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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just one crisis after another!
This us such a helpful guide to the Eucharist, written with great humour and sensitive insight. I have read the present Pope's "Introduction to Christianity", which follows the creed in its careful explanation, and Timothy Radcliffe is as careful and thorough but with just that bit of British humour to keep one reading - and chuckling - beyond the end of the chapter. Most...
Published on 13 Mar. 2009 by D. White

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19 of 47 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Radcliffe: Why go to Church?
Radcliffe was the former Master of the Dominican Order and although a Roman Catholic was invited by Dr Williams to write this year's Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent book choice. Despite this recommendation the work unfortunately has evidence of having been produced in haste, since there are quite a few typos and errors. The worse being the confusion over the date of the...
Published on 31 Mar. 2009 by John Edwards


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37 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just one crisis after another!, 13 Mar. 2009
By 
D. White - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
This us such a helpful guide to the Eucharist, written with great humour and sensitive insight. I have read the present Pope's "Introduction to Christianity", which follows the creed in its careful explanation, and Timothy Radcliffe is as careful and thorough but with just that bit of British humour to keep one reading - and chuckling - beyond the end of the chapter. Most Lent books take all of Lent to read, but this one is going down at a rate of knots! There is also a great bibliography, and I have ordered books he mentions, feeling that anything he uses to make a point must be worth my reading, too.
My title comes from a comment he makes about salvation history, how we grow through the crises of our lives, and which he shows are parallel in many ways with the life of Christ shown in the Eucharist. Those who have never suffered a crisis of any kind need not read this book. Everyone else should!
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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best lent books, 26 Feb. 2009
By 
Chris (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
I have read other Lent books, and whilst this does not specifically deal with the last days of Jesus (although the Eucharist draws upon it) it certainly takes you deeper in, and is one of the best I have read. I would especially recommend this book to any who have asked the title's question and concluded it is not for them.

There is plenty of illustration, and even if 'spiritual' reading if not something you've engaged in before, this would be a good place to start.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Challenged to face up to God and to the world, 9 Mar. 2009
By 
Ryan Green (Cookham, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
What an inspired and challenging Lent book this is. Timothy Radcliffe takes us on from his previous book 'What is the Point of being a Christian' into a breathtaking analysis of what it means to 'be Church' and to live liturgically. But this is no mere text-book, this is the challenge of Christian discipleship itself. On every page Radcliffe uses compelling examples from literature, contemporary culture, and the tradition of the Church itself to bring to life 'the drama of the Eucharist'. Radcliffe presents to us a liturgy that is not alien and inert, dull and remote, but one that gives meaning to human life itself; the key to understanding what real love is and what it means to create an authentic community of love. Here the drama of the Eucharist becomes the drama of living. Highly recommended.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Appeal of Church, 26 Mar. 2009
By 
Cdr M. G. Hawke (Oban, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
An excellent treatise on the subject based on the three acts within the Roman Catholic Eucharist and, at the same time, fully applicable to other Christian denominations. It is writen clearly, with humour and undeniable logic supported by numerous quotations and references. It is a compelling and challenging read and one I have thoroughly enjoyed.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Not Give This A Go?, 30 Mar. 2009
By 
A. P. Nixon (Northumberland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
This book has prompted thoughtful challenging meditation. It is an un clichéd accessible work, peppered with insight and humour and written by a spiritual master. It compels us to become engaged in the drama of the Eucharist. A jewel of a book for Catholics and Christians from other traditions whish to develop their understanding of the centrality of the Mass. The bibliography is also extremely useful. Thank you Fr Radcliffe your enthusiasm and learning is infectious.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Readable, informative and offering fresh insights, 16 April 2009
By 
N. Adolphus (Shepperton, Middlesex, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
This is an excellent book. Radcliffe explores the Eucharist as a drama in three acts, with chapters reflecting the scenes in the 'play'. The themes of the acts are faith, hope and love. Timothy Radcliffe is the sort of writer that makes complex ideas accessible. For a churchgoer, he opens new windows through which to view the familiar. He illustrates the points he makes by quoting from a wide range of sources, from popular culture as well as theological. Radcliffe describes this book as a companion to his award winning, 'What is the Point of Being a Christian', I will definitely order a copy!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Rowan Williams' Lent book, relating the different movements in the Eucharist to our formation as people in community. About Jes, 2 May 2013
By 
Mr. D. P. Jay (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
Rowan Williams' Lent book(but far superior to the usual run of the mill Lent books), relating the different movements in the Eucharist to our formation as people in community. Each chapter deals with one of the movements of the mass - gathering, scriptures, creed etc.

