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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Day Frank Miller Out Wrote Alan Moore.
Out of all of Frank Miller and Alan Moore's stellar works for Marvel & DC Comics in the 1980s, Daredevil: Born Again by writer Frank Miller and artist David Mazzuchelli must stand out as being the most concise, the most stripped down and the most affecting tales that the revisionist trend for super heroes threw out in the mid-1980s.

Whatever was in Frank...
Published on 14 May 2011 by McRonson

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Bored again
SPOILERS

Matt Murdock's ex, Karen Page, sells out Murdock's secret identity as Daredevil to the Kingpin for an armful of junk and Murdock soon finds his life destroyed by the Kingpin's vast resources. Without a home, money, a job, and seemingly without friends, the Man Without Fear is crushed by the world spiritually and mentally and, in a desperate and hasty...
Published on 2 Jun. 2012 by Sam Quixote


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Day Frank Miller Out Wrote Alan Moore., 14 May 2011
By 
McRonson (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
Out of all of Frank Miller and Alan Moore's stellar works for Marvel & DC Comics in the 1980s, Daredevil: Born Again by writer Frank Miller and artist David Mazzuchelli must stand out as being the most concise, the most stripped down and the most affecting tales that the revisionist trend for super heroes threw out in the mid-1980s.

Whatever was in Frank Miller's tea when he co-created this Marvel masterpiece starring blind lawyer Matt Murdock and the long, slow and insidious dismantling of his personal and professional life, should be bottled up and sold to the legion of imitators that came after who couldn't quite match Miller's visionary storytelling. Myself and many of my friends at the time who were fans of Alan Moore's writing on titles for various publishers such as Marvelman, Swamp Thing, Captain Britain and Watchmen when Born Again came out originally in comic book form (Daredevil Volume.1, issues 226 - 233), there was a collective belief that Miller had finally stepped up in to the big leagues and was if not the better then certainly the equal of Alan Moore. All the more impressive since Miller's tenure as artist/writer on Daredevil from #159 - 191, followed by his highly personal tribute to the Lone Wolf & Cub stories, Ronin, for DC Comics, a 1980 Batman short story and a few Spider-man annuals (Amazing Spider-man Annuals 14 & 15 and Marvel Two-In-One #51 & #100 were superior work for hire fare).

Miller's best work by far, Born Again, achieves its impact on the reader by virtue of its understanding and manipulation of emotional themes - its depiction of the Kingpin renders the Kingpin of Crime in the most realistic terms in the Marvel Universe since Daredevil #179 (His gloating over winning Businessman of the Year award for "procuring footage of acts beyond description for a automobile distributor" place the Kingpin and his amoral ruthlessness firmly and subtly into abject reality. His torment as he realises Murdock has escaped his wrath is cinematic in the extreme; it would be hard to believe that a certain Q. Tarantino hadn't read this and felt humbled by Miller's writing genius. Ditto for the shootout in the police cell when Lois the nurse working for the Kingpin is being interviewed.

Finally, Miller's tribute to Captain America co-creator, Jack Kirby, is astonishing (Jack Kirby being deeply embroiled in an undignifiedlegal battle with Marvel Comics for recognition as one of the architects of the Marvel Universe). Faced with the corrupted, evil version of himself in the shape of Agent Simpson aka Nuke, Captain America comes face to face with the reality of modern day, corporate Reaganite America. The exchange on the rooftop between Matt (Daredevil) Murdock and the star spangled Avenger is one of the most powerful scenes in the history of comics and the final battle between the escaped Nuke and Daredevil is a Battle Royale modern cinema would be hard pressed to emulate.

In DD: Born Again, writer Frank Miller's aim was to separate the man from the hero, from the troubling contradiction between costumed vigilante and defense lawyer (Matt Murdock's day job) but this was too much for lesser writers to maintain and the character and his stories went to a limbo of mediocrity well, pretty much ever since these comics came out but that's just this reviewers personal opinion. In dramatic terms, nothing since then has ever matched this incredible piece of comic writing and art and for this reason alone, you should purchase this trade paperback edition. Simply stunning.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Miller's peak is the genre's peak, 12 Mar. 2010
By 
J. Gill (Derby,UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Comics don't get any better than this. In fact literature doesn't get better than this.
Maybe the last chapter eases up a little, but the rest is a distillation of the best of popular culture of the last 60 years.

If anything was to surpass the Lee/Kirby/Ditko era, this would be it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Daredevil Noir, 9 April 2011
By 
Michael Finn (Blackburn, Lancashire, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Collects Daredevil #226-233, an earlier Frank Miller/David Mazzucchelli collaboration issue featuring Melvin Potter (Gladiator) getting exploited again and some art layouts with Millar's scribbled on scripts. This is a pretty good book. This pairing works well together and they manage to put the noir back into Daredevil where it belongs. This wasn't the first time Murdock got worked over by The Kingpin's manipulations and it certainly wouldn't be the last but it's probably one of the best treatments of this sort of plotline. My only complaint would be: Wilson Fisk - put some damn clothes on!!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very enjoyable Daredevil Classic, 30 Nov. 2009
By 
Mr. A. Hackett "Socialite" (Liverpool, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daredevil: Born Again Premiere HC (Hardcover)
I recently read this and I have to say that its a classic daredevil story. it focuses on Matt Murdock's worst nightmare: the kingpin knows his identity. What then occurs is the wrath of Wilson Fisk, destroying everything he has worked for and everything that he loves. It's really a good read and like the best type of DD stories it looks at the characters around him as well, like Foggy Nelson and Karen Paige. I would recommend this to anyone who just wants to have a decent read from the Daredevil of yesteryear.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 24 Dec. 2013
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A great read, brilliant art and a story that shows you everything that Daredevil is! Would recommend too any buyer who wants a good page turner.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Marvel greats, 11 April 2013
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This book has become one of my favourite comics of all time. Matt Murdoch's life falls apart when his identity is sold to the kingpin by the former love of his life, Karen Page, for a fix of heroin, an addiction that has taken her life, her integrity and her very soul from her. One by one, matt's loved ones leave his life for various reasons that have been caused by the kingpin, who has become obsessed with destroying the minor hinderance that is Daredevil. His business, his home and his acclimated wealth are all taken from him by the criminal godfather, who spins his web of blackmail, bribes and deceit to try and end matt's life, even making it impossible for matt to vent it all out by becoming the man without fear. as he fights his way through homelessness, loneliness, a crippled body and a diminishing faith in justice, the kingpin overlooks one major thing; that a man without hope is a man without fear.

