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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I wish I was a Jumper
I like to have a rule with regards to books that have been made into films: read the book first. This is largely down to the fact that almost always the book is significantly superior to the film, which is certainly the case with Jumper. In fact there are so many differences between the novel and the film that they bare only the slightest resemblance to each other. I hope...
Published on 2 Mar 2008 by D. M. York

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spelling mistakes...
The story was gripping, but the frequent spelling mistakes stopped the flow of the story too many times. Why should we suffer poor quality when reading an electronic version!!!
Published 18 months ago by ChalkyN


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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars I wish I was a Jumper, 2 Mar 2008
By 
D. M. York (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jumper (Paperback)
I like to have a rule with regards to books that have been made into films: read the book first. This is largely down to the fact that almost always the book is significantly superior to the film, which is certainly the case with Jumper. In fact there are so many differences between the novel and the film that they bare only the slightest resemblance to each other. I hope that this has convinced you to try and read the book.

The novel is based around the life of Davy Rice, a teenager who discovers that he has the ability to teleport or `jump' instantaneously from place to place. This serves as the catalyst to run away from his abusive drunken father and to begin a life of his own, a life that he soon realises is not bound by the limitations that other people might experience.

The novel, though obviously supernatural in its foundations, is very much about growing up. At the beginning of the novel Davy is a shy and nervous adolescent who lives in constant fear of his overbearing father, the novel shows his journey into becoming a mature and responsible adult. What I liked about the story is that it shows very honestly what most people would do with the ability to come and go as they please, anywhere in the world, the novel shows very easily the freedom that he so effortlessly possesses.

This book contains a heart that the film sadly did not possess; the film seemed to paint Davy as a very self-obsessed loner, whereas the book shows his real motivations and that he is in fact an intelligent and emotional young man. As one reviewer has commented this book is listed somewhere as "young adult fiction", which I think can only be down to the fact that the subject matter does involve a good deal of wish fulfillment. A superb piece of writing to be sure, my one and only reason for not giving the book the coveted five star rating is the fact that I thought the ending was a tiny bit abrupt. Otherwise a wonderful piece of science-fiction.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book, but a word of warning..., 8 Mar 2008
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This review is from: Jumper (Paperback)
This is an excellent book. I bought it because I saw the trailer for the movie and thought: "what a good idea, but I bet they've overdone the special effects at the expense of the story". So I thought I'd read the book first. I didn't realise that this book is not the story of the movie, but I enjoyed this so much that I probably will read 'Jumper: Griffin's Story' as well. I still haven't seen the movie and don't think I'll bother. The beauty of this story is not the imagery of moving instantly from place to place, but the moral dilemas the main character, Davy Rice, faces as a result of his ability. Is it acceptable to rob a bank so long as no one gets hurt? To convince someone they're going insane because they treated you badly in the past? To dispense justice to terrorists just because you can? There are many, many interesting questions and issues raised in this book.

But my word of warning is this: the movie is 12A and this book was (at one point, if not now) listed in a 'Young Adult' category. I would say this book really isn't appropriate for younger readers. There are some very dark themes: physical and mental child abuse, alcoholism, domestic violence, terrorist violence and homelessness to name a few. Admittedly there's no graphic sex or much in the way of swearing, but I would still strongly suggest that any parent thinking of buying this book for their child after seeing the film read it first, because it may not be suitable.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deserves ten stars!, 31 Aug 2003
By 
Mark E. Cooper "Fantasybooks" (STANFORD-LE-HOPE, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Jumper (Mass Market Paperback)
I loved this one. The idea of a person being able to teleport from place to place is not new, but it still has the power to fascinate. Just think, what would you do if you could jump from one side of the world to another just by concentrating upon a photograph of your destination?

David Rice can do just that as he learns quite by accident during a moment of heightened stress when his abusive father attacks him. We follow David as he learns what he can do, but not why he can do it. This frustrates him until he becomes distracted by other events. He robs a bank, gets a girlfriend older than him, finds his estranged mother, loses the girl, loses the mother, gets the girl again, tracks down a bunch of terrorists.... phew! David sure is busy in this book and I love it! Oh yeah, he makes a fool out of the FBI and police at nearly every turn... great!

Jumper is simply great fun. Once you pick it up, you'll not want to put it down until the last page is read. When you've finished it, you'll want to put it somewhere safe. I guarantee you'll want to read it again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A MOST EXCELLENT ADVENTURE..., 29 Sep 2001
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Jumper (Mass Market Paperback)
David Rice is a highly intelligent, well read, seventeen year old boy, who has been physically and verbally abused by his father for years. Abandoned by his mother, Mary, when he was twelve, because David's father, her husband, also battered her, David decides that he cannot take any more abuse. In a moment of great personal angst, he discovers that he can teleport himself to a safe place. So, begins a new life for David and a most excellent adventure for the reader.
David, to his own amazement, can teleport, but there there is a method to the madness, which he soon discovers. His new ability, however, enables him to not have to return home. He, instead, starts a new life for himself, one which the reader will enjoy sharing, as his new found ability, which he calls "jumping", leads to many interesting situations. Some of the situations in which he gets involved turn him into an unusual sort of super hero. Inventive and absorbing, this is a very special coming of age story that will keep the reader turning the pages.
The only problem with the book is that many of David's initial problems, while on his own, arise out of his lack of a social security number. This is a highly unlikely case scenario, because David would have needed a social security number for some of the standardized tests a student is required to take, as the social security number would act as the student's identification number. Moreover, his father would have needed David's social security number in order to claim him as a deduction on his income tax return. This is, however, the only false note in this otherwise totally delightful tale of a young man with powers of teleportation and the ways in which he puts his ability to use.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Personal journey. Not like the film, 16 Feb 2008
By 
Mr. I. M. Davis (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jumper (Paperback)
Quick warning: despite the 2008 cover update, this book provides only the source ideas for the film - if you want the story of the film, see his specially written "Jumper - Griffin's Story".

