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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
This is the third in the Lady Julia Grey Mysteries certainly better than the second and probably as good as the first, Deanna Raybourn has found her way with this character as well as other supporting characters.

Lady Julia Grey along with her sister Portia decide to go and stay with Nicholas Brisbane, the man that Lady Julia met whilst stood over her husband's dead body (see Silent in the Grave). His new property is in Yorkshire and there is something not quite right about it and the remaining residents the Allenby's who are intrinsically connected to the house and somehow to Brisbane. Lady Allenby is widowed and only has her two daughters Hilda and Ailith Allenby for company within the house, her son Redwall died after returning from Egypt after being exposed in Egyptology circles and ruining his reputation. However Redwall's fascination with Egyptology leads Lady Julia to start cataloguing his treasures from Egypt to keep her mind off the annoyance in her life that is Brisbane. This cataloguing leads to the opening up of the past, walls and coffins which results in some devastating actions.

Lady Julia also spends time with Rosalie, living on the crossroads on the moor, a gypsy who elects to stay in one place for a personal reason but helps many people with tonics and teas from everything natural. Rosalie has connections with Brisbane, and Lady Julia discovers a lot about his past, in turn Brisbane also has much confirmed about his background.

Raybourn has used her obvious love of all things gothic with this book - it has resonances of Jane Eyre, what is the history behind the women seemingly stuck in the house. Wuthering Heights, the wildness of the moor is described beautifully and poetically that it really gave a grave and dark foreboding sense to the property ironically called Grimsgrave. There is the witticism, and I love Lady Julia Grey's sister Portia who bounces off all the characters very well, despite her own life story. Their relationships with their maids' makes for amusing reading, and one wonders who is really in charge them or Morag and Minna. Romance is the air as we see it grow further into the open with Lady Julia and Brisbane. My only concern is that if they get together then will we lose that wonderful sparring and bantering they have which makes for their rich characters.

The story does seem somewhat slow, but whilst it is not a classic whodunit it has some depth, and makes you question the actions of those who are trapped at Grimsgrave. It is a wonderful insight to Victorian society not just from the upper echelons but also the lower ones, the maids stories are covered, even the wandering Gypsies(prominent in all these books) are covered with such care, that it becomes a book to show what life was like at that time, and how it affects others. In some cases the attempted murders become a back story.

I do hope there will be another book, hinted at definitely in the last couple of pages, but please do not lose the wonderful relationship that Lady Julia and Brisbane have developed.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 11 May 2009
When I read the first in this series, I didn't think it could be improved on--I just enjoyed all the characters immensely and was enthralled by the author's voice. Two books later and I'm happily amazed. While not quite a clear cut who-dunnit like the other books, in my opinion Silent on the Moor surpassed the others in the development of the relationships between characters. The Yorkshire setting is an excellently atmospheric background for Lady Julia Grey and Nicholas Brisbane's relationship. The mystery uncovered is pretty haunting and not a little creepy as well. It's a wonderful read. You won't be disappointed in this as a sequel. I just hope there's more to come!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 24 June 2009
I was already won-over by the first two books in the series and had breathlessly awaited the third installment - it could have been a recipe for disaster, as nothing can spoil a book quite so like one's giddy anticipation. On this occasion my expectations were surpassed on every level: the character development is truly superb, the quality of writing is absolutely pitch-perfect (especially the desolate descriptions of the moor) and manages to combine bone-chilling atmospheres and some genuinely laugh-out-loud moments of comedy, along with enough twists and turns to keep the most active brains busy.

This is NOT some sleazy snog-fest dressed up in frills & pink ribbons, it's an excellent mystery novel with echoes of Gothic Thrillers but thankfully doesn't fall into the trap of taking itself *too* seriously. If you're not a fan of Romance, give this a try - a genuinely witty and intelligent read that still makes the heart beat faster for more reasons than the mystery alone...
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The setting for this story is really creepy - Grimsgrave Hall in Yorkshire set against the desolation of the moors - is Nicholas Brisbane's new home. Julia and her sister, Portia, travel there to help Brisbane bring his new home up to snuff. What the hey? For services performed in the previous book, the Prime Minister was prepared to bestow a Viscountcy upon Nicholas. But when Nicholas realized the Grimsgrave property was available, requested the property instead? Okay, okay, I can't confess to having an inkling of what is going on in the deep mind of Brisbane, but even I think this was an awful choice.

