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116 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ahead of the "experts"
Only a couple of years ago (2001), two members of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education brought out a book snappily entitled "How the Way We Talk can Change the Way we Work". It's an excellent book but it was a little strange to see it referred to by some critics as "new", and an example of "breakthrough thinking".
Why?
Because although the two...
Published on 18 Sep 2003 by Karl

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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great concept -- needs a good editor.
Charvet's concept warrants more than just a read-through of her book. I intend to study the material until I get the hang of her very sound principles. Hopefully in subsequent printings, this worthy book will receive the attention of a good editor (to catch some typos and awkward phrasing), and the trained eye of a seasoned typographer (to visually present the text...
Published on 27 May 1999


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116 of 120 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ahead of the "experts", 18 Sep 2003
By 
Karl (England, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
Only a couple of years ago (2001), two members of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education brought out a book snappily entitled "How the Way We Talk can Change the Way we Work". It's an excellent book but it was a little strange to see it referred to by some critics as "new", and an example of "breakthrough thinking".
Why?
Because although the two books are not addressing *exactly* the same area, Ms Charvet's "Words that Change Minds", first published in 1996, can readily be seen as a precursor to the later book.
Although it is usually referred to in connection with Rodger Bailey's LAB Profile work, this book is in fact based on a subset of the "meta programs", or mental filters, first identified by Leslie Lebeau (formerly Leslie Cameron-Bandler).
What makes this book so valuable is that instead of simply describing the meta programs on a purely theoretical level (as many previous authors had done), Ms Charvet places each one in a very practical context. She tells us not only the basics of each meta program but also such practical details as:
- what questions to use to elicit a person's position on any of the meta programs discussed
- how to identify what meta program positions are best suited to a given job
- and how to frame a job or product advert so that it "speaks to" the optimum audience
There is also a wealth of anecdotes from real life that illustrate the meta programs at work - like why the US was never comfortable as members of UNESCO, why a single word undermined one of IBM's big advertising campaigns, and why a Jewish mother might recommend chicken soup because "it couldn't hurt".
And on top of all that, the book is written in an enthusiastic, flowing style that makes reading it both easy and enjoyable.
Highly recommended for *anyone* who wants to understand the practicalities of how language works.
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90 of 93 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It doesn't get much better, 7 Nov 2000
By 
A. J. Bradbury "Andy B." (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
There is a well-known statistc going around which says that only 7% of a message is in the verbal content, 38% is in the vocalisation (tone, tempo, etc.) and 55% is in the body language. This might seem to imply that it doesn't really matter what words you use as long as they are more or less appropriate.
No such luck.
These statistics only apply when there is conflict between what you say and the way you say it (like saying "yes" whilst shaking your head to signal "no"). In the rest of your face-to-face communications - when you *aren't* mismatching your signals - it is actually very important that you choose your words with as much precision as possible - and this book shows you how to do just that.

In the early days of NLP, Leslie Cameron-Bandler developed what are known as the Meta Programs - Proactive/Reactive, Towards/Away From, etc. From a high of around 60, the number of active meta programs has now been halved. Rodger Bailey has identified just 13 of these which are particularly relevant to business communications, and these have become the basis for his 'LAB Profile' and what he calls 'Influencing Language'.
In this book Shelle Rose Charvet does an excellent job of describing the basic features of the LAB Profile (i.e. how to determine a person's current status in each of the 13 meta programs) and how to communicate more effectively by using the corresponding language patterns.

