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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie – The Mystery of the Blue Train | Review
The Queen of Crime is back with another classic tale of murder and intrigue, in which the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot investigates the murder of a millionaire’s daughter and the theft of her valuable diamonds. It’s a similar story-line to most of Christie’s other work, but there are a couple of things to make this particular novel stand out...
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie can do far better
The Mystery of the Blue Train is one of Christie's longer Poirot books. I thought that I was in for a riveting mystery full of revelations, twists and turns but I was seriously dissappointed.
Christie's book is a dull, sleep-inducing piece of work. The mystery itself is uninterested as are the suspects and other characters. Even Poirot does nothing but have chats...
Published on 30 July 2004 by Paul Wrench


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie – The Mystery of the Blue Train | Review, 16 April 2014
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The Queen of Crime is back with another classic tale of murder and intrigue, in which the Belgian detective Hercule Poirot investigates the murder of a millionaire’s daughter and the theft of her valuable diamonds. It’s a similar story-line to most of Christie’s other work, but there are a couple of things to make this particular novel stand out.

The characterisation, for example, is fantastic – each character is believable and easy to relate to, even eighty five years after its publication. Sure, there’s no real equivalent to the eponymous ‘blue train’ (unless you count the Eurostar), but it’s easy to picture the train as it chugs across Europe with a murderer on board.

It’s also easy to read – I powered through it with a constant headache, and though I didn’t see the ending coming, I had a good guess. That’s exactly what you want from a detective story – it keeps you on tenterhooks throughout, then delivers the coup de grace at just the right time to keep you interested and engaged throughout.

Miss Christie wrote over ninety novels (though some were under her pen name of Mary Westmacott) and you’re hardly spoiled for choice, so start elsewhere and move on to this when you’re ready.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Train Travel with Agatha Christie., 10 May 2005
By 
John Austin "austinjr@bigpond.net.au" (Kangaroo Ground, Australia) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Luxury trains travelling to holiday resorts provided an irresistible setting for novelists and filmmakers in the decades between the two world wars. Agatha Christie's 1928 murder mystery features the Blue Train, travelling across France to the Riviera, and a cast of travellers that includes Hercule Poirot.
There has to be motivation for the murder that occurs, and so expect a lot of business concerning precious jewels, international intrigues and complicated human relationships. There is also a former lady's companion who has lived for several years at that famous Christie location, St Mary Mead. She is not Miss Marple.
Agatha Christie considered this her worst novel. Colouring her judgment were recollections of several unhappy events in her own life that occurred during the time she wrote it: the breakdown of her Christie marriage and the death of her mother. I think its best quality is the considerable exposure it gives to Hercule Poirot. Seldom is he seen in the pages of an Agatha Christie novel as much as in "The Mystery of the Blue Train".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Mystery of the Blue Train........A Poirot Mystery, 21 Oct. 2012
Oh this was so so good!! The Heart of Fire, a precious gem is at the centre of this puzzle and murder most foul takes us from London to Paris then on to the South of France for this story. We are treated to jewel thieves, murderers, the filthy rich and a bunch of innocent passengers who just happen to be aboard the Blue Train, Poirot included when the first murder occurs. Employing his ittle grey cells with gusto, Poirot investigates this confusing case with his usual fussiness and flair giving us a wonderful insight into the mind of a ruthless killer and eventually bringing them to justice. Fantastic!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Christie - great as ever!, 11 Dec. 2014
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As ever well written, pacy, and a fascinating period piece to a fascinating perio of the English on the French Riveria between WW1 and WW2 ...

