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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dune Fanatic
I have eagerly awaited The Battle of Corrin, which concludes an excellent trilogy which started with The Butlerian Jihad and continued with The Machine Crusade. I was particularly interested in the origins of the Suk Medical School, the Guild Navigators and the Mentats, and discovering what the original Iblis Ginjo was like. There is also a nice little twist, which I...
Published on 2 Sep 2004

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A drawn out and not always believable Dune backstory
Frank Herbert hinted at the Butlerian Jihad in his original Dune novel as the 100+ year war that saw humanity defeat thinking machines. The Legends of Dune trilogy is an attempt to fill-out this backstory. I waited until I had read all 3 books before writing a review. There are so many superfluous threads in these novels that would have made the whole thing much more...
Published on 25 Mar 2007 by Gareth Connor


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dune Fanatic, 2 Sep 2004
By A Customer
I have eagerly awaited The Battle of Corrin, which concludes an excellent trilogy which started with The Butlerian Jihad and continued with The Machine Crusade. I was particularly interested in the origins of the Suk Medical School, the Guild Navigators and the Mentats, and discovering what the original Iblis Ginjo was like. There is also a nice little twist, which I found intriguing. I have now finished and will go straight on to House Atreides.
It is definately essential reading for any Dune fan out there.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its Duneish (!?), 12 Jan 2005
By 
Teresa Sinclair (uk) - See all my reviews
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Could not stop reading it.
Faithful to the universe, doesn`t pull its punches, and gives more depth to the seminal work.
But then i`m biased, as the whole series (father and son versions) are by far my favourite books. I`ve got the pyjamas, books, posters, films, toys, props... and i`m pretty sure my wife would feed me to the worms if she could!!
But read them in order to get the full effect.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but a bit simplistic, 21 Aug 2005
Although this book is enjoyable, and nice and easy to read, it really is just that, no depth to it or anything like that, but never the less, good fun to read, and worth the price tag.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A drawn out and not always believable Dune backstory, 25 Mar 2007
By 
Gareth Connor "gazinhio" (Cheshire, England) - See all my reviews
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Frank Herbert hinted at the Butlerian Jihad in his original Dune novel as the 100+ year war that saw humanity defeat thinking machines. The Legends of Dune trilogy is an attempt to fill-out this backstory. I waited until I had read all 3 books before writing a review. There are so many superfluous threads in these novels that would have made the whole thing much more believable had they have been omitted. Primary the Cymeks, the living brains of rathers nasty ex-humans. They are entirely pointless in the whole scheme of things and take up several hundred pages over the three novels. At the very least their role could have been played down. It took nearly 2000 pages in 3 books that could have been told in half of that - worse and ironically the ending was rushed and left so many threads hanging including the Bene Gesserit, the Spacing Guild, the formation of the Empire and more. The importance of Spice and Arrakis and the Fremen is however developed quite well - but most of the story felt self-indulgent with the authors seemingly enjoying the writing experience over hundreds of totally unneccessary pages and plot threads. Of particular annoyance to me was how the Jihad went on for over a hundred years without victory and yet when the authors decided enough was enough and it's time to end it - the end victory was rushed and felt so easy. The actual battle of Corrin only takes up the last 40 or so pages - and the final reason for the feud between the Atreides and Harkonnens is so inplausable it's untrue. For the most part I enjoyed the story but I doubt it was the kind of dark, fight for humanity's survival that Frank Herbert originally was thinking of when he developed the backstory. I can't help but feel they drew it out so long it took a lot of the edge of it and it was, for the most part, an unlikely history of the wonderful Dune universe (the Prelude to Dune trilogy by the same authors is much better.)
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars answered most of my questions, 9 Sep 2004
By 
M. Welch "69yorkroad" (London) - See all my reviews
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So now we know the origins of the Spacing Guild, The Great Houses, Prescience, The Bene Gesserit, Mentats and what i personally think is the most important concept, the feud between Atriedes and Harkonnen. Admitedly the later is a bit weak, i was expecting something a little more devious, especially with the Harkonnens reputation, But it seems that reputation is something they nutured over time whilst flogging whale fur in the back waters of the universe...
The Dune universe created by Frank H is still one of the most intriguing ever put to paper. I think it would be unfair to compare Brians work with that of his father in that the legend of Dune would be hard to beat. Brian has simply provided us with an insight into the organisatons and events that shaped that universe, and as someone who enjoys it I can't really complain. Except I thought that the Houses trilogy was better!
Looking forward to the planned sequel to Chapter House.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not well written... but oddly compelling, 12 Nov 2004
By 
Darren "ddvmor" (Wotton Under Edge, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This isn't a well written book. It gives the impression that perhaps the publisher allowed the first draft to go out without putting it through an editorial process.
That said, it's an oddly compelling book, like the others in the Legends of Dune series. I found myself needing to know what happens next.
If you enjoy the Dune universe and don't mind having to wince every now and again when you come across a badly formed sentence or bit of clumsy dialogue, read this book. If you can't stand to wade through badly realised prose, then... don't.
I enjoyed it, despite it's numerous flaws. That's why I gave it 4 stars!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Hurried ending to the Legends series, 11 Aug 2006
By 
G. Campitelli (Reading, Berks, England) - See all my reviews
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The Legends series, the Butlerian Jihad was a great start, the Machine Crusade was great until towards the end. The Battle for Corrin started well enough, but I felt it was rushed at the end. The Suk school, Bene Gesserit and Spacing Guild are all hinted at during this book but only really seem to spring forward coherently in the last 80pages, along with Omnius being destroyed, the Titan's being conquered and the Atriedes-Harkonnen feud.

The only Dune book I am disappointed in.
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5.0 out of 5 stars worth it:), 27 Mar 2014
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the Ominous plague has taken hold and the final battle with the thinking machines is looming.....for the Dune layman this series of books is not for them but for the avid fan highly recommended, the seeds of all the future factions are planted in the mind:)
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Battle Of Corrin, 25 Feb 2014
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By cricket imagine all the questions you could think of before you read this book, then read this book and have them all answered..........fantastic
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5.0 out of 5 stars good book, 2 Sep 2013
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really good book brings every other book in the series in line with this book well worth a read would
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Dune: The Battle of Corrin
Dune: The Battle of Corrin by Kevin J. Anderson (Hardcover - Aug 2004)
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