When I reviewed the first edition of this book I was greatly impressed, with only one significant reservation. That qualification has been cleared up in the 2nd edition, and new material has been added. The result is a book that every student of human communications needs to have on their shelf, not just to read it the once, but as a valuable reference work you'll go back to time and time again.
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59 of 62 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, accessible, practical, 14 Sep 2004
By 
Amazon Customer "Change specialist - coaching... (Manchester, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
This book presents meta-programs (the content-free filters we use to make up our model of the world) in a simple, understandable and highly readable way. It's based on the Language and Behaviour (LAB) Profile developed by Rodger Bailey - a simplification of the original 60 (!) meta-programs down to 14, along with the questions you can use to elicit them. This is a kind of psychometric test, although as people may have different meta-programs in different contexts, and they may change over time, it's not about pigeonholing people.
Shelle also tells you the kind of language to use to reach particular kinds of people - useful in sales, negotiation, motivation and deciding who to hire for a particular job. The book is chatty with a good sense of humour.
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34 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A useful guide on Language and Behaviour Profile, 26 Nov 2003
By 
M. Adamou "Marios" (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
This book can be useful for a range of professionals; from sales representatives, to clinical therapists. Mostly though, it can be incredibly helpful for Human Resource Managers during the selection and recruitment process. Don't expect huge insights to the workings of the human mind; rather a clear explanation on how what we say can be used to predict patterns of behaviour particularly in the working environment. An easy read, but not for everybody.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly valuable but..., 19 Jan 2008
By 
K. Alexander "rfdesign" (Cambridge, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
I've only given this book four stars as although it is a really valuable and really useful book that is packed with practical techniques and knowledge, it is not, unfortunately, written in a very accessable style or for someone without a good grounding in NLP.

This is really a book for the experienced NLP practitioner which is a shame because the ideas in it deserve to be available to a much less restricted readership.

NLP for Dummies and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Dummies are both excellent books so here is my plea to Shelle Rose Charvet; please write a book called "Words that change minds for Dummies" - now that would be a book I would give five stars to.
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best guide to meta-programs available, 30 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
This book presents meta-programs (the content-free filters we use to make up our model of the world) in a simple, understandable and highly readable way. It's based on the Language and Behaviour (LAB) Profile developed by Rodger Bailey - a simplification of the original 60 (!) meta-programs down to 14, along with the questions you can use to elicit them. This is a kind of psychometric test, although as people may have different meta-programs in different contexts, and they may change over time, it's not about pigeonholing people. Shelle also tells you the kind of language to use to reach particular kinds of people - useful in sales, negotiation, motivation and deciding who to hire for a particular job. The book is chatty with a good sense of humour. As an NLP trainer I recommend it!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!! needs 10 stars, 27 Aug 2007
By 
J. George "Break Up Specialist" (here, there and everywhere) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
I would recommend this book to anyone who has studied nlp or interested in the art of influence and wishes to further expand their knowledge. This books describeds meta programs in a very simple and straight forward way and how they are structured to fit the workplace, relationships (personal or professional) or any other context where you need to get yourself across efficiently and effectively.

Believe me when i say this is not a business book..it has a very readable writing style and helpful summary / appendicies section. I would recommend this book to anyone who really want's to use words that will change minds!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Common sense codified, 11 Nov 2010
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
Like a lot of NLP, from which this thinking springs, meta-programs are not well researched, so the evidence base for this book is weak. However, it makes good sense and certainly seems to work in practice. The ideas feel right, so I will label this as common sense. Why does it work. Possibly through the Forer effect or, more likely because the model forces us to listen carefully to the other person and pay them attention, the Hawthorne effect. Either way, its a useful read for NLP fans and anyone who wants to improve their communication. As with all of NLP, it costs little to try it and, if it doesn't work for you... drop it and move on.
Mike Clayton, author of Brilliant Influence: What the Most Influential People Know, Do and Say
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great concept -- needs a good editor., 27 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
Charvet's concept warrants more than just a read-through of her book. I intend to study the material until I get the hang of her very sound principles. Hopefully in subsequent printings, this worthy book will receive the attention of a good editor (to catch some typos and awkward phrasing), and the trained eye of a seasoned typographer (to visually present the text and charts in an easier-to-grasp format). It deserves the best presentation.
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile read, 8 May 2006
By 
Mr. A. PRESTON "www.andy-preston.com" (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence (Paperback)
Great for anyone who has studied NLP and wants to explore meta-programs a littile deeper. Very well put together and includes some great insights into human behaviour.

Worth a read if only to understand yourself and others a little better.
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Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence
Words That Change Minds: Mastering the Language of Influence by Shelle Rose Charvet (Paperback - 1 April 1997)
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