The narrative here is very different - the personal and very lonely journey of the only known Jumper, escaping his abusive father and trying to survive in a cold and brutal world. Pitched, I'd say, mostly at a teen audience (sexual references, alcohol abuse and violence not for younger children, but from a moral standpoint recommended to teens), but abruptly shifts up a gear mid-point. Gould's book tries hard to follow the rules not just of his jumping idea but of how an isolated teenager might approach life with it, and of how the consequences might affect him and those he tells.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Believe the hype!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!, 18 Dec 2007
By 
John L. Mccuaig (Croydon, London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Jumper (Mass Market Paperback)
Wow, i must admit i was slightly worried when i bought this book that it may not live up to the reviews which i had read, how wrong i was!
This should be classed as a true classic, i have never had so much empathy for a character, i found myself laughing, cheering and crying all in one night. If you only ever buy one book make it this one, no superlatives are good enough, i just wish i could a) do it justice in my review and b) give it six stars.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars what a surprise, 6 May 2008
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This review is from: Jumper (Paperback)
I grabbed this after my partner had finished it because I didn't have anything else to read. I wouldn't have chosen it for myself in a million years but I may have to read more of his books after this. I really enjoyed it, it gripped me from start to finish and I read it in no time at all. The main character Davey is lovely and I really warmed to him. It's such a novel idea and although Sci Fi I found the 'jumping' surprisingly believable, which is a shock to me!! It was fun and easy to read and not just for the big boys(who still think they're teenagers), I think some big girls will like it too.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pure Wish Fulfillment!!, 12 Aug 2008
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This review is from: Jumper (Paperback)
Though the cover has been updated with the stylish image of Hayden Christensen, this is the original Jumper novel published in 1992. Author Steven Gould must be fairly happy with himself of late; the worldwide success of the Jumper movie (released February '08) propelled the sale of his knockabout sci-fi novel ten-fold. When the screenplay for the movie was being developed introducing several new characters that did not feature in the book, he tapped out a prequel novel entitled Jumper: Griffin's story (also a good read) focussing on Jamie Bell's character and that of Roland, the Paladin character played by Samuel L. Jackson.

This is a good opportunity to mention just how the Jumper novel and the movie differ. And differ they do, quite considerably. The novel is intended not for the early teenage reader, but for young adults as well as mature readers. Whilst the movie showed David Rice discovering his gift as he falls beneath a frozen lake, in the novel David finds himself jumping away as he braces himself for another beating from his violent alcoholic father. He still arrives at his school's library trashing numerous shelves of books, though in the novel Stanville Public Library becomes a sanctuary for David each time he needs to seek shelter. The scenes in the opening credits of the movie as Davy robs a bank are present and correct, so too are the scenes showing him stashing everything under his bed in a cheap hotel. His girlfriend Millie appears in the book though they meet in a different place. The movie has the two characters as old school friends. The novel sees David meeting Millie at a party, before beginning their very tentative relationship. This is one area that I believe both the movie and the novel gets right. It is a resounding success for the writer and screenwriters. The relationship between them is very sweet and very emotional. If you have read the novel after seeing the film then you will be able to imagine the two of them together.

After the initial set up the movie and novel's events diverge significantly: the novel sees Davy trying to make his way on the streets of New York, acquiring false documentation, finding accommodation and trying to avoid too many unpleasant people as he comes to terms with his gift. The movie immediately introduces the Paladin characters and their violent quest to exterminate all jumpers. Davy's main adversaries in the novel are agents of the NSA. The Paladins do not feature in the novel at all, and presumably at the time the novels were written the author hadn't thought of them. The sub-plot that features David's mother as a member of the Paladin order who left home when Davy was 13 in order to protect him, is therefore entirely absent. The novel tells of his mother Mary Rice having merely left to escape the abusive husband. The Griffin character also does not appear and is very likely a creation of the movie's screenplay. One segment of the book which would have made interesting viewing given the current international political climate is the part of the story focussing on terrorism; David finding himself in a unique position to resolve a number of aircraft hijackings. However it is understandable why the film-makers chose to abandon this idea given the fact that one of the book's main villains is an Arab terrorist.

I look forward to reading the most recent novel in the series 'Reflex', and one hopes that the rumoured sequels to the Jumper movie will soon be put into production. There is also available on Amazon a Jumper Graphic Novel entitled 'Jumpscars' which is a prequel to the movie, and is also worth a look. So...Jumper the novel is well worth a read, especially for the aforementioned emotive relationship between Davy and Millie. And I think we all would just love the ability to `Jump' ourselves wouldn't we? This concept is pure wish fulfilment!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Spelling mistakes..., 27 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Jumper (Kindle Edition)
The story was gripping, but the frequent spelling mistakes stopped the flow of the story too many times. Why should we suffer poor quality when reading an electronic version!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable but riddled with typos, 12 Dec 2010
This review is from: Jumper (Kindle Edition)
I could not put this down. Very enjoyable.
However, the kindle version at least is riddled with typos - I counted 34 in total.

This file has now been updated by Amazon.
The typos are reduced but not eradicated....
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Jumper by Steven Gould (Paperback - 19 Aug 2014)
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