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99 of 102 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars what this book has to offer you is a gift for life
THIS IS WHAT I HAVE WRITTEN IN MY BOOK REPORT FOR SCHOOL (15 years old from Israel)
I may not read much, still, every book I have Read is simply not as good as "Tuesdays with Morrie". Its words explain the Authors feelings in such way you'd think you are the one who wrote this book, you are the one this whole book is about, and this is a description of your own...
Published on 18 May 2001

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good lessons, but great ones?
Does this short novella live up to the hype it generated? Well, yes and no. The lessons were good, but not always great. As with any general philosophy, it hits and misses depending on your individual circumstance. The pursuit of a money in a career does not gain you fulfillment? Sure, I'll buy into that one, but for the millions of workless people around the world it's a...
Published on 25 May 2010 by Daniel Park


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99 of 102 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars what this book has to offer you is a gift for life, 18 May 2001
By A Customer
THIS IS WHAT I HAVE WRITTEN IN MY BOOK REPORT FOR SCHOOL (15 years old from Israel)
I may not read much, still, every book I have Read is simply not as good as "Tuesdays with Morrie". Its words explain the Authors feelings in such way you'd think you are the one who wrote this book, you are the one this whole book is about, and this is a description of your own feelings. If I could purchase this book for the whole World, I would, in a minute. Obviously, I recommend this book to any Person who can cope with tears, sadness and Coping with emotions and be aware of them. Saying "Tuesdays with Morrie" is beautiful is An understatement. When you read this book, your laugh, you cry and most important you learn so many new things not only about who this book describes and learning to appreciate them - but you learn about your self and you learn to appreciate your self. All in all, this book is beautiful, easy to read and Easy to understand. Anyone will enjoy if only you Open your heart and you are willing to receive a gift you Will not get - anywhere else.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not to be missed., 4 Jan 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Tuesdays with Morrie (Audio CD)
One of the most inspiring books I have ever read. This book is an experience, a journey, a gem. I would share this gift of enlightenment with everyone I care about. This is a book to be shared with special people. The experience of this story opens doors of acceptance, love, humility and the possibilities of changing what seems to be the most unchangable in ourselves, our lives, our relationships. Reading this book and absorbing its messages is a living and growing experience. You will read it. You will feel it. You will grow and change. You will laugh and cry. You will let go and you will hold on. And then you will read it again.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It completely refreshes your outlook on life., 30 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This is a completely heart-rendering, touching and genuine piece of work which has you laughing, crying and thinking about life, death and the world today. It is written about an old professor (Morrie) who knows he is dying and is telling people about what this unusual situation feels like. The author is an old student of his who has 'fallen by the way', choosing the very hectic modern life many people now take as normal. It is of course a true story which makes it all the more poignant and hard-hitting. I thoroughly recommend that you read this. Once you pick it up you cannot put it down.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book - a must read for everyone, 14 Feb 2003
This review is from: Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man, and Life's Greatest Lesson (Paperback)
It is a quite simple story, but yet a life's philosophy. Morrie's story has touched me deeply and made me see life from a different perspective. Embrace life fully and live every moment as it is given to you or as Morrie has put it: "Devote yourself to loving others, devote yourself to your community around you, and devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose and meaning."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good lessons, but great ones?, 25 May 2010
By 
Daniel Park "danielpark99" (West Yorkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Does this short novella live up to the hype it generated? Well, yes and no. The lessons were good, but not always great. As with any general philosophy, it hits and misses depending on your individual circumstance. The pursuit of a money in a career does not gain you fulfillment? Sure, I'll buy into that one, but for the millions of workless people around the world it's a bitter irrelevance. The importance of getting married? Sure, that may make sense but not at the expense of abusive relationships and what about the increasing number of single people in the world? Are they condemned as a result?
Perhaps the most telling lesson was the idea of the little bird on your shoulder asking you if today is your day to die. It sounds morose, but it does help you make choices that veer you away from exploiting your fellow human beings - and that is a lesson well worth all of us learning.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A timely reminder, 14 Jan 2004
