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97 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone who pays the TV licence fee
Bearing in mind the sheer size and influence of the BBC, and the manner in which it is funded, this book is very important. It is thoroughly researched, well-referenced yet easy to read. Many sections of my well-thumbed copy are now heavily underlined. Excellent.

Chapter headings are:

1. The best broadcaster in the world?

The beginnings...
Published on 1 May 2007 by Mark Stockwells

versus
2 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Trying to convince us that the BBC should be a clone of the Daily Mail
Aitken is unashamedly a Conservative and his axe to grind is that the BBC does not represent his Daily Mail style views. Well I can say the majority of the British population also does not follow his Daily Mail views. He is part of the sad fading minority that is still living under Thatcher, want to vote for UKIP and thinks that Rod Liddle is left wing! He bemoans that...
Published 24 months ago by Andrew Dalby


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97 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for anyone who pays the TV licence fee, 1 May 2007
This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
Bearing in mind the sheer size and influence of the BBC, and the manner in which it is funded, this book is very important. It is thoroughly researched, well-referenced yet easy to read. Many sections of my well-thumbed copy are now heavily underlined. Excellent.

Chapter headings are:

1. The best broadcaster in the world?

The beginnings of the Beeb. Its transition from upholder of the establishment, to the post-1960s era when "the BBC joined in the new mood until it became a battering-ram in the hands of those who wanted to see the old order crumble"

2. A reporter's progress

The author's career in the BBC, starting in the 1980s, when there was still some objectivity in news bulletins. How this changed under "Birtism" from 1987 onwards, when "the task was to make sure reality conformed to our preconceptions."

3. Blowing the whistle

Mr Aitken raised his concerns about institutional left-wing bias at the BBC with his bosses and was told that, as he was so "disaffected" he should consider leaving the BBC.

4. Who are these people?

Profiles of many of the big bugs and head honchos of the Beeb. Most of whom have links with the Labour party, or have worked for The Guardian, etc - all facts are backed up with full references so you can research more if you wish

5. The best European

The obsessive pro-EU bias of the BBC, in stark contrast with the majority view of the UK. The 1970s "mini-purge of editorial staff who were 'ideologically unsound' on Europe". Pretending that Labour Eurosceptics don't exist so that the BBC could present Labour as united on Europe. An overall airtime bias towards Europhile speakers of 2:1.

6. The despised tribes

A difficult topic, this, but Mr Aitken shows the BBC's total disregard for objectivity in this area as well. They demonise certain groups of whom they disapprove: Northern Irish Unionists, Christian fundamentalists, conservative Roman Catholics, UKIP, most Americans - a wide-ranging list "usually categorized, in the sloppy shorthand of progressivism, as 'right-wing'". The pro-IRA stance of the BBC is examined.

7. "Today" at war

The suicide of Dr David Kelly and how this tragic event provided "incontrovertible proof that the BBC takes a definite editorial line on major stories."

8. The moral maze - the moral "values" of the Beeb. The difficulty the BBC has with hearing, let alone facing, any criticism, owing to it's intrinsic sense of moral superiority.

9. Testimonies: "A foghorn bellowing at the nation" - evidence from previous and current employees of the BBC, given entirely in their own words. Some of the interviews from these witnesses pepper the rest of the chapters as well. The fact that these people are too afraid to be named speaks volumes - they are not saying anything illegal or libellous - the Stalinism of the BBC is very evident here.

10. Conclusion - for your own reading pleasure!
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting and Important., 23 July 2008
By 
Stephen "1982" (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Paperback)
As an Ulster Protestant I can say that the BBC is clearly biased against the Unionist community in Northern Ireland. Thus Robin Aitken's chapter "The Despised Tribes" struck a deep chord.

I can give a brief recent example: this years Orange Twelfth of July parades were the most peaceful, family friendly and cross-community in years. However on the 11th night small groups of Roman Catholic rioters were involved in minor scuffles with the police. The national BBC coverage reported this as trouble at the Protestant Orange parades and showed footage of vicious rioting from three years ago!

The chapter on Europe is also damning in the blatant favour shown by the BBC to both the Labour party and the "Europhiles".

An important book about a revered British institution that needs to sort it's act out.
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102 of 118 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The real truth about the BBC - for the first time, 21 Feb. 2007
By 
Foxgoose (Somerset, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
Robin Aitken was a senior journalist at the BBC who realised that the corporation expects all its staff to sing from the same left of centre, pro EU and anti USA hymnsheet.

Whe he complained he was variously ignored, fobbed off, sidelined and even threatened by superiors right up to board level.

I think this is the first time any BBC insider has broken ranks and revealed the bias, distortion and selective reporting that goes into BBC

current affairs broadcasting.

Definitely a "must read" for anybody who wonders why they have to pay a compulsory licence fee for one sided news coverage.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Institutional BBC Bias, 22 Aug. 2007
By 
Barrymx5 (Somerset, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
A brilliant read which gives chapter and verse (and more) to what many licence payers feared. Proof that the BBC has been undermined from within and should have been privatised with the other nationalised industries - and still should be. Pro EU, anti British attitudes are illustrated time and time again. I agree with the reviewer who thinks a copy should be given with every licence which supports the 30,000 people employed by this frightening propaganda machine.
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63 of 74 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Mankind cannot bear too much reality.', 8 May 2007
By 
Guy reid-brown "GRB" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
The answer is `No' by the way.

But you knew that already, didn't you?

The great con of the BBC, as expressed in this book, is that, bar pensioners, every British household that contains a TV has to pay a flat tax for the privilege. This is then used to subsidise a vast organisation which then proceeds to indoctrinate the British (and international) viewing and listening population with leftist orthodoxies which are ironically anti-British - TV as a medium is absorbed unreflexively and is thus the most powerful form of mass mind control ever invented.

This well written, neatly organised and flab free book can be read in one sitting.

The cumulative effect is devastating, reaching a crescendo in Chapter 8: The Moral Maze, which answered something I have long been puzzled by - that is the internationally accepted and deeply unfair myth that the Catholic Church is responsible for the spread of AIDs in sub-Saharan Africa via it's doctrine on contraception - the book traces this ludicrous piece of disinformation to it's source - a single episode of a Panorama programme called `Sex and the Holy See' broadcast on Sunday 12th October 2003. A BBC graduate himself, on a Wolfson College Press Fellowship project, provided the detailed itemisation and revelation of the systematic lies and distortion of this programme, so no claim of external bias can be made.

A copy of this book should be given gratis to everybody who comes up to pay for the TV license in the next year. Personally, I would just tell everybody to destroy their TV sets, get their minds back and rescue their children, but that isn't going to happen anytime soon.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Truth, 17 April 2009
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This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Paperback)
From a one time supporter of the BBC over the years reality has been kicking in. The BBC is deeply biased. reading this book really showed me not just that they are, but why and how. The licence fee must go.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 1 Sept. 2007
By 
A. Crabtree (London, GB) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
This is a short book, but very succinct in describing how the BBC has tended towards a single worldview, and how that view can lead the public rather than follow it.

There is much evidence of bias, for example the comparison of the BBC's headlining of Tory ministers' and MPs' affairs with the equivalent of inside pages for Robin Cook leaving his wife, followed by an account of the Governors' rejection of the author's complaints of bias, apparently accepting but not publishing BBC executives' arguments that there was no bias.

The subtle psychology of the suppression of dissent within the corporation is interestingly put, not that it can be particularly obscure that in a large organisation, those with dissenting opinions have to be careful (I suppose the important distinction is that this organisation's business is news, fact, opinion, etc., so such suppression would be worse than for others.)

A chapter with anonymous remarks from BBC journalists backs up these discussions. Of course you have to decide whether the anonymity means the remarks are merely disgruntled, or really because their owners don't dare articulate them.

