Customer Reviews


8 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Tycoons
`The Tycoons' is a look at the life of four American giants of industry and the effect they have had on the American economy. It looks at Carnegie (Steel), Gould (Railways), Rockefeller (Oil) and Morgan (Banking), all key components of society and economy in the years after the civil war. It also looks at the life and times of these men in general and the growth of the...
Published on 24 Mar 2010 by Spider Monkey

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Industrialisation of America starring some well know people
This is not a definitive work on the four Tycoons headlined on the cover, but it is an interesting social history of America either side of the start of the twentieth century. The three industrialists play a significant part in that history, but so do many others that are not featured. The author clearly considered that the story of American industrial development could...
Published on 18 Feb 2012 by Duncan Gray


Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Tycoons, 24 Mar 2010
By 
Spider Monkey (UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
`The Tycoons' is a look at the life of four American giants of industry and the effect they have had on the American economy. It looks at Carnegie (Steel), Gould (Railways), Rockefeller (Oil) and Morgan (Banking), all key components of society and economy in the years after the civil war. It also looks at the life and times of these men in general and the growth of the consumer society in America. This book can be a little dry at times, especially when it goes off on a tangent and takes a while to get back to the main theme of the book. It is worth noting that this is in no way a dedicated biography of each man and to be honest it would have been a lot better if it had been, as these are the most fascinating parts of the book. There are numerous photos throughout that illustrate the various points raised, as well as comprehensive Appendices and Notes. The worst part of the book is the unfocused and protracted ending, for some reason it looks at a man (Taylor) who's ideas were discounted and later overlooked and goes into great detail about his exploits, it also didn't relate very well to the rest of the book. After a fascinating book it was frankly ruined by the lack of satisfactory conclusion or final remarks to tie everything together. If this piqued your interest then I can heartily recommend `Carnegie' by Peter Krass which is an excellent biography. All in all this an interesting book, that is engaging and relatively easy to read, the only flaw is the unfocused ending that will leave you mildly frustrated.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Unwitting Sculptors Of The American Super Industrial Model, 2 Aug 2007
By 
DOPPLEGANGER (TEDDY B) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
They created their industrial and financial bases for a variety of reasons, the overriding being personal greed and to quench an insatiable thirst for personal power. 'For the good of humanity' whilst never a deliberate intention was, nevertheless, an accidental by-product of The Tycoons nefarious wheeling and dealing in pursuit of wealth and dominance.

Charles Morris tells the comprehensive but not unnecesarily over-detailed account of The Tycoons sometimes individual and sometimes overlapping commercial machinations. The result is a highly readable and interesting account of a pivotal period in the evolution of The American Supereconomy.

When their unethical practices were at last outlawed by the State, there at least remained a framework upon which, with good governance and improving management techniques, others were able to make The United States of America into the World's greatest trading nation. For that The Tycoons are owed a debt of gratitude if not affection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Industrialisation of America starring some well know people, 18 Feb 2012
By 
Duncan Gray (York, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
This is not a definitive work on the four Tycoons headlined on the cover, but it is an interesting social history of America either side of the start of the twentieth century. The three industrialists play a significant part in that history, but so do many others that are not featured. The author clearly considered that the story of American industrial development could not be told without mentioning Pierpont Morgan but didn't seem to be clear on what part he should credited with. On the other hand Henry Ford and many others get no more than a passing mention. The story is nonetheless well worth reading. Well two thirds of it is. The last part, when the Tycoons have been retired, loses its way and becomes a management book on how much better productivity is in the US than in the UK and most of the industrial world at that point (meaning Germany). The book is an interesting read but is not an authoritative work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An Illuminating read., 14 Jun 2013
By 
M. B. Walsh - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
Anyone curious about how ruthless. determined and driven men can build a nation would do well to read this informative and well researched book. It opened my eyes and gave me a better understanding of the way things worked, and still work in the world of finance and commerce.

Well worth the price of admission.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting History, 23 July 2010
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
The Tycoons is a particularly interesting history of America in the mid to late 1800's and the role played by 4 key industrialists. I actually purchased the book thinking it soley focussed on the four mian men however the book intersperses interesting chapters about America at the time as long with a history of each man. This I feel benefits the book immensely creating a totally engaging narrative for the history of each individual. Highly Recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT, 28 July 2014
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
This book is so so so brilliant - Only God knows why I hadn't read it earlier. Have even ordered copies for friends! An excellent book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring and off-point, 30 July 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
The author spends too much time trying to show his knowledge of the economic and social history of the time, and not enough time explaining how the core subjects of the book made their fortune. The result is that the book often goes off-track, and the author ends up rambling. The title of the book is 'The Tycoons'. When you strip out the waffle, it leaves too few pages devoted to how the main subjects made their fortune. It felt like only 20 pages of worthwhile information was included about each main subject of the book. In comparison, a few years ago I read a book about Cornelius VanderBilt, that was hundreds of pages long and almost all relevant an on-point. Unfortunately I can not remember the name of that book, or its author, otherwise I would recommend it in place of 'The Tycoons'.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars old school, 12 Feb 2010
By 
R. M. Bullock - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Tycoons: How Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller, Jay Gould, and J.P. Morgan Invented the American Supereconomy (Paperback)
Fairly good book; quite interesting history of the US but it does get a bit difficult to read in terms of irrelevant information. Nevertheless it was enjoyable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews