Customer Reviews


37 Reviews
5 star:
 (33)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ULTIMATE COFFEE TABLE BOOK
My obsession with mountaineering began with "Into Thin Air" by John Krakauer. From there I progressed to "The Climb" by Anatoli Boukeerev. Then came "Eiger, Wall of Death", "K2 Triumph and Tragedy", and I currently have "Everest Diary" on my wish list. "EVEREST: MOUNTAIN WITHOUT MERCY" however, is my...
Published on 21 Mar. 1999

versus
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Primer on Buddhist/Sherpa culture
After reading "Into Thin Air," I've been searching out any book or magazine article about the obsession of reaching the top of Everest. After hearing David Breashears on NPR, I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book. Maybe I expected too much. The photography is stunning, and I appreciated the technical info about the logistics of filming at high altitudes...
Published on 27 Jan. 1998


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

39 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE ULTIMATE COFFEE TABLE BOOK, 21 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
My obsession with mountaineering began with "Into Thin Air" by John Krakauer. From there I progressed to "The Climb" by Anatoli Boukeerev. Then came "Eiger, Wall of Death", "K2 Triumph and Tragedy", and I currently have "Everest Diary" on my wish list. "EVEREST: MOUNTAIN WITHOUT MERCY" however, is my proudest posession to date. The awe inspiring photographs and the unbiased viewpoints from the expedition members were refreshing. There is little finger-pointing in this book. While I was well aware of the IMAX team's efforts during the 1996 tragedy, I came to admire them most for the efforts involved in the filming of the movie! I was lucky to be able to attend a lecture given by David Brashears shortly after purchasing this book and the IMAX EVEREST video. He truly is a die-hard filmmaker. The shots in this book (and in the movie) are breathtaking and were obtained at great risk. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who is facinated with the stuggles of mountaineering. It combines facts (not blame) of the 1996 expeditions together with some of the most haunting photographs I have ever seen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Primer on Buddhist/Sherpa culture, 27 Jan. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
After reading "Into Thin Air," I've been searching out any book or magazine article about the obsession of reaching the top of Everest. After hearing David Breashears on NPR, I couldn't wait to get my hands on this book. Maybe I expected too much. The photography is stunning, and I appreciated the technical info about the logistics of filming at high altitudes. What I did not like was the extreme detail Coburn went into every time anyone waved a juniper branch. Fully 1/3 of the way into the book I was still reading details of every Buddhist god of every rock on the trek. I realize this faith is extremely important to the Sherpas (and also the author) but my enthusiasm for the prayers and rituals did not match Coburn's need to illuminate me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Takes you right to the Himalayas., 4 Sept. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
I don't know where I was in May 1996 that I missed out on this real life story. This book did an excellent job of recapturing the events of that month on Everest. I was transported back as if the events were happening real time. The pictures really took me there (well as close as I'll most likely ever get). I was taken in by the majesty as well as the tragedy of this story and those who lost their lives to Everest and to their insatiable desire to reach the summit. As opposed to Krakauer's book, Into Thin Air (which I read after being so enthralled with this book) I enjoyed this more impartial view and factual account of all the factors surrounding a decision to attempt a summit bid to the top of the world. After reading this book I can understand a person's desire to climb the summit but cement my own desire to climb no higher that 10 or 11,000 feet. I also enjoyed learning about the filming of an IMAX presentation. An excellent and enjoyable read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Coffee table it is, 11 Aug. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
While the other accounts of Everest 1996 focus in on Fischer'sand Hall's teams, this one focus in the the IMAX team. From the looks of it, they were the only moderates on the mountain that season. They positioned themselves for rescue efforts with the Alpine Ascents team. While everyone else was being selfish with supplies and radio's and rescue teams, Brashiers and Viesters were there to give vital oxygen, help climbers from camp 3 and coordinate the helecopter rescue of Weathers and Gao.
While the narration may not be the most riviting part of the book, the full page color pictures are. This was a film making trip for the IMAX crew so the pictures they brought back for this book were increadible. They also published Scott Fischer's pictures of summit day. I noticed one picture where Krackauer is sitting in the snow as many climbers are going up the Hillary step. It really brought to life the sceene from "Into thin Air" where he was wanting everyone to hurry up so he could get to his oxygen on the south summit.