There is an excellent chapter, remarked on by another reviewer, about the Panorama about the Phillipines and the Catholic church -"Sex and the Holy City", which seems to be an extreme example of bias, running to outright invention, and the author's conservative argument against this is fantastic. You can still see a large "Your Comments" page about this on the BBC's website, showing how appalled many viewers were with the church. What's interesting about that page is that the viewers would probably not have felt so strongly had they read an equivalent report in the press, because the Guardian (or the Daily Mail for that matter) do not promise balance and impartiality. In other words viewers trust the BBC and listen and watch uncritically.

Which was to me the main point to come out - I would love to watch different, openly biased programmes and channels, the way I can read the Guardian and Daily Telegraph.

Another book on the subject very well worth reading, is "Scrap the BBC!" by Richard D North.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The BBC looks like a Marxist propaganda organ, 11 Jun. 2008
By 
Richard Perrott (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Paperback)
No, we cannot trust the BBC.

This author is correct, I have noticed a dramatic decline in the quality and relevance of BBC programming, and the rise in absurdly Marxist, Political Class, Multi-Cultural, Collectivist biased reporting. The privately owned Channel 4 has shamed the BBC for many years with _much_ higher quality, radical programming and reporting (like Dispatches), even SKY offers better programming and reporting!

The idea of a national broadcaster, like the BBC, seems bearable provided it is impartial and offers value for money, but becomes pointless and evil as it is taken over by collectivists.

I think that that the BBC TV tax must cease (to remove the extortion and enforce financial reality) and that the BBC should either have a wholesale staff replacement (excluding adverts in the Guardian and the Independent), or be closed and any worthwhile assets be moved into a trust, with free UK public access, and chargeable foreign and private access.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I agree: we need a non-p.c. alternative to Radio 4, 9 Oct. 2008
By 
O "'" (Reading, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Paperback)
I'm very glad to find it's not just me that feels angry that we have to pay for "progressive" propaganda if we want to own a telly.
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58 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Purity of delusion, 20 Mar. 2007
This review is from: Can We Trust the BBC? (Hardcover)
An excellent insiders view of BBC corruption and Institutional Prejudice. The BBC is responsible with it's coverage of Israeli/Palestinian events and by it's anti-Iraq War stance for encouraging Muslim Radicalism around the world and especially in the UK. The bombs of 7/7 and other attempts can be traced back to the BBC's lack of willingness to challenge Muslim dogma, prejudices and preconceptions. The BBC incites anti-semitism by it's anti-Israeli stance and ironically increases support for the BNP by blocking all reasoned debate on issues such as Islam in the UK, immigration and the EU.

The BBC's willingness to show the video of Ken Bigley 'fulfilled the terrorist's aims' in the words of a BBC journalist and can be seen as partly responsible for his kidnap and death by beheading, trying to use Ken Bigley to embarrass Blair.

The BBC's anti-Israeli stance was confirmed in an internal BBC report, the Balen Report, which the BBC refuses to publish as it condemns it's own journalists as the cause of increasing radicalism in the Muslim community due to the picture they paint of Israeli 'aggression' against Palestinians.

The BBC is the world's most powerful broadcaster and has the ability to change the Public's views on events such as the Iraq war. It therefore acts as an unelected 'Parliamentary Opposition' (in the words of Sir Simon Jenkins) and can effect events world wide changing Government behaviour.

It is also unaccountable for it's actions and seems determined to provide misleading information and indeed manufacture News if it deems, in it's own opinion, that it is in the public good.

The BBC should be broken up and reformed in a manner that represents the views of the community as a whole and not merely that of the metropolitan 'elite'.

The RUC in Northern Ireland were reconstructed to be representative of all colours and creeds in Northern Ireland and the time has come for a similar initiative to replace the outdated dogmas of the BBC left wingers with as more inclusive coverage of world events.
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Can We Trust the BBC? by Robin Aitken (Hardcover - 2 Oct. 2007)
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