Life is short so it is up to us to make it sweet. Of course the book is not going to start any revolutions anywhere, but for people caught up in the madness of daily modern existence, this is a timely reminder of what characterizes real success and accomplishment in our over materialistic and superficial lives.
Every Brandeis graduate should read this book :-)
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly good, 27 Feb 2006
By 
H. Monzel (Frankfurt, Germany) - See all my reviews
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Tuesdays at Morrie's is an incredible book about how everything in life matters: An old professor - Morrie - knows that he will be dying, but instead of pitying himself, he is sharing everything that is important to him until the last minute. He talks with a former student of his about different themes of life and how he approaches them. Sharing his knowledge makes a huge difference in a lot of people's lifes.
It reminded me of "Working on yourself doesn't work" from Ariel and Shya Kane. A great book about going for your life with totality and excellence, but without fixing yourself. I know it sounds like a paradox, but this books gives you the tools how to have a magnificent life: day in and day out. I highly recommend it!
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Young Man's Fumbling Death Bed Learning, 3 Aug 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
Professor Morrie Schwartz is the mentor we would all like to have. Often we fail to seek out such a mentor because we feel inadequate or not worthy enough. If so, you will identify with Mitch Albom who seeks out his teacher's wisdom for the final time in this book. His fumbling should reassure even the most inhibited person to reach out for this kind of connection. That's the hidden beauty of this book, as Professor Schwartz's goodness shines through the narrowness of Mr. Albom's life.
This wonderful book focuses on the meaning of life, from the perspective of a teacher (Morrie Schwartz) who is about to lose his life and his pupil, (Mitch Albom) who has lost his focus on what is important. They come together for 14 Tuesdays (just like they did while the author was a college student at Brandeis) before the professor passes away of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease).
This book is filed with the most beautiful sayings you can imagine. Here are a few examples: 'Giving to other people is what makes us feel alive.' 'Love each other or perish.' 'Everybody knows they are going to die, but nobody believes it. If we did, we would do things differently.' 'Learn to detach from experience.'
Many people would avoid a book on this subject, because they do not want to think about death. Although Morrie Schwartz is dying throughout this book, the subject is really about living rather than dying. Few will find the dying to be distressing, even though it is graphically and frequently addressed.
For those of us with many years to live, this book can be a wake-up call to start really living now -- in the ways we would if we were about to die, as well as to learn how to treat others while we still have them with us. For those who have but little time left, this book can be an inspiration for how to get the most out of the remaining time.
You will probably find it heart-warming (as I did) to find out that the advance on this book was paid in time to help defray some of Professor Schwartz's medical expenses.
May you find new meaning in your life from reading this wonderful book! Life is a teacher, and Morrie Schwartz's thoughts can be a text to help you understand the lessons. Live well and make your choices consciously!
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyone should learn something from reading this book, 8 Aug 2001
It will only take you a couple of days to read, but the lessons to be learned should stay with you forever. Each chapter looks at an aspect of life - death, growing old, love from Morrie's point of view. A true story, a remarkable man. It should make you laugh, and definitely cry. I've already bought 3 copies to give to friends.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, uplifting book. Not to be missed!, 21 Jun 2007
By 
The book chronicles one man's views on life from the perspective of the dying. Gloomy? Depressing? Not one bit! Just the opposite in fact. Morrie relishes the fact that he's been given a chance to tie up the loose ends, to say all of the things that he wanted to say to the people he cares about before being snatched away. For Mitch Albom, watching Morrie go through this is a chance for him to reflect on what's important in his own life. And isn't it interesting that the things that become important to us when we're stripped of our ability to enjoy all the frivolous trappings of our society are those very simple things that actually make us human ... love, family, friendship and so on. (Don't get me wrong, I'm all for a bit of frivolous unnecessary stuff - but without the cake as a base, icing would just be ... well ... soggy sugar! )

Don't be put off by the low scoring reviewers - a few of these have missed the point of the book completely! Morrie WAS a teacher - that's what he did in life, it's what he wanted to do right up until the end of his life and it's what he hoped would be his legacy after his death. He certainly doesn't claim to be an oracle or to have all of the answers ... he just wants to tell us what he's learnt in all of his years as a teacher, a father, a husband, a son and a friend.
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