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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent episode in this series
The story running through issues #16-21 of the current series of Daredevil is collected as Daredevil by Mark Waid - Volume 4. The first issue sees Hank Pym running around in Daredevil’s brain trying to repair the damage caused by Doctor Doom in the previous issue, aided by Tony Stark and Doctor Strange back in ‘mission control’. There is a bit of...
Published 3 months ago by Mr. Mice Guy

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars That crazy devil!
Matt's been rescued from Doctor Doom's sensory deprivation experiments in Latveria though he's in bad shape as Doom's microscopic nanobots try to destroy his brain from the inside as Hank Pym, Stephen Strange, and Tony Stark fight to save Matt's life! Meanwhile, someone seems to be framing Matt as an unstable lunatic leading to Foggy's surprising dissolution of their law...
Published 7 months ago by Sam Quixote


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent episode in this series, 20 April 2014
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The story running through issues #16-21 of the current series of Daredevil is collected as Daredevil by Mark Waid - Volume 4. The first issue sees Hank Pym running around in Daredevil’s brain trying to repair the damage caused by Doctor Doom in the previous issue, aided by Tony Stark and Doctor Strange back in ‘mission control’. There is a bit of ‘bleed’ through Pym’s cybernetic helmet, and he gets to remember some of Matt Murdock’s life as he moves through his mission. Issue #17 is a sort of flashback as we relive the early days of Matt and Foggy’s friendship, which lays the groundwork for the rest of the stories, as the seeds are planted for the suspicion that Matt is becoming mentally unbalanced – helped along by the villain for the next four issues. Issues #18-21 sees Matt and Daredevil and Foggy and Kirsten all start to wonder just what is wrong with Daredevil, until, again with the help of Hank Pym, Daredevil works out just who is behind the plot. It turns out he isn’t right, well, not exactly, and it all gets very complicated, especially when you throw in a secondary plot to take over New York’s crime gangs by killing of the crime bosses. Eventually, of course the plot is unravelled, though we are still left wondering whether there really is an underlying problem with Matt/Daredevil…

This is another excellent episode in this series, with good scripting and artwork. Daredevil has become the most ‘human’ of Marvel’s main characters, more so than Spider-Man, for example, who has become diluted across so many different titles that he has just become a joke-machine in the Avengers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent episode in this series, 7 Feb 2014
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The story running through issues #16-21 of the current series of Daredevil is collected as Daredevil by Mark Waid - Volume 4. The first issue sees Hank Pym running around in Daredevil’s brain trying to repair the damage caused by Doctor Doom in the previous issue, aided by Tony Stark and Doctor Strange back in ‘mission control’. There is a bit of ‘bleed’ through Pym’s cybernetic helmet, and he gets to remember some of Matt Murdock’s life as he moves through his mission. Issue #17 is a sort of flashback as we relive the early days of Matt and Foggy’s friendship, which lays the groundwork for the rest of the stories, as the seeds are planted for the suspicion that Matt is becoming mentally unbalanced – helped along by the villain for the next four issues. Issues #18-21 sees Matt and Daredevil and Foggy and Kirsten all start to wonder just what is wrong with Daredevil, until, again with the help of Hank Pym, Daredevil works out just who is behind the plot. It turns out he isn’t right, well, not exactly, and it all gets very complicated, especially when you throw in a secondary plot to take over New York’s crime gangs by killing of the crime bosses. Eventually, of course the plot is unravelled, though we are still left wondering whether there really is an underlying problem with Matt/Daredevil…

This is another excellent episode in this series, with good scripting and artwork. Daredevil has become the most ‘human’ of Marvel’s main characters, more so than Spider-Man, for example, who has become diluted across so many different titles that he has just become a joke-machine in the Avengers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars That crazy devil!, 9 Dec 2013
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Daredevil by Mark Waid Volume 4 (Paperback)
Matt's been rescued from Doctor Doom's sensory deprivation experiments in Latveria though he's in bad shape as Doom's microscopic nanobots try to destroy his brain from the inside as Hank Pym, Stephen Strange, and Tony Stark fight to save Matt's life! Meanwhile, someone seems to be framing Matt as an unstable lunatic leading to Foggy's surprising dissolution of their law firm, and a new villain called Coyote is committing some heinous crimes which only Daredevil can stop!

I'm still enjoying Mark Waid's Daredevil series (that I've read four volumes of it and intend to keep going is a testament to that) but I don't see it in the same way as the majority of readers do, who praise it as one of the best Marvel titles being published at the moment - it's alright at best, really. The opening issue is a bit tedious as Hank Pym (and if, like me, you've been wondering where Ant-Man's been in the Marvel NOW! lineup, he's in this book for one issue!) fights insect robots inside Matt's brain while Tony and Stephen stand outside barking instructions.

The second issue is definitely my favourite, partly because Mike Allred illustrated it and his work is sooooooo good! A guy on stilts - brilliantly named Stilt-Man! - steals a tape from Foggy and Daredevil chases after him. It's a kinda campy issue as Daredevil goes toe-to-toe against this obscure Silver Age character but Allred's art coupled with his wife Laura's colours really makes it look utterly gorgeous. The issue has a really sweet moment as Matt is given his sight back temporarily for 30 minutes and he watches what was on the tape. If you're not totally devoid of emotion, it'll bring a tear to your eye.

The rest of the book focuses on the is he/isn't he question of Matt's sanity. Since Waid took over the title, he's made a conscious effort to make his Daredevil a chirpier and chipper chap who's left the brooding, dark `n' gritty Frank Miller-esque side to his character behind and become happy. This storyline has Foggy questioning Matt's new found outlook and whether he is happy or just pretending. It also leads to Foggy exploding on Matt, getting so worked up that he breaks up Nelson & Murdock (their law firm) which was a bit hard to swallow. After all these years of Matt's shenanigans and Foggy knowing that he's secretly Daredevil as well, yet this - this! - is the time he'll forget the craziness of Matt's life and dissolve, not just their business, but their lifelong friendship too? It seemed a bit over the top and unconvincing.

Another whacky supervillain called Coyote makes an appearance in this book, who ties into the Matt's sanity storyline, but whose appearance weirdly resembles Venom's! I'm not sure what we were supposed to feel during Daredevil's scenes with this guy - on the one hand the way Daredevil looks is kinda funny but on the other what Coyote's doing is totally despicable. When we get the crucial reveal that I'm sure was supposed to be horrific, I inadvertently laughed - but then I'm a Futurama fan.

Waid's stories in this book are sporadically hit and miss. On the one hand they can feature some excellent scenes and exchanges between characters, and on the other they can be dull and/or be filled with questionable choices. Chris Samnee's art is awesome and Allred's art is, well, Allred - if you love his art as much as me, you'll love it in his issue and make you wish he drew Daredevil full time! I'm still on board with this series but I've yet to see the brilliance that has so many comics fans overly excited with this run of Daredevil.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another excellent episode in this series, 14 Oct 2013
By 
Mr. Mice Guy (London, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The story running through issues #16-21 of the current series of Daredevil is collected as Daredevil by Mark Waid 4. The first issue sees Hank Pym running around in Daredevil's brain trying to repair the damage caused by Doctor Doom in the previous issue, aided by Tony Stark and Doctor Strange back in `mission control'. There is a bit of `bleed' through Pym's cybernetic helmet, and he gets to remember some of Matt Murdock's life as he moves through his mission. Issue #17 is a sort of flashback as we relive the early days of Matt and Foggy's friendship, which lays the groundwork for the rest of the stories, as the seeds are planted for the suspicion that Matt is becoming mentally unbalanced - helped along by the villain for the next four issues. Issues #18-21 sees Matt and Daredevil and Foggy and Kirsten all start to wonder just what is wrong with Daredevil, until, again with the help of Hank Pym, Daredevil works out just who is behind the plot. It turns out he isn't right, well, not exactly, and it al gets very complicated, especially when you throw in a secondary plot to take over New York's crime gangs by killing of the crime bosses. Eventually, of course the plot is unravelled, though we are still left wondering whether there really is an underlying problem with Matt/Daredevil...

This is another excellent episode in this series, with good scripting and artwork. Daredevil has become the most `human' of Marvel's main characters, more so than Spider-Man, for example, who has become diluted across so many different titles that he has just become a joke-machine in the Avengers.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Daredevil by Mark Waid - Vol. 4, 2 Mar 2013
By 
Paul McNamee "Rambleast Reviews" (North Ireland) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Mark Waid's on some roll, man. 21 issues into the latest volume of Daredevil and he's not put a foot wrong yet, managing to keep true to a concept he set for himself when starting the series while slowly beginning to incorporate elements of some of the runs that preceded him without compromising that vision of his own that led to numerous awards, reinvigorated interest and four precious volumes to savour over and over because they invite such frequent reappraisal.

The first of this collection's six issues, #16, is a direct follow-up to the last volume's story about Daredevil heading to Latveria and having his senses robbed by Doctor Doom's underlings. While it has some neat memory-leakage action courtesy of the fantastic-voyaging Ant-Man wandering around DD's head, it's most interesting for showing how important Matt is to his colleagues and the lengths they go to in order to fix him up again. In addition, there's some tension thrown in with Foggy, who addresses (on our behalf, I guess you could say) some of the reservations longtime readers may have had about how quickly Matt's been able to one-eighty his outlook on life after years of traumatic events and at least one actual mental breakdown.

Artists Chris Samnee and Javier Rodriguez are given the month off for the following issue which comes courtesy of Allreds Mike and Laura. Their work fits the book that well that it seems as though it was designed for them. The way Waid's been taking it since it started, well, let's just say it's a shame these three's collaboration couldn't be a regular thing because as much as I like the current team, the Allreds on Waid's Daredevil would be one of the all-time greatest creative teams in Marvel history. One issue'll do for now, though (and what an issue, with its events making what happened at the end of the previous instalment all the more devastating).

The last four of the book tell a single story and take the series back into that "wait, this is a horror comic now?" territory that Mole Man's grave-robbing antics so comfortably trod back in volume 2. The success of this little arc is that Waid convinces that Matt really could be going crazy again, which makes for great reading because the way he's been written `til now should make sure you really, really don't want to believe it. Throw in a new villain who may be an old villain, some twisted headgames, a welcome appearance from one of Matt's exes (with a poignant payoff later in the book) and the Matt/ Foggy friendship travelling a darker route faster than you'd like without the resolution you might expect and you've wrapped another 6 issues of perfect comics.

Because that's what this is: it's perfect comics. Every issue is great - there's no filler, none at all, and the pace just rolls on and on and on, leaving you wondering if it can stay this good for long. So far, no signs of stopping. The last page of this collection sets up a great Superior Spider-Man teamup (in #22) that you should really go out and buy right away instead of waiting six months for, but if you DO wait six months, I'll be sure to see you for that review, too.

***As ever, I keep an eye on the comments section, so feel free to let me know if you want to know anything about the book***
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Daredevil by Mark Waid Volume 4
Daredevil by Mark Waid Volume 4 by Chris Samnee (Paperback - 10 Sep 2013)
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