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5.0 out of 5 stars Mind expanding, faith deepening
As one who approached Christianity late in life after being steeped in a scientific, reductionist world view I found this book very powerful in reconciling rigorous science with a broader and deeper reality. I now appreciate the wonders of science in a fuller way that embraces rather than ignores the Creator of the natural order. It brought science to life again after I...
Published 1 month ago by J. L. Sears

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2.0 out of 5 stars not very good
The book is quite readable, but it gets very boring and religious, at the end. Hugh is an Old Earth Creationist, which is very similar to the standard evolutionary model of origins, without the added bit of evolution. The days of Genesis are not literal, but are like markers for ages, many millions of years in duration. Hugh illustrates that the ancients had a primitive...
Published on 8 Feb. 2013 by Amazon Customer


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5.0 out of 5 stars Mind expanding, faith deepening, 24 April 2015
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J. L. Sears (Hertfordshire, England) - See all my reviews
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As one who approached Christianity late in life after being steeped in a scientific, reductionist world view I found this book very powerful in reconciling rigorous science with a broader and deeper reality. I now appreciate the wonders of science in a fuller way that embraces rather than ignores the Creator of the natural order. It brought science to life again after I had began to find it sterile and dehumanizing.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I highly recommend it if you want a better understanding of this ..., 9 Dec. 2014
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This review is from: Hidden Treasures in the Book of Job: How the Oldest Book in the Bible Answers Today's Scientific Questions (Paperback)
Examines the book of Job from a perspective rarely seen. A most interesting read and one that deals faithfully with what the book actually says. I highly recommend it if you want a better understanding of this rather difficult OT book. Hugh Ross' exposition of the creation narrative in Job is outstanding - it puts the Genesis 1-2 account into perspective.
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4.0 out of 5 stars clever and reasonably clear, 26 Jun. 2014
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Some of the reasoning assumes the reader is well versed in the topic. Very interesting but requires full attention and some re-reading in parts.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not very good, 8 Feb. 2013
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The book is quite readable, but it gets very boring and religious, at the end. Hugh is an Old Earth Creationist, which is very similar to the standard evolutionary model of origins, without the added bit of evolution. The days of Genesis are not literal, but are like markers for ages, many millions of years in duration. Hugh illustrates that the ancients had a primitive cosmology; there was a primordial ocean, out of which came the disc of the earth, like order out of chaos, probably going back to Sumerian creation myth, (in my opinion) with Tiamat as the goddess of chaos. And then the waters were separated (sorry, before the earth disc emerges) and it goes up, with a space in the middle called the firmament, it is the same in Genesis 1, the waters above and below, and to my simple mind, that shows that it was probably based on the very similar Sumerian cosmology.
There is a bit in Job which actually mentions the firmament being as a polished brass, solid dome, like a mirror, but Hugh says that it is only `as' a brass dome, but that's a bit too much of a coincidence for me to write off like that, and perhaps in truth it shows that the writer of Job (whoever that was) probably had the same sort of ancient cosmology model as everyone else, way back in those days.
Although Hugh illustrates this ancient cosmology model, he doesn't make the connection with the Genesis account. Hugh sees the Genesis 1 account as a matter of perspective; you need to see it from the perspective of someone on the earth, and not from our perspective of looking at the planet from space. I don't really buy that explanation; I see the Genesis account from a plain reading of it, a Sumerian creation myth, transposed into a Hebrew religious understanding.
Hugh is very predictable, very similar to what you would get from a standard evolutionist; the Behemoth is a hippo, and Leviathan is a crocodile. I don't personally think that Behemoth was a hippo, but Leviathan might have been a croc. Neanderthals were non-human primates, according to Hugh, despite their bigger brains than modern humans. I found some of the astronomy interesting, but the constant talk about Job (I suppose you'd expect that, with a book on Job) but it is rather boring; I thought it would be a lot more about science in the book of Job, not so much religious truth, supposedly contained in this very ancient philosophical treatise. I don't believe that Job and his friends were real people, but it is just a framework to toss about ideas about why there is so much evil, but nothing is really resolved in the book of Job, but Hugh thinks that there are profound truths contained, but his thesis doesn't impress, or maybe I had just lost interest in this type of eulogy.
I am hoping for more from his other books on astronomy. According to Hugh, the flood was local, and flooded the areas of Mesopotamia, Persia and Arabia, but he gives no evidence for this opinion.
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