On scripture, the author quotes: "The beauty and power of the Bible is precisely that it is not clear, simple, and unambiguous. Its language is suggestive, allusive, puzzling -- resembling a conversation with someone who is always leading one to a disclosure that promises to make sense of everything." In Sacred Space: House of God, gate of heaven ed. Philip and John North (Continuum)

About Jesus's question to peter as to whether he loves me, he writes: "In this conversation, two different words are used for love, flea and agapao. Some scholars claim that the difference is not significant, but given John's delight in subtle nuances, this seems implausible. I accept Samuel Wells' translation, which is very similar to that of Pope Benedict, understanding fileo to be the love of friendship and agapao to mean a more radical and unconditional love. This is how Wells translates the exchange:

Jesus: Do you love me wholeheartedly and with no thought for yourself,
differently from the way you love others?
Peter: You know that I love you as a friend.
Jesus: Do you love me wholeheartedly and with no thought for yourself?
Peter: You know that I love you as a friend.
Jesus: Do you love me as a friend?
Peter (hurt): You know everything: you know that I love you as a friend.

Wells and the Pope may agree, more or less, on the translation, but they disagree on its significance. Wells thinks that Peter simply has not yet got it. He assumes that the love of a friend is enough, as if he has learned nothing from his denial of Christ. It was just a failure, and now they can carry on as before. `The poignant irony is that Peter doesn't realise what Jesus is asking and thinks he is giving the answer Jesus wants to hear. He even thinks that Jesus is being unreasonable in asking the question a third time.

I find Pope Benedict's interpretation more convincing. He attributes more intelligence to Peter.

Contrast this negativity with the humility of John the Baptist's use of the same words at the beginning of the Gospel: `Are you Elijah?' `I am not' (1.21).
Perhaps not surprisingly as his successor! Peter is painfully aware of the inadequacy of his love for Jesus, but it is all that he has. The third time that Jesus asks Peter whether he loves him, Jesus just uses the word for friendship. Jesus and Peter know and accept, with pain, that he is capable of no more at this moment.

The third time Jesus only says to Simon: `Fileis-me?', `Do you love me?' Simon understands that his poor love is enough for Jesus, it is the only one of which he is capable, nonetheless he is grieved that the Lord spoke to him in this way. He thus replies: `Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you (jdo-se)'. This is to say that Jesus has put himself on the level of Peter, rather than Peter on Jesus' level! It is exactly this divine conformity that gives hope to the disciple, who experienced the pain of infidelity.'
As C. S. Lewis said, `It is a divine privilege always to be less the beloved than the lover." Four Loves p. 184

Peter comes home to Jesus. Jesus had promised that his Father and he would make their home with the apostles, and this is now achieved. The Eucharist is our home, whatever we have done and been. So many people feel excluded because of their personal circumstances, surprisingly often to do with sex! People are divorced and remarried, live with partners, are gay or whatever and feel unwelcome, or second-class Christians. But these are the situations in which ordinary people find themselves in our society, and these are the people whom Jesus surely invites to come and sit and eat with him on the beach. God accepts our limited, fragile forgetful loves if that is all that we have to offer him now. If there is a place for Peter, who denied Jesus, then there are places for us all. Maybe, like Peter in his conversation with Jesus, some process of healing is needed, courageously facing what we have done and asking for forgiveness, but surely there can be no permanent exclusion.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A superb meditation on the meaning of communion- great Lent book, 12 July 2009
By 
Dr. Peter Davies (Halifax, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
I read this book with great interest. It is a super book that brings out clearly the meaning of the parts of the communion service. It is a perfect study book for Lent- you will understand Easter far more deeply after reading it.

I did not find it easy reading, but that may mean I was assimilating new material as I was reading. It is an easy paced book, and is well suited to being read in small portions over...well 40 days would be about right. I ended up with an impression that the author would be very likeable, and that I would enjoy hearing him preach. I learned a lot from reading him.

I can recommend this book to Christians who want to deepen their understanding of the communion service, and our community.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of his best, 2 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
In in these uncertain times, Timothy Radcliffe never fails to bring reassurance, renewed confidence in and understanding of matters of faith.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought., 15 Mar. 2013
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This review is from: Why Go to Church?: The Drama of the Eucharist: The Archbishop of Canterbury's Lent Book (Paperback)
This book was selected for a Book Review at our local church. Our members enjoyed the discussions which the book created.
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