An equally a genuinely surprising twist at the end.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie's "The Mystery of the Blue Train", 19 Dec. 2010
As ever, I really enjoyed this. I'm really delighted with the opportunity to purchase these facsimile hardbacks - they're brilliant value and will last for years, providing entertainment.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agatha Christie can do far better, 30 July 2004
The Mystery of the Blue Train is one of Christie's longer Poirot books. I thought that I was in for a riveting mystery full of revelations, twists and turns but I was seriously dissappointed.
Christie's book is a dull, sleep-inducing piece of work. The mystery itself is uninterested as are the suspects and other characters. Even Poirot does nothing but have chats with the suspects who don't even seem to care that someone died.
The story moves at a snail's pace and even the very few moments that have anything to do with the murder won't excite you. Unlike many other Christie books, there are very few surprises throughout with almost no revelations and when Poirot FINALLY delivers the solution, it won't shock or surprise you at all.
Christie has written some superb mysteries (for some good ones, look for Death On the Nile or Murder on the Orient Express) but this is one that even the biggest fans should keep away from.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not One of her Best, 12 Aug. 2014
I have been under the impression for many years that I have read most of Agatha Christie's books yet along comes another one which I hadn't previously encountered. This is an Hercule Poirot mystery surrounding the murder of Ruth Kettering, the millionaires daughter, and the loss of her jewels.
I found this book quite difficult to get into. There are 2 very different stories at the beginning and it is in no way apparent to the reader how they will come together. I found this slightly disconcerting but continued.
I don't feel that this is one of Agatha Christie's best novels. The characters failed to come to life and were rather bland. Poirot was not as keen in solving the case as usual and the whole book lacked a certain dynamic quality that you find in a majority of her work.
I did still enjoy this book but it certainly comes amongst the very lightweight detective genre. I listened to it on audio book and despite doing other things whilst listening I was never compelled to stop what I was doing to get engrossed in the story, as often happens with audio books. I was quite happy for this story to meander along in the background without my full attention. Despite not giving my full attention to the story I had worked out the main culprit from rather early on in the book before the characters even stepped onto the blue train.
This was not one of Agatha Christie's best works and I won't trouble to read it again. May I point you in the direction of far superior works by this author such as The Seven Dials Mystery or Death on the Nile.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slightly disappointing, 14 Aug. 2011
By 
Helen S - See all my reviews
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Ruth Kettering is an American heiress who receives a set of valuable rubies as a gift from her father. Despite his warnings to keep them somewhere safe, Ruth takes the jewels with her on a trip to Nice. During her journey through France on the famous Blue Train, Ruth is found strangled to death in her compartment - and the case containing the rubies has disappeared. Hercule Poirot, who also happens to be travelling on the same train, promises to help Ruth's father solve the crime and identify the killer. Suspicion falls first on Ruth's husband, Derek Kettering, whom she had been about to divorce, and then on the mysterious Comte de la Roche. Is one of them the murderer?

I chose The Mystery of the Blue Train without really knowing anything about it. A bit of research now tells me it's one of Agatha Christie's less popular Poirot novels and now that I've read it I think I can see why. It was written quite early in her career and at a troubled time in her personal life, and apparently the author herself was unhappy with it. The book does have all the elements that should have added up to a classic Christie novel (a rich heiress, a journey on a luxury train, jewel thieves, the South of France - and Hercule Poirot himself, of course) but while I did enjoy it, I still felt there was something missing.

Compared to the other Agatha Christie books I've read, which admittedly isn't all that many, this one was much longer and seemed to take a while to really get started (the actual crime doesn't take place until about 100 pages into the book). There was a very long wait before Poirot made his first appearance and instead we spend a lot of time being introduced to other characters, which would have been okay had I liked these characters, but I found them a bit stereotypical, from the American millionaire to the French count to the old antiques dealer.

There were also a few sub-plots that I felt didn't really add much to the story, although I did enjoy the dialogue between Poirot and Katherine Grey, a young woman he meets on the train who becomes involved in the murder investigation. The mystery itself kept me guessing, though I think there were probably enough clues to be able to work out at least part of the solution, if you were paying more attention than I was! The Mystery of the Blue Train was entertaining in places but is probably my least favourite Christie novel so far.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nothing special, 6 Jun. 2010
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
In this adventure, Poirot investigates a murder that takes place on the 'Blue Train' - en route to the south of France. A surprising number of people who knew the victim are also aboard, and it's down to Poirot to work out who dunit.

This novel starts off a little differently to a lot of Poirot stories, with the focus on a diverse group of other characters and the great detective himself not putting in an appearance until fairly late. Almost the entire story is told from the points of view of the guest characters, with Poirot flitting in and out of their daily lives throughout. I thought it became obvious quite early in the story who the murderer was, but maybe that's just me getting better at this sort of thing.

The mystery was fairly standard fare. Poirot didn't seem to be particularly bothered about solving it, which was awkward. There was an interesting tie-in with the world of Miss Marple, and quite a collection of comic moments, particularly with a young female laughing at the outdated ideas of the elderly. Really it's a bit frustrating though as there is not a lot of action and the events don't really seem to advance the plot.

Most irritating of all is the blurb on the back of my copy, which as good as gives away the ending, and refers to a rather minor event as if it's the entire plot. Overall, it was an okay read, but nothing special, and still not nearing the best of Christie's work that I've read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not one of Agatha's best, 29 Mar. 2015
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Narrator brilliant as per usual. Story enjoyable but I do not rate it as highly as her others
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The Mystery of the Blue Train (Hercule Poirot Radio Dramas)
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