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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative, 19 Oct. 2013
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This review is from: Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts) (Paperback)
Gilles Deleuze one of the key figures in poststructuralism, and one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. The book articulates a profound critique of the philosophy of representation while constructing a metaphysics of difference freed from subordination to a logic of identity. While charting the development through the history of philosophy of the concepts of ' pure difference and ' complex repetition, Deleuze proposes a new image of thought, which readers familiar with his later works will recognise. A difficult and challenging text that has done as much as any to initiate the philosophy of difference that characterizes much recent French thought, this book is one of the classics of recent European philosophy.
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43 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grounding a Philosophy of Difference, 31 Jan. 2004
By 
Panayotis ZAMAROS (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is (arguably) the most important work written by Deleuze for a reason that seems to me is often obscured or merely forgotten: it is (maybe) the only work that seeks to lay the foundation for a systematic treatment of ‘difference’ and by ex-tension (or in-tension) ‘repetition’. It does not seek to derive ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ (simply) from identity and the in-dividual. It seeks to think of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ in themselves. And this is what is important here: thinking (and not some petty play of figures and words in the frontal attacks or soul mating with particular thinkers) in its rhizomatic form rather than its arborescent one.
What is therefore central in this work is ‘idea’, and (therefore) ‘perception’. In simple terms, Deleuze has managed to provide some foundational links with the philosophies of mind, language and time. He has given to the philosophy of difference a central and unifying role (across such and other disciplines) to play.
In this sense ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ are not only linked between them (in the sense that one leads to the other), but also linked with other important notions usually discussed in other disciplines. Let me give some brief indications.
Chapter 1 is concerned with ‘difference’, not as mere ‘diversity’, ‘otherness’ or ‘negation’, bur rather as ‘general’ or ‘specific’ where the latter is the moment when difference is reconciled with the concept in general. In this manner, Deleuze sees ‘difference’ as a concept of reflection in relation to ‘representation’ that involves ‘movement’. He further discusses the notion of ‘eternal return’ and questions the adoption of a ‘meta-viewpoint’ for thinking about ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ - the latter being seen as the relation between originals and simulacra.
In chapter 2 Deleuze lays out the relation between ‘repetition’ and ‘sensing’, ‘habit’, and ‘difference’, in the sense that "difference inhabits repetition", in that it "lies between two repetitions" (p.76). Deleuze also makes the distinction between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ signs, hence the distinction between two types of ‘difference’, one being the expression of the other. In parallel, he distinguishes ‘active’ from ‘passive’ synthesis (relative to time) in that "the activity of thought applies to a receptive being, to a passive subject" (p.86). Finally drawing on Bergson he distinguishes the ‘real’ centre from where emanates a series of ‘perception-images’ from a ‘virtual’ centre from where emanates a series of ‘memory-images’.
Chapter 3 is for Deleuze the most important (sic) because the thinking of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ is based on a dogmatic image of thought characterised by eight postulates, each with a dual form, the artificial and the natural.
In Chapter 4, this duality underlies the development of the notion of ‘idea’ in that it is problematic, hence dialectical, an "n-dimensional, continuous, defined multiplicity" (p.182) in a ‘perplication’ as the distinctive and coexistent state of ideas. Each ‘idea’ is thus linked with ‘difference’ and ‘representation’ in that "the representation of difference refers to the identity of the concept as its principle" (p.178). In this manner Deleuze makes the claim for the superiority of problematic-questioning approach over the (traditional) hypothetico-apodictic approach because questions are imperatives.
Chapter 5 starts with the claim that "difference is not diversity. Diversity is given, but difference is that by which the given is given, that by which the given is given as diverse" (p.222). Difference is therefore (a given) ‘intensity’ expressed as ‘extensity’. There is ‘depth’ that unites intensity and extensity. Therefore, ‘depth’ is the intensity of being from where emerge at once extensity and the qualities of being. In this manner Deleuze accepts a dual condition of difference: one natural and one artificial.
In the concluding chapter Deleuze argues that representation is a site of transcendental illusion which comes in four interrelated forms relative to ‘thought’, ‘sensibility’, ‘idea’ and ‘being’. Hence the problematic of grounding ‘representation’ and his argument for groundlessness and justification of the use of (systems of) simulacra as sites for the actualisation of ideas. Hence that of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ where the former is not only located between the levels and degrees of the latter but also has two faces, namely, habit and memory.
Overall, despite the difficulty of the text itself as it takes for granted knowledge of the philosophies of some other thinkers, it is a central text in the philosophy of difference and for just this reason, a text one must have read!
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading with preparation., 7 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts) (Paperback)
Prepare with an Introduction to Mathematical Philosophy, by Bertrand Russel, and Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, the 1781 edition, or a synopsis.
