Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Shoppers...we're gonna get you for doing this to us' UBSC local 501*
Flick through this book and many of you might think Julian Montague needs to get a life, roaming round the North Eastern states snapping the death throes of shopping carts, indeed. The book is a bit of fun though and quite cleverly thought out, but maybe the joke wears a bit thin by page 176.

The five sections explain all you'll need to know to about...
Published on 9 April 2006 by Robin Benson

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as I expected
This book works on two levels. On one hand, it is a parody of the classifications that are used in sciences, such as the classifications of plants and animals. On the other hand, it is a photography book that shows shopping carts in different environments.

From my (European) point of view, the book works much better as a photography book. It shows the kind of...
Published 22 months ago by E.M. Marin


Most Helpful First | Newest First

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Shoppers...we're gonna get you for doing this to us' UBSC local 501*, 9 April 2006
By 
Robin Benson - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
Flick through this book and many of you might think Julian Montague needs to get a life, roaming round the North Eastern states snapping the death throes of shopping carts, indeed. The book is a bit of fun though and quite cleverly thought out, but maybe the joke wears a bit thin by page 176.

The five sections explain all you'll need to know to about classifying carts, section two lists Class A: False Strays, Types 1-11 and section three Class B: True Strays, Types 1-22. Each type gets a page with a cool photo and details about what to look for. The longest section is four, titled Selected Specimens, with more than three hundred photos of battered and dead carts in the environment, I think the ones in snow look best and they are categorized according to either Class A or B. It won't surprise you to know that the author toiled for six years creating all this.

The design and printing of the book is fine and the author takes a pretty good cart photo. The only thing missing, I thought, was some reference to their manufactures, there can't be too many and they most likely all have unique features. This would certainly have added to the thrill of spotting a Class B, Type 11 (train damaged cart) made by A N Other Inc.

*United Brotherhood of Shopping Carts. Affiliated to AFL/CIO.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as I expected, 24 Dec 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
This book works on two levels. On one hand, it is a parody of the classifications that are used in sciences, such as the classifications of plants and animals. On the other hand, it is a photography book that shows shopping carts in different environments.

From my (European) point of view, the book works much better as a photography book. It shows the kind of American suburbia and nature that you rarely see on TV: abandoned buildings, garbage lots and industrial areas. Many of the pictures are also taken during the fall, winter or spring, when the nature of this area is quite dead and ugly, including the occasional piles of dirty snow. Some of the pictures also show something essential about American culture and values: a shopping cart abandoned next to a building, and on the building wall, there's a poster that reads "BUFFALO FOR JESUS". A shopping cart in some private person's garage, and in the background, there's a sign that reads "WELCOME HOME JOHN" - considering the star decorations in it, perhaps it was a greeting for a soldier who was coming back home from the other side of the world. And then it ended up in the garage among all sorts of junk.

The humor doesn't work very well, though. Although the classifications for shopping carts are insightful as such, the descriptions tend to be rather dry.

I was also expecting some sort of social analysis of the life cycle of shopping carts, perhaps also something about their history. But there is none. And in the end, many of the photos are quite similar too. A lone, broken shopping cart on the top of a dirty pile of snow; I feel that I should see some human characteristics in it. But I don't. In that sense, many of the pictures don't quite deliver what I expected, either.

This book is essential for anyone who collects weird books just for the heck of it. But others might pass - there are funnier things out there, and if you are looking for artistic photography, there are many better books available in that genre too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SHOPPING CARTS HAVE FEELINGS TOO, 22 Mar 2013
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
With the pressures nowadays that shopping carts have to endure it is no wonder that many flee their natural homes to seek escape in the wilds.

The POCTSCS (Prevention Of Cruelty To Shopping Carts Society) was formed to combat this mistreatment.

We are a non profit organisation dedicated to the welfare of all shopping carts worldwide.

Remember, a shopping cart is not just for Xmas, but for all year round.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 5 Oct 2009
By 
Hugh Gifford - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
Superb photography, beautiful imagery, a well thought-out classification system and a thoroughly warming experience. I laughed out loud and bought one for my sister's birthday.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thank you, thank you, thank you!, 29 Nov 2013
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
At last, someone has recognised the tracking down,identifying and cataloguing of shopping trolleys for the legitimate hobby that it so clearly is. My wife and I would often come across examples of this bastion of modern design in our daily walks and, although she has just recently and completely unexpectedly run off with the butcher( I believe the responsibility of this important work must have weighed too heavily on her), my walks now have purpose, and I can concentrate fully on maintaining my fast growing library, listing by location, date, manufacturer, classification etc, each trolley I discover. I cannot thank Mr. Montague enough for opening up a whole new exciting world to me and it has been months since I have devoted any time to my previous hobby of photographing pylons.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I'm surprised that people were disappointed from that point of view, 12 Aug 2014
By 
Mr. J. Gomm (Leeds, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
This is a superb book. It's not "funny", I'm surprised that people were disappointed from that point of view. I think it's fascinating and beautiful. Every photo is an untold story of mundane human life. Suitable for the kind of people who enjoy flicking through encyclopedia or natural history books or similar.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliantly weird and sustained, 5 April 2014
By 
S. Rouse (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
I'm not really sure what 'Stray Shopping Carts. . .' is, but I'm glad it exists. I mainly see it as a brilliantly conceived photo essay; perhaps an assignment that got wonderfully out of control. What really makes it work is the obsessive and detailed nature of the project, with its classification systems. Don't be put off, it's worth every penny. It's also a great book to read in public - the double takes are great :)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 19 Sep 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification (Paperback)
Both thumbs UP!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification
£9.95
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews