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45 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cognitive Behavioural Therapy In Mental Health Care - Review
Since the birth of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) many texts have been written appealing to professionals working in the psychiatric and psychological services. These have often been conducted following extensive research combined with practical applications and attempt to address the differing diagnostic disorders found in psychiatry. However, since the evidence...
Published on 17 Oct 2004 by Adrian Cockx

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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tries to be all things to all people
I'm an accredited CBT therapist and bought this book largely based on the five star review I read on Amazon.

All I can say is the book is a bit optimistic and tries to take an 'objective' view of CBT and its limits whilst at the same time appearing to do what the hard-sellers of CBT are doing.

CBT is on everyone's lips at the moment and, as a nurse...
Published on 7 Feb 2007 by Big Andy


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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tries to be all things to all people, 7 Feb 2007
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
I'm an accredited CBT therapist and bought this book largely based on the five star review I read on Amazon.

All I can say is the book is a bit optimistic and tries to take an 'objective' view of CBT and its limits whilst at the same time appearing to do what the hard-sellers of CBT are doing.

CBT is on everyone's lips at the moment and, as a nurse CBT therapist (and a trained psychotherapist) myself, who has also worked in various mental health settings over the years, the book is a bit academic and not too informative. The hard-sell approach to CBT via the Layard report and NICE guidelines, like this book, neglects to really tackle those client's experiences that don't fit into the model of changing thoughts and behaviours. I'm the first to admit that what I offer clients won't touch the really deep stuff and I know a lot of clients can't stand the CBT model.

Whilst at the moment it's great for CBT business to have veryone clamouring for our services(I've never had so much work!) it's unfair on psychotherapists and CBT therapists to suggest that because CBT has produced fairly basic evidence (what this book claims to be "the gold standard"), that somehow it can deal with every diagnosis in every setting. It simply can't and should not be promoted in that way.

I'm sorry to be a damp-rag reviewer, but it's a lot of money for a pretty mediocre text. Sorry.
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45 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cognitive Behavioural Therapy In Mental Health Care - Review, 17 Oct 2004
By 
Adrian Cockx (United kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
Since the birth of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) many texts have been written appealing to professionals working in the psychiatric and psychological services. These have often been conducted following extensive research combined with practical applications and attempt to address the differing diagnostic disorders found in psychiatry. However, since the evidence base for CBT has been firmly established and its practice widely used within the field of mental health, many texts have fallen short of appealing to a wide range of professionals working in the various environments found in the services.
What this book offers the reader is a refreshing digression from the usual nomothetic treatment manuals so often found in the field of CBT. The application of interventions for different disorders are illustrated in a manner that integrates theory and practice on a level the reader can easily identify with. The authors appear to empathically replace the jargonistic terms so often found in this field and utilise terms that relate to the individual's problem. This subsequently de-stigmatises the often-confusing diagnostic terminology found in the psychiatric and psychological services by focusing on language that relates to the problem rather than the disorder.
The forwards written by two eminent leaders in the field of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy both echo the growth of this effective psychological intervention for an increasing number of psychological problems. The authors who contributed to this book have not only focused on these psychological problems but have reflected on the context of differing environments found in the psychiatric services such as Assertive Outreach and the Forensic settings.
Finally the unique approach found in this text towards organisational, research and cultural factors relevant to the practice and implementation of CBT, are explored in a manner that is not afraid to tackle current dominant discourses that exist in these areas. This is further emphasised through the author's active encouragement of the reader to examine their own styles of practice and the environments in which they work, thus challenging the reader to look outside the box and improve their practice.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars disappointing, 19 Mar 2008
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
This is a disappointing read. I was especially disappointed by the level of understanding of recovery approaches and the expertise of people who use services and the chapter on assertive outreach. A better intro, despite it being older, is Hawton etal. I write this as BABCP accredited cognitive behaviour therapist.
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5.0 out of 5 stars good overview book, 21 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
A lot of overview information in this.
Good place to start if your new to CBT that you can then build on.
Good value for money.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Recommended, but with reservations, 28 Feb 2011
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
This is a very thorough introduction to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). It supplies the reader with an overview of the origins of the approach (as formulated by Dr Aaron T Beck) before going on to describe in detail how it might be applied in a wide variety of situations.