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8 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grounding a Philosophy of Difference, 31 Jan. 2004
By 
Panayotis ZAMAROS (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is (arguably) the most important work written by Deleuze for a reason that seems to me is often obscured or merely forgotten: it is (maybe) the only work that seeks to lay the foundation for a systematic treatment of 'difference' and by ex-tension (or in-tension) 'repetition'. It does not seek to derive 'difference' and 'repetition' (simply) from identity and the in-dividual. It seeks to think of 'difference' and 'repetition' in themselves. And this is what is important here: thinking (and not some petty play of figures and words in the frontal attacks or soul mating with particular thinkers) in its rhizomatic form rather than its arborescent one.
What is therefore central in this work is 'idea', and (therefore) 'perception'. In simple terms, Deleuze has managed to provide some foundational links with the philosophies of mind, language and time. He has given to the philosophy of difference a central and unifying role (across such and other disciplines) to play.
In this sense 'difference' and 'repetition' are not only linked between them (in the sense that one leads to the other), but also linked with other important notions usually discussed in other disciplines. Let me give some brief indications.
Chapter 1 is concerned with 'difference', not as mere 'diversity', 'otherness' or 'negation', bur rather as 'general' or 'specific' where the latter is the moment when difference is reconciled with the concept in general. In this manner, Deleuze sees 'difference' as a concept of reflection in relation to 'representation' that involves 'movement'. He further discusses the notion of 'eternal return' and questions the adoption of a 'meta-viewpoint' for thinking about 'difference' and 'repetition' - the latter being seen as the relation between originals and simulacra.
In chapter 2 Deleuze lays out the relation between 'repetition' and 'sensing', 'habit', and 'difference', in the sense that "difference inhabits repetition", in that it "lies between two repetitions" (p.76). Deleuze also makes the distinction between 'natural' and 'artificial' signs, hence the distinction between two types of 'difference', one being the expression of the other. In parallel, he distinguishes 'active' from 'passive' synthesis (relative to time) in that "the activity of thought applies to a receptive being, to a passive subject" (p.86). Finally drawing on Bergson he distinguishes the 'real' centre from where emanates a series of 'perception-images' from a 'virtual' centre from where emanates a series of 'memory-images'.
Chapter 3 is for Deleuze the most important (sic) because the thinking of 'difference' and 'repetition' is based on a dogmatic image of thought characterised by eight postulates, each with a dual form, the artificial and the natural.
In Chapter 4, this duality underlies the development of the notion of 'idea' in that it is problematic, hence dialectical, an "n-dimensional, continuous, defined multiplicity" (p.182) in a 'perplication' as the distinctive and coexistent state of ideas. Each 'idea' is thus linked with 'difference' and 'representation' in that "the representation of difference refers to the identity of the concept as its principle" (p.178). In this manner Deleuze makes the claim for the superiority of problematic-questioning approach over the (traditional) hypothetico-apodictic approach because questions are imperatives.
Chapter 5 starts with the claim that "difference is not diversity. Diversity is given, but difference is that by which the given is given, that by which the given is given as diverse" (p.222). Difference is therefore (a given) 'intensity' expressed as 'extensity'. There is 'depth' that unites intensity and extensity. Therefore, 'depth' is the intensity of being from where emerge at once extensity and the qualities of being. In this manner Deleuze accepts a dual condition of difference: one natural and one artificial.
In the concluding chapter Deleuze argues that representation is a site of transcendental illusion which comes in four interrelated forms relative to 'thought', 'sensibility', 'idea' and 'being'. Hence the problematic of grounding 'representation' and his argument for groundlessness and justification of the use of (systems of) simulacra as sites for the actualisation of ideas. Hence that of 'difference' and 'repetition' where the former is not only located between the levels and degrees of the latter but also has two faces, namely, habit and memory.
Overall, despite the difficulty of the text itself as it takes for granted knowledge of the philosophies of some other thinkers, it is a central text in the philosophy of difference and for just this reason, a text one must have read!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 27 Nov. 2014
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This review is from: Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts) (Paperback)
Excellent
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 28 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts) (Paperback)
Very quick service and exactly as described
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2 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Grounding a Philosophy of Difference, 31 Jan. 2004
By 
Panayotis ZAMAROS (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is (arguably) the most important work written by Deleuze for a reason that seems to me is often obscured or merely forgotten: it is (maybe) the only work that seeks to lay the foundation for a systematic treatment of ‘difference’ and by ex-tension (or in-tension) ‘repetition’. It does not seek to derive ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ (simply) from identity and the in-dividual. It seeks to think of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ in themselves. And this is what is important here: thinking (and not some petty play of figures and words in the frontal attacks or soul mating with particular thinkers) in its rhizomatic form rather than its arborescent one.