Julia and Portia are NOT invited to attend Brisbane in his new home, but away they go anyway to the edge of civilization. Even they, with their wealth and resources, can barely find transportation the last few stages of the journey. Julia's father insists their brother, Valerius, tag along as their escort which of course he must do if he wants to continue receiving financial support from dear old Dad. Something havey cavey is going on between Portia and her live-in partner, Jane, which adds another element to the primary storyline. Portia is mostly sad even as she makes all the travel arrangements.

Finally they arrive at Grimsgrave. Of course Nicholas treats them like trash and immediately departs for a trip to Scotland. Does this surprise anyone? Honestly, I was about ready to cosh both Julia and Nicholas over the head at this point and the book is barely getting started. Meanwhile back at Grimsgrave, it seems that Nicholas is the owner, but there are three ladies still in attendance - former owners, the impoverished Lady Allenby and her daughters Ailith and Hilda. It seems that Sir Redwall Allenby, Lady Allenby's son, has passed away and left the three women adrift. They are now living in their former home on Nicholas' sufferance.

The game going on in this storyline runs deep - very deep. In fact, the reader won't understand the mysteries behind the mystery until the end of the book, but there are clues and it soon becomes obvious Nicholas has a long history with these people and this land. He's obviously very unhappy and one can't figure out if it is the desolation of the surroundings, regret about the home he's purchased, his back story with the Allenby family, his continual problem with those dratted headaches, or whatever else in the world is going on that we won't learn even within the pages of this book. Nicholas Brisbane is simply a deep character.

We have one bright spot in the book - local gypsy lady, Rosalie Smith, who truly befriends Julia - thankfully, because she will need friends in this godforsaken place. To make the case that the three Allenby ladies are beyond weird can't be effectively stated in this review. Suffice it to say, they are weird. Too much inbreeding has taken place in their bloodlines and the entire local population seems to have been affected. There is a fabulous hunky chunk of a cousin, Godwin, who watches over the sheep and apparently is the local swain. Can't figure out if he's a good guy or a bad guy.

When Julia takes it upon herself to catalogue some Egyptian paraphernalia Sir Redwall brought back from Egypt, believing the sale of such items will go toward helping the Allenby ladies to gain some financial independence, she unexpectedly comes across a mummy that raises questions nobody wants answered. These mummified remains are the basic mystery in the storyline, but of course there's a larger mystery pertaining to Nicholas Brisbane and his origins which is of great interest to the reader.

I'll give this book five stars, but the theme isn't my favorite. In fact, I don't do gothic stories - in my younger years - Yes! But no longer. They don't appeal to me. I like my fare more lighthearted. But this is Lady Julia and the intriguing Brisbane so I give it five stars. And, even though I wanted to crown Brisbane, their relationship does make a huge amount of progress in this story... eventually. Yes, good things come to those who wait.
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on 1 August 2011
Raybourn's books are very easy to read. She can write a bit but doesn't really succeed at doing more than providing anything more substantial than a bit of light entertainment. This is the third book in the series. I was hopeful that she could pull off some good evocations of what it is like to live on a moor. I live on the edge of a Lancastrian moor myself, so I know there is a wealth of natural beauty and wildlife available to use to colour the narrative. Unfortunately our Lady Julia's eye only manages to see the people that live on the moor, the only wildlife are the pets and the 6 sheep that are alluded to though never seen. Other than it being wet, grassy, with the odd crag or bog, the moor has to make do with turning silvery in moonlight for its descriptive wiles. The characters are amusing, though there seems to be less and less wit as this series progresses and Brisbane has entirely become a caricature, a Heathcliff shaped silhouette for Lady Julia to play with. As detectives both characters are terribly inept, their modus operandi seems to mainly involve them pottering about waiting for the answers to come to them. In the gaps between pottering they mainly argue and pretend they aren't madly in love with one another. The only real mystery in this book is how on earth Deanna Raybourn manages to get through the entire writing process without using the word 'décolletage' once. My guess is there is a previous draft copy somewhere with the word scribbled out 137 times with an editorial footnote reminding the author of the chilliness of Yorkshire moors. The weirdest thing of all though is that I keep reading them.
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`Silent on the Moor' is the third book in the Lady Julia Grey mystery series. It follows on directly from the action in the previous books so if you haven't read them I'd recommend starting with `Silent in the Grave' so you can appreciate the character development and background to this instalment.