The short stories in the middle of the book make this the ultimate coffee table book. They read like magazine articles. The other books on Everest 1996 can be checked out of a library. This is the one you want to have in your home.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The details make this more satisfying than "Into Thin Air", 12 Mar. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
Although this book does not have the emotional punch of Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air", ultimately I found it to be more satisfying mainly due to the amount of detail and the incredible photography. Without a doubt, this is a more complete accounting of the events which occurred during the May 1996 climbing season on Everest. I enjoyed the sections on Everest history, geology, cartography, Sherpa culture and religion, climbing techniques, high-altitude physiology, etc. All this detail may be annoying to some readers - this book is a serious read. Most importantly, I consider the recounting of the Rob Hall & Scott Fischer team disasters to be more objective and credible. Jon Krakauer's telling of the story is more gripping, but it is also tainted by guilt and blame due to his intimacy with the events. I recommend reading both books together - Krakauer's for the emotion, and this one other for the detail, photos, and objectivity. I can't wait to see the IMAX movie.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Companion to Into Thin Air, 10 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
I was surprised last night to look up from this book and see that the clock read 4 a.m.! I was enthralled with the story again, the same one told by Krakauer in "Into Thin Air", but found that this book, with it's amazing photography and interesting side-bars, painted a more complete picture--not of the tragedy, but of the Everest experience as a whole. I saw the IMAX movie and was disappointed, not by its content, but more by its short length. This book rounds it out, and satisfied my desire for more time atop Everest....sleep be damned!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful book, from all angles, 10 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
This book has incredible pictures, and an incredible story. I was deeply taken by the humanity and bravery of the subjects of the book. I cannot wait to see the IMAX movie that they were involved in making. I also read Into Thin Air, which was great also, but told the story from a different angle. Mountain Without Mercy is aptly named, emphasizing the deep respect the local culture has for the mountains and the gods that they believe inhabit them. This book emphasizes how humans are subject to the will of nature, and that not all areas of the world are so easily conquered. I know I will never attempt to summit Everest, but I would love to see the views from Base Camp!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AWESOME!!!, 16 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
This book is INCREDIBLE!!! First off, the pictures are so clear, and so beautiful, it gives you an idea of how AWESOME Everest really is! This is the perfect, "put in your collection to show off book." I read the book "Into Thin Air" (another awesome book) and this book should be the "pictures" of that book. GET IT!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible! Awesome! Amazing!, 10 Sept. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
This is the most beautiful book about the most beautiful, and most haunting mountain that I have read. I read "Into Thin Air" by Krakauer, and have been fascinated with mountain climbing ever since. I climbed to base camp, Camp Muir, of Mt. Rainier, and that's a pimple compared to Everest. It's amazing and I admire and respect both the climbers and the mountain. A wonderful book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Felt like I was there, 17 Nov. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) (Hardcover)
Having hiked to the Everest Base Camp some years back, the book was a journey down memory lane. While I did like the book Into Thin Air too, what a difference can the glossy pictures and the good print make.

The description of the route in the book backed up with pictures made my experience almost first hand. While capturing some of the events that somehow relate to the main story, like Tenzing and Hillary's climb in 1953, they are limited to the extent where the reader never loses track of the central plot. Also, it moves very quickly.

Particularly interesting was to read how Beck Weathers rose up from his icy grave and made it back to summit camp. I also liked the analysis of the tragedy - there were serveral points made but the author did not attempt to make any judgement.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax)
Everest: Mountain Without Mercy (Imax) by Broughton Coburn (Hardcover - 31 Mar. 1998)
Used & New from: £0.91
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews