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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Science Set Free formerly The Science Delusion
SCIENCE SET FREE is an excellent work, well worth the reading. Here are ten reasons why.
1. Good writing. The sine-qua-non of all good books... and the test is that once started it is hard to put down.
2. Personal. One can feel the engagement of the writer in the prose. He is there in light touches of humour: but more importantly, he is there in his...
Published on 8 Oct. 2012 by Pete Sargasso

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Plain Language Science
Sheldrake is a great open-minded thinker and this book goes some way to opening other people's minds. It turns well-found scientific statements into questions which, by the way, I think they should be anyway! However, you need to really concentrate. Which is unusual for a Sheldrake book. He's usually quite reader-savvy and scientific language-free, though this book...
Published 20 months ago by BewleyBooks


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Science Set Free formerly The Science Delusion, 8 Oct. 2012
SCIENCE SET FREE is an excellent work, well worth the reading. Here are ten reasons why.
1. Good writing. The sine-qua-non of all good books... and the test is that once started it is hard to put down.
2. Personal. One can feel the engagement of the writer in the prose. He is there in light touches of humour: but more importantly, he is there in his conviction, in his willingness to share data and in his reporting of the way his work has been marginalized - not because it is wrong- but because it challenges some of the current assumptions of Science.
3. Coherent Structure. All the chapters follow the same pattern, and this gives the book a special kind of unity. Each chapter begins with a question followed by a historical analysis of how that question has been answered in different epochs, and leading to an up-to-date analysis of the available data.
4. Superb bibliography. Enough reading here for a lifetime.
5. Breaks new ground. No one can tell where research will lead, but an openness to fresh ideas is necessary for progress.
6. Educational. Whether one agrees with Sheldrake or not, SCIENCE SET FREE serves as an introduction to many areas of scientific research. Where the jargon of science is necessary to avoid confusion, he explains not only the meaning of a given term, but its etymology. That is a courtesy to the reader and greatly facilitates understanding.
7. Interdisciplinary. The text moves easily from scientific research to conclusions from ancient and modern philosophy. Also, it is not restricted to one science but ranges from physics to botany, to the experiences of shamans, to telepathy, and yes, to religion somewhat.... Hence we gain a comprehensive picture. The quest is for knowledge and understanding with an open mind, but with a humanitarian conscience to guide it.
8 Challenges the imagination.
9 Tackles subjects rarely tackled. Telepathy, precognition, etc.
10 Explores and explains Morphic resonance, an exciting hypothesis which may, in time, be conclusively proven.
Basically, Morphic Resonance argues that similar patterns of activity resonate across time and space with subsequent patterns. This hypothesis applies to all self-organizing systems, including atoms, molecules, crystals, cells, plants, animals, and animal societies. All draw on a collective memory and in turn contribute to it. Thus, when an orb web spider starts spinning its web, it follows the habits of countless ancestors, resonating with them directly across space and time. The more people who learn a new skill, the easier will it be for others to learn it because of morphic resonance.
What excited my attention regarding this is that it explained the way that rehearsals for a play can suddenly come alive. I have noticed this often. At a certain point, repetition becomes resonance, and the whole play/rehearsal moves forwards with greater coherence. Actors suddenly find they know their lines and the whole emotional tone lifts. When the experience is too fragmented this does not happen.
And of course, if Sheldrake's theory is correct, then the more people who begin to think and seek for morphic resonance, the more it should manifest.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An astonishing book by an astonishing mind, 15 April 2013
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At last we have someone willing to stand up and say that intelligent people can be as dogmatic as anyone else. If not more so because they know they are intelligent, and therefore right. Here we have, at last, someone who takes everything science assumes without evidence, which is a shocking amount, and questions it.

This really is a book that everyone can read, and the dogmatic idiots who censored his TED talk can suck on it, because this book is what science should REALLY be about - open free enquiry.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, 20 Sept. 2013
This review is from: Science Set Free: 10 Paths to New Discovery (Paperback)
As a Science student, I have found anyone who dares to disagree with the views and assumptions of materialists/atheists is likely to get plenty of abuse, I can totally relate to this book.

Considering Science is supposed to be a method of enquiry, it is refreshing to read this book rather than much of the dogma out there.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First class in every respect., 30 April 2013
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A very, very important book. In order for science to get beyond its current malaise of entrenched dogmas, science needs to 'set itself free' from the key dogmas listed and explained in this book. Little wonder that Sheldrake has had his talks banned from some channels; he represents a potent and articulate threat to the vested interests of pseudo and ideological science. Great stuff.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars obvious, 29 July 2013
Sheldrake is basically stating the obvious. That is, for all our progress, we are still flesh and cells, limited in space and time. A mere fleshy body, a gasp of pain between birth and death. A fragile craft steering the torments of the planet. And Rupert Sheldrake should know, he has a PhD in biology and so until they invent an immortality app, then this picture is valid.

Because they haven't invented an immortality app, there is only one question, "whence come I and whither go I? That is the great unfathomable question, the same for every one of us. Science has no answer to it". Max Planck wrote these words over 100 years ago.

Materialism postulates the fingertips are the peak of metaphysical conjecture. This is naive. Materialism is a biological lie because of the absence of the after-death. Because of the absence of an afterlife in our technological civilisation, with neither a heaven above or a hell below, when we die, nothing remains, we are devoured by the Lord of Darkness.

Terence McKenna once said that, "for approximately 500 years [science's] argument for it's pre-eminence was that it could create beautiful toys: aircraft, railroads, global economics, television, spacecraft. But that is a fool's argument for truth! I mean that's after all how a medicine show operates, you know: the juggler is so good, the medicine must be even better"!

The father of quantum mechanics, Max Planck, argued that the aim of scientific knowledge is merely the moving of matter and energy from here and there, that is, science will never be the meaning, because we die. Sorry! Planck wrote that science "is an incessant struggle towards a goal which can never be reached. Because the goal is of its very nature unattainable. It is something that is essentially metaphysical and as such is always again and again beyond each achievement." I don't care what new app is out there, what Planck said still holds true today. Arthur Schopenhauer thought the same. He argues that "science can never allow anyone to gain access to the inner essence of things; all we do is chase appearances to infinity, moving without end or goal like a squirrel on a wheel, until tired at last, whether on top or bottom, we stop at some arbitrary point and want people to respect us for it". Indeed we respect the individual scientist, even though they run the squirrel wheel, to win the Nobel Prize.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Plain Language Science, 29 Sept. 2013
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Sheldrake is a great open-minded thinker and this book goes some way to opening other people's minds. It turns well-found scientific statements into questions which, by the way, I think they should be anyway! However, you need to really concentrate. Which is unusual for a Sheldrake book. He's usually quite reader-savvy and scientific language-free, though this book goes some way towards that, it can be a bit dry and you have to work at trying to decipher what the meaning of each chapter is.
All in all, an informative book, but not as 'exciting' or reader-friendly as I believed it would be.
Kaye
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6 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not even wrong, 30 Dec. 2012
By 
A. Gibson - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Sheldrake commands some respect as a scientist because of his education and degree, however, his continued pose as a scientist on the frontier of discovery is unwarranted. He prefers metaphysics to science, though he seems to think he can do the former but call it the latter. He seeks to deceive the reader into thinking that real skepticism involves being critical of mainstream science while promoting pseudo-scienctifc studies that have no reliable evidence.

The book sets up 10 fundamental beliefs of science and then seeks to disprove them. In fact science has no core beliefs structure since everything is falsifiable but this isn't mentioned. The argument tries to isolate all current understanding to mechanisms. This leaves room for the apparently more natural, human and god wanting notion of creative free-willed life which Sheldrake encapsulates in his idea of "morphic resonance" (Skeptic dictionary is a good place to look this up). This idea is that memory is inherent in nature, if a shape or structure has occurred it makes it easier to happen again. This would suggest the a crossword is easier to do at the end of the day since many other people have done it. If this idea isn't total nonsense then it's doing a very good impression of it. This entire book is an attempt to justify this idea and little more. Sheldrake provides much anecdotal evidence for his ideas and has cherry picked evidence to support him while failing entertain the idea that he could be wrong. He seeks to change science to fit his ideas, rather than changes his ideas to fit reality, he is convinced that morphic resonance is real and this book is the argument for it.

Sheldrake's argument is "science has not accepted my ideas, therefore science is wrong." This is analogous to contestants of talent programs, after clearly demonstrating they have no talent, the contestant argues with judges. Since it must be the judges and the system that is wrong, never them. He makes many false assumptions and claims about science as a belief system, and he doesn't address the central idea that science is evidence based knowledge that seeks to proves itself wrong. This fundamental idea separates scientific knowledge from nonsense, but his argument steers him well away from science. Hence his ideas are worse than wrong, they are not even wrong, he has just made up something that does not fit with reality and is therefore useless and his delusions should not be inflicted on the public. He should not blame science for this, only himself. If only he could be as critical of himself as he attempts to be critical of science he would realise his ideas and his whole argument is nonsense.
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Science Set Free: 10 Paths to New Discovery
Science Set Free: 10 Paths to New Discovery by Rupert Sheldrake (Paperback - 3 Sept. 2013)
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