Julia and her sister Portia follow the enigmatic Nicholas Brisbane to his new Estate in Yorkshire; Portia, so she can assist by adding a woman's touch to the housekeeping and Julia so she can get to grips with whether their romance is worth pursuing. Instead they find that the Estate is still inhabited by members of the last family to have lived there, a gypsy fortune teller and healer and an Estate Manager who appears to have something to hide. As with the previous books, a mystery presents itself and it is up to Julia to solve it (although this time with much less interaction between her and Brisbane.)

I have to admit to being quite disappointed with this novel compared to the earlier two in the series, which rattled along at an incredible pace and had great chemistry between Julia and Brisbane. The storyline and setting borrow a great deal from the novels of the Bronte sisters and whilst it is quite atmospheric it lacks the intrigue and drama of the earlier books. I will persevere with the series but am hoping that now she has addressed Brisbane's background and past that we can move on and deal with his future.
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on 19 October 2009
I was desperately looking forward to the 3rd in the Lady Julia Grey series, so as soon as I had the opportunity money and time to read the book I snapped it up. I really enjoyed the first two in the series (recommended reading as the character development continues across all 3 books) and so perhaps had too high expectations. Like some of the readers I found the first half slow. Whilst I enjoy the blossoming romantic relationship between Lady Julia and Brisbane, I read this book rather than pure romantic fiction because I enjoy the crime element and to wait nearly half a book for an attempted murder seemed rather a long time. That is why I have given it the 4 stars rather than the full 5. That said, about mid way through, the book picks up pace and the plot starts to incorporate other characters who add interest to the story. The author does seem to be spot on in her recreation of upper class life in Victorian England and I enjoy the detail she pays to things such as clothing, hair etc. I would recommend both this book and the wider series, and I look forward to her next book in the series (I hope there is one!)
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on 25 September 2010
I can't believe it's the same person who wrote the first book. If you haven't read Silent in the Grave please do. It's excellent. And I'm not really into historical books, I much prefer Patricia Briggs or J.D. Robb.

In this book, gone were the witty, engaging lines, the wonderful personality of Lady Jane and the mysterious Brisbane. Instead you get a run of the mill murder mystery. I actually believe that either this and the previous book was written by someone else other than Deanna Raybourn, or her editor encouraged her to 'dumb' it down, hence why such a bland disappointing book.

I'm glad I got this from the library.
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Silent on the Moor is the third book in the Lady Grey Series and very enjoyable. Set in Yorkshire, England 1889, the book follows the story of Julia (Lady Grey) as she follows her heart and tries to make private investigator Nicholas Brisbane see sense and admit his love for her. (They are both stubborn mules)
With murder, mystery investigations, plot twists and family troubles, secrets are revealed and decisions are made to bring the excellent story to a satisfying end.
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on 10 October 2009
I was quite frustrated that a crime/murder seemed to take so long to appear in this book, it spends more time on the relationship between our unlikely Victorian sleuths than anything else. All does become clear later and it does tie up some loose ends but it was the least satisfying as a mystery. And some of the ends tied up rather too cutely. If you enjoyed the previous two then you must read this but don't make this the first/only one you read.
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