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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good solid teaching on the work of the Holy Spirit.
A very good and simple to read book, in which John Stott sets out some clear guidelines for understanding the work of the Holy Spirit. By examination of key events in the Book of Acts, Stott is able to clear up some misunderstandings that people have concerning the idea of the Baptism of the Spirit (e.g. is it something that happens in the life of a christian, as a...
Published on 30 Sep 2006 by Mr. Andrew Young

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2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars light reading, lacking in evidence
Although this work attempts to tackle the very central issue of baptism in the Holy Spirit, it does so poorly. Its only real strength is in rhetoric, in which Stott is a master, but it demonstrates a very blinkered view, a failure to engage with significant arguments, a failure to reflect critically on his own logic & conclusions and a condescending attitude to the...
Published on 12 Jan 2010 by J W Barrie


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good solid teaching on the work of the Holy Spirit., 30 Sep 2006
This review is from: Baptism and Fullness (Paperback)
A very good and simple to read book, in which John Stott sets out some clear guidelines for understanding the work of the Holy Spirit. By examination of key events in the Book of Acts, Stott is able to clear up some misunderstandings that people have concerning the idea of the Baptism of the Spirit (e.g. is it something that happens in the life of a christian, as a secondary experience to conversion). The events looked at include, Pentecost, the disciples encounter with the Samaritains and Paul's meeting with the Ephesian disciples. Stott then gives another chapter where he expounds 1 Corinthians 12:13, showing what is really meant by the term. Stott then goes on to show the difference between being 'baptised' andbeing 'filled' with the Spirit. He then finishes with teaching on the fruit of the Spirit, and deals with the issue of spiritual gift for today. A very important book for christians to read today. It should provoke much thought on the subject, and ought to clarify many important issues. Strongly recommended.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Think you need to be baptized in the Spirit?, 31 May 2005
This review is from: Baptism and Fullness (Paperback)
Confused about what it really means to have a God centred life filled with the Holy Spirit? Is it really about losing control, being slain in the spirit and speaking in tounges? Do we need another Pentecost? Should this filling with the Holy Spirit be a one off event? What are the true marks of a mature Christian?
Well John Stott gives an excellent explanation from the Bible about what it really means to be filled with the Spirit. His clear & simple presentation is short yet thorough, and he also exposes some of the myths and misconceptions that surround our churches today.
Approximately 100 pages you could read this book in a few hours, yet I would argue this is essential reading for anyone who is wrestling with these issues. Every church leader should read it!
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2 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars light reading, lacking in evidence, 12 Jan 2010
This review is from: Baptism and Fullness: The Work of the Holy Spirit Today (IVP Classics) (Paperback)
Although this work attempts to tackle the very central issue of baptism in the Holy Spirit, it does so poorly. Its only real strength is in rhetoric, in which Stott is a master, but it demonstrates a very blinkered view, a failure to engage with significant arguments, a failure to reflect critically on his own logic & conclusions and a condescending attitude to the reader. What it does is to reassure the anxious Christian that there is no need for them to seek any more of the Spirit of God, and those who are thus reassured are at once made spiritually poor and given the illusion that they are rich. "Blessed are the poor in Spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" is not intended to make us content in our spiritual poverty: quite the contrary.

Stott is unfortunately, though a great defender of the central thrust of the Gospel, one of those modern-day teachers who makes the Church within his sphere of influence like that of Laodicea - though he has undoubtedly written some great works, he has failed to hear what the Spirit is saying to the churches today, trading rather on the strength of his reputation.

While there is a little more intellectual honesty in Stott's examination of Acts & the doctrinal conclusions that might be drawn from it than that of the traditional Pentecostal churches, this honesty is not completely watertight and betrays his own prejudice in places.

Please do not be held back by the "fullness" described by Stott in this work. Although what he describes are wonderful things, do not let those things conceal from sight the remainder of what God has for you. While Stott has a lot of wisdom on many subjects, this, unfortunately, is one area in which he misses the mark by a long shot. I recommend that you don't bother reading it.
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