What is therefore central in this work is ‘idea’, and (therefore) ‘perception’. In simple terms, Deleuze has managed to provide some foundational links with the philosophies of mind, language and time. He has given to the philosophy of difference a central and unifying role (across such and other disciplines) to play.
In this sense ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ are not only linked between them (in the sense that one leads to the other), but also linked with other important notions usually discussed in other disciplines. Let me give some brief indications.
Chapter 1 is concerned with ‘difference’, not as mere ‘diversity’, ‘otherness’ or ‘negation’, bur rather as ‘general’ or ‘specific’ where the latter is the moment when difference is reconciled with the concept in general. In this manner, Deleuze sees ‘difference’ as a concept of reflection in relation to ‘representation’ that involves ‘movement’. He further discusses the notion of ‘eternal return’ and questions the adoption of a ‘meta-viewpoint’ for thinking about ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ - the latter being seen as the relation between originals and simulacra.
In chapter 2 Deleuze lays out the relation between ‘repetition’ and ‘sensing’, ‘habit’, and ‘difference’, in the sense that "difference inhabits repetition", in that it "lies between two repetitions" (p.76). Deleuze also makes the distinction between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’ signs, hence the distinction between two types of ‘difference’, one being the expression of the other. In parallel, he distinguishes ‘active’ from ‘passive’ synthesis (relative to time) in that "the activity of thought applies to a receptive being, to a passive subject" (p.86). Finally drawing on Bergson he distinguishes the ‘real’ centre from where emanates a series of ‘perception-images’ from a ‘virtual’ centre from where emanates a series of ‘memory-images’.
Chapter 3 is for Deleuze the most important (sic) because the thinking of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ is based on a dogmatic image of thought characterised by eight postulates, each with a dual form, the artificial and the natural.
In Chapter 4, this duality underlies the development of the notion of ‘idea’ in that it is problematic, hence dialectical, an "n-dimensional, continuous, defined multiplicity" (p.182) in a ‘perplication’ as the distinctive and coexistent state of ideas. Each ‘idea’ is thus linked with ‘difference’ and ‘representation’ in that "the representation of difference refers to the identity of the concept as its principle" (p.178). In this manner Deleuze makes the claim for the superiority of problematic-questioning approach over the (traditional) hypothetico-apodictic approach because questions are imperatives.
Chapter 5 starts with the claim that "difference is not diversity. Diversity is given, but difference is that by which the given is given, that by which the given is given as diverse" (p.222). Difference is therefore (a given) ‘intensity’ expressed as ‘extensity’. There is ‘depth’ that unites intensity and extensity. Therefore, ‘depth’ is the intensity of being from where emerge at once extensity and the qualities of being. In this manner Deleuze accepts a dual condition of difference: one natural and one artificial.
In the concluding chapter Deleuze argues that representation is a site of transcendental illusion which comes in four interrelated forms relative to ‘thought’, ‘sensibility’, ‘idea’ and ‘being’. Hence the problematic of grounding ‘representation’ and his argument for groundlessness and justification of the use of (systems of) simulacra as sites for the actualisation of ideas. Hence that of ‘difference’ and ‘repetition’ where the former is not only located between the levels and degrees of the latter but also has two faces, namely, habit and memory.
Overall, despite the difficulty of the text itself as it takes for granted knowledge of the philosophies of some other thinkers, it is a central text in the philosophy of difference and for just this reason, a text one must have read!
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6 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Deleuzian Century, 2 May 2003
By A Customer
The ontological relativity advocated here is inseparable from an enunciative relativity. Knowledge of a Universe, Deleuze maintains, is only possible through the mediation of autopoietic machines. A zone of self-belonging needs to exist for the coming into cognitive existence of any being or modality of being. And it is the same for their enunciative coordinates. The relativity of points of view of space, time and energy does not, for all that, absorb the real into the dream. Residual objectivity is what resists scanning by the infinite variation of points of view constitutable upon it. Existential machines are at the same level as being in its intrinsic multiplicity. They are not mediated by transcendent signifiers or subsumed by a univocal ontological foundation. They are to themselves their own material of semiotic expression. Existence, as a process of deterritorialisation, is a specific inter-machinic operation which superimposes itself on the promotion of singularised existential intensities. And, as Deleuze clearly shows, there is no generalised syntax for these deterritorialisations. Existence is not dialectical, not representable.
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Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts)
Difference and Repetition (Continuum Impacts) (Continuum Impacts) by Gilles Deleuze (Paperback - 18 Nov. 2004)
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