i loved the internal dialogues from the 4 main characters centred on in this graphic novel, and the themes revealed through their struggles and relationships with fellow characters; Matt murdoch's redemption and reformation as he learns to love and forgive, karen page's struggle against soul-destroying odds to reach out for the only glimpse of hope she has left, the kingpin's growing obsession with the small but blown-out-of-proportion issue of an arch nemesis who simply refuses to die, and foggy nelson's struggle to find a ath that will allow him o be happy and also honour his mysterious friend matt.

Throughout this book, you see exactly who the man under the red-devil suit is, what he's made of, and why it is that he is such a tragic hero. it gave me a new understanding and, indeed, an newfound respect for the man that is the one without fear. truly an inspiring hero, if ever there was one.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Bored again, 2 Jun. 2012
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
SPOILERS

Matt Murdock's ex, Karen Page, sells out Murdock's secret identity as Daredevil to the Kingpin for an armful of junk and Murdock soon finds his life destroyed by the Kingpin's vast resources. Without a home, money, a job, and seemingly without friends, the Man Without Fear is crushed by the world spiritually and mentally and, in a desperate and hasty fight with the Kingpin, physically as well. This is the rebirth of the Daredevil... Born Again.

I'm a huge fan of Frank Miller's work, not his recent blip with "Holy Terror", but the classics like "Dark Knight Returns," "Year One", and the Sin City series. "Born Again" was the only remaining major work of his I'd not read so I thought it high time to read it despite not being the biggest Daredevil fan. And I have to say it was unimpressive. It had some good moments but it felt a bit weak, underwritten, and generally uninteresting for the most part.

Murdock is brought down too easily; it's hard to imagine someone being "destroyed" like Murdock is in this book so quickly as he is, even with someone as powerful as the Kingpin, without outside forces stepping in. It's also a bit too convenient to have Murdock believe the worst in his oldest friends without strong enough reason to. So his situation where his character becomes "Born Again" was a little too contrived for my liking.

The side story of "Foggy" (what a name), Matt's partner in the law firm they ran, and his current girlfriend, the Irish stereotype Glorianna O'Breen was dull, as was the reporter Ben Urich's whose own story arc was too predictable. Urich is forced not to write the truth about the Kingpin in the Daily Bugle, but finds the courage when the story demands it. Timing is everything ain't it?

Even Karen Page's storyline was boring. She's a heroin addict who starts the ball rolling on all of the events in the book but I just don't buy her as a real person. She's the template heroin addict, always going on about fixes and guilt, I didn't like her and felt that her story arc too was just too one dimensional.

There are some good moments when Murdock/Daredevil has to fight his way back to his true self by fighting a fake Daredevil and some nationalistic psycho called Nuke, and some intrigue with the nun who nursed him back to health - is she Murdock's ma? David Mazzucchelli's art is normally top notch but I kept noticing how thick the inking was throughout which put me off. There's too much black in those panels, it dates the book and makes the pages look blotchy.

Murdock is brought down too easily at the start and is brought back up at the end just as quickly so the ending feels rushed. Kingpin is defeated, you know this because he's got a frowny face and is crushing a newspaper with headlines to that effect; Murdock wins because he's walking down the street smiling with Karen on his arm - she got over her heroin addiction fast didn't see? And what about Foggy (ergh, that name again!) and Glori, and their practice? Is he back in Hell's Kitchen, starting a new law firm? Who knows, it's not explored here, the book just ends with Daredevil defeating "Nuke".

Overall the book didn't suck me in like Miller's stories usually do. Daredevil is a somewhat interesting character but his world sure isn't, and neither is this book. The story feels too much like a story with the kind of literary devices that ring false when used in the ham-fisted way Miller deploys them in this book. I wish I could agree with the many reviewers here who are obviously big fans of the book but I'm sorry to say that, to me, this is one of Miller's weaker efforts.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Please adapt this hollywood, 16 Sept. 2011
By 
Jack (Swindon, UK) - See all my reviews
The way it links back to Matt Murdock's backstory as well as putting his present self through absolute hell makes me think this is the story they should adapt (with a few changes) for the upcoming movie
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5.0 out of 5 stars 5*, 7 Aug. 2014
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Frank Miller at his best here, great story & great artwork.

Brilliant delivery, arrived within two days.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beware this is the Spanish version!, 15 May 2012
By 
p (Anderton, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Daredevil: Born again (Hardcover)
Please beware that this is the Spanish version. I ordered it unaware it was Spanish as it didn't say at the time I ordered.
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Daredevil: Born Again Premiere HC
Daredevil: Born Again Premiere HC by Frank Miller (Hardcover - 28 Jan. 2009)
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