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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story about good and evil.
This is a story about a young boy called Henry who works for a very intolerant man called Mr Hairston. He also befriends an old man who lives in the mental asylum called Mr Levine. Mr Levine is a holocaust survivor and has witnessed the destruction of his whole way of life and his family. He recreates his old village out of wood and it is picked to be on display in the...
Published on 4 Dec 2000

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unrealistic
Tunes for Bears to Dance To is a short children’s novel that centres upon a young boy who has to make a choice: one good and the other evil. I didn’t enjoy this book as I felt that although the theme is perfectly valid and appropriate, the flawed and completely unrealistic plot lets it down. Henry, the central character, works for Mr Hairston in his grocery...
Published on 22 July 2003


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A story about good and evil., 4 Dec 2000
By A Customer
This is a story about a young boy called Henry who works for a very intolerant man called Mr Hairston. He also befriends an old man who lives in the mental asylum called Mr Levine. Mr Levine is a holocaust survivor and has witnessed the destruction of his whole way of life and his family. He recreates his old village out of wood and it is picked to be on display in the city. Mr Hairston does not like Jews or the innocence of young Henry and seeks to find a way to harm both Mr Levine and the young boy. This is an excellent novel because it explores the evil side to humankind and the endurance of the human spirit under great stress.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Brilliant!, 22 May 1999
By A Customer
Tunes for bears to dance to has a very boring cover and even the first few pages don't capture your immagination but as the book progresses the story is ver inventive and the pain and suffering of the Jew in the second World War is really bought to life. Mr Haerston is a very evil man! Not for people that like a happy ending!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book that teaches an important lesson, 18 May 1999
By A Customer
I would just like to say that in 8th grade my teacher put this book in my hands while we were learning about Prejudice. Tunes was an excellent book to teach about hatered and prejudice. It is about a teenage boy that works with a man that is very prejudice and one day finds a friend that is a very important person.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Unrealistic, 22 July 2003
By A Customer
Tunes for Bears to Dance To is a short children’s novel that centres upon a young boy who has to make a choice: one good and the other evil. I didn’t enjoy this book as I felt that although the theme is perfectly valid and appropriate, the flawed and completely unrealistic plot lets it down. Henry, the central character, works for Mr Hairston in his grocery store, but when he is suddenly fired he finds out the true nature of his employer. The problem is, Mr Hairston has no motives whatsoever in what he asks the boy to do, or any other of the acts of cruelty he caries out. I cannot recommend this novel, but if you are a fan of Robert Cormier, then “The Chocolate War” books are very good.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A supernatural farce, 27 Nov 2003
The Lion Tamer’s Daughter, written by Peter Dickinson, tries to be a novel about the discovery of ones self and identity, but ends up as a ludicrous story with little interest and even less of a theme. The narrative is from a young boy named Keith who has been friends with a girl called Melly for most of his life. The trouble starts when Keith meets a girl who looks exactly like his old friend while touring with his mother (an actor). From here the story turns into an unbelievable and supernatural farce involving circus freaks, a private investigator and some sort of magical invoker.
I found this children’s novel incredibly uninteresting and have no choice but to highly oppose the buying of it.
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Tunes for Bears to Dance to
Tunes for Bears to Dance to by Robert Cormier (Hardcover - 1 Jan 2001)
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