dads. It's not a book on being able to spit out facts on the omniscience of the Holy Spirit and how the hypostatic union of Christ works. It's not about brainy knowledge. It's about a true relationship, and the more we see how much God loves us (though we'll never scratch the surface), the more we want to be enveloped in that love and spend time with Him and live in a way that pleases Him.

This does not replace the Bible (of course), but it is a helpful and practical supplement.
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on 2 March 2015
What a delightful book. You can truly delight in our God who is indeed three in one. Thank you Mike Reeves and I thank God for you. This book has drawn me closer to the Lord more than ever before. Highly recommend it to Christians and non Christians. The Former will draw closer to the Saviour and the latter will come to know the true God and will give his or her life to God.
A small message for Mike Reeves
Philippians 1: 3
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on 21 May 2013
The Psalm writer grasps after a way of picturing the might and majesty of God saying, "Better is one day in your courts than a thousand elsewhere; I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God than dwell in the tents of the wicked." - God is so great and perfect that the Psalmist can't imagine anywhere better than in His presence, even if it means being the receptionist!

Sadly, Christians have often emphasised God's size and power that they start believing that He is an unknowable mystery.

Delighting in the Trinity shows that this is simply not the case; I may not be able to know everything about God, but I can know something about Him. The truths I learn won't be complete, but they'll still be true.

The beauty of this book is that it doesn't try to "explain God" as much as it invites us to see how a God who is Father, Son and Spirit can be known, worshipped and loved. Far from treating God like an unknowable mystery, this book takes ideas that have often seemed like dry classroom ideas to be analysed, and reveals them to be sticks of dynamite that warm our hearts and give us every reason to love God. Rather than being an academic textbook, Reeves is constantly helping us to see how our understanding of God changes our minds, hearts and lives. This book really is about "Delighting" in a doctrine that is often treated as dull and difficult - and it really will help you to delight more in the God of the Bible.

While the whole book was packed with highlights, Chapter 5 was my favourite entitled, "Who among the gods is like, O Lord?" In it, Reeves shows how seeing God as a Fountain of overflowing love impacts the way we understand God's holiness, wrath and glory. Instead of seeing those things as unfortunate side-effects of God's character, Reeves shows why these things are actually good news because he is a God who is Three in One. Really, that's what the whole book is about; seeing God as good, beautiful and desirable above everything else we can imagine.

Whether the doctrine of Trinity scares you or bores you, "Delighting in the Trinity" is a wonderful invitation to step past these barriers to fall more in love with the God who overflows with love.

I can't recommend it highly enough.
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on 26 June 2016
An excellent introduction to the Christian faith, sweeping asides many heresies and false beliefs and giving a positive answer to many questions that arise.
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on 15 April 2015
great read
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on 4 April 2013
I was rather disappointed by this book and even found it a little silly in places. I read it twice and gave it time to sink in but was left with more questions than it answered. I found statements such as: "What was God doing before creation - eternally loving His Son through the Spirit" to be incredibly presumptious! Though this is OBVIOUSLY true, nobody actually knows what ELSE God may have been doing before He began to create! To suppose such a thing is limited and humanistic at best; hardly very original and not at all profound. I prefer my beliefs to be backed up by Scripture and didn't find much evidence of that in this book. What i did find was a whole lot of suppositions and various philosopher's OPINIONS down through the ages.

Some time after i found another book, with the exact same title but written by Tim Chester, which was much more informative, insightful and full of proofs from the Bible. It was obvious that here was a book that had been thoroughly researched. It too was easy reading and not weighed down with theology but at the same time managed to treat the reader with a little more intelligence and it certainly held it's own as a thesis on the Reality of the Trinity. I found this other book to be more beautiful because it's Truths and insights were captured from Scripture and included the evolution of the Trinitarian belief down through the Ages of Church History. This made for much more convincing reading and even, dare i say it, moments of REAL delight.

It leads me to be rather suspicious about who had the idea for such a book in the first place? Michael Reeves or Tim Chester..? It's not the first time theologians have been in competition with each other and pinched one another's ideas. What's even worse is one will take another's thesis and then go and weave their own spin throughout it all, in an attempt to try and convince the world they've been original. But Tim Chester's book has that 'ring of authenticity' all the way through, which knocks this book off the shelf, in my opinion.
This is my last review on the subject and i'm sticking to it!
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