The book is to be commended for its clarity and detail, but unfortunately it is let down by an almost evangelical zeal for CBT. Reading this book made me think of a certain novelty song from the 1960s ('Lilly the Pink'), because CBT is effectively promoted as a 'medicinal compound' which is 'most efficacious in every case'! If this text is to be believed, CBT offers THE solution for people with anxiety, depression, violent tendencies, borderline personality disorder, delusions/hallucinations - and much more besides!

In fairness, some criticisms of CBT are addressed, such as the fact that the systems for assessing evidence-based approaches (like CBT) are not value-free, and therefore don't achieve the standards espoused by the scientific method. Another concern is that some individuals undergoing CBT might see it as judgemental, condemning the way they think as inadequate (as well as their behaviours), and thus contributing to a lack of self-esteem. Unfortunately, all such concerns are quickly (or not-so-quickly) minimised and swept away.

Despite some reservations, I recommend this book. It is invaluable for anyone wishing to master CBT techniques at an introductory to intermediate level - or for anyone else who just wants to learn about how the approach works. However, readers should not let the authors persuade them to 'buy into' CBT unquestioningly.

(Incidentally, I studied this book while working towards a diploma qualification in CBT - I am not, however, a CBT practitioner.)
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5.0 out of 5 stars CBT in mental health, 4 Jan 2009
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
Purchased this book primarily for a course a was doing. Great book, good for dipping in and out of.
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A five star read., 10 Mar 2007
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This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
This book is essential reading for both trainee and experianced cognitive behavioural therapists The book introduces the reader to the key therapy principles,skills and processes of cognitive behavioural therapy. It is a well structured and written book. What I found very useful was that at the end of each chapter there were recommended activies to follow. I look forward to the authors next book.
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8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not the best book on the subject, 2 Feb 2007
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
I work in the NHS in mental health teams and it seems to me that any reviewer who gives this book 5 stars must be a mate of the authors. The book fails to recognise the very real limits of CBT as a collection of techniques, particularly in CMHT settings. CBT is not the wonder cure assumed by such a book and suggesting that such a basic approach to thought and behaviour modification is anything other than 'basic' is flatly irresponsible.

Work in CMHT's and in-patient settings seeks to respect the context of a person's suffering using a multitude of approaches. This books fail to address such issues in-depth, taking instead a cursory internalist position that simply cannot be applied to mental health settings in the way the book suggests.

CBT has its place amongst other manual-based techniques, but as a mental health worker of twenty years standing, I know for a fact that it does not do what this book claims.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars plug the gap, 19 Feb 2007
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
I have to agree that there are limits to the cbt technique driven approach. I thought the book provided an oppurtunity to step out of this reductionist technique box however. I felt the authors were trying to understand the persons difficulties from a 'its not surprising you think and behave like this' perspective in addition to offering people a different way of understanding themselves and their difficulties; maybe people can arrive at alternative ways of perceiving, liberating them from their often shackled lives. Its only one view of course.
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5 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars All Technique and No Substance, 19 July 2006
By 
Kevin Turvey (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care (Paperback)
The strength of this book is that it looks a little wider than the usual narrow field covered by CBT. However, like many CBT books it seems to lack substance and, in the CBT tradition, rips off the techniques of every other therapy, produces so-called 'evidence' from random control trials and re-labels others' ideas as its own.

CBT is simple because it simplifies complex human beings by reducing them to thoughts, feelings and behaviours (thus the name) and, whilst such an approach is useful for some who are not aware of this reification, in spite of so-called evidence (which is not as convincing as some claim), CBT is not the wonder treatment its theorists imply.

CBT is easy to learn - this is why the market is awash with CBT self-help books. By contrast, psychotherapists are required to be in their own therapy for years as part of their training and learn far more about the complexities of human experience than CBT's politically-driven agenda acknowledges. One reason why the NHS has jumped on the CBT band-wagon is that CBT 'treatment' can get people in and out of therapy quickly, thus saving the government money. This does not mean that CBT addresses the real issues that create mental distress; merely that symptoms may be alleviated without questioning the context in which the troubled person lives.

Traditional psychotherapies work by committment to a relationship rather than a set of revamped techniques for changing thoughts and behaviours; the committment and the trust that is built between patient and therapist being the source of 'healing'. However, many traditional psychotherapies also help patient's challenge the sources of their troubles, which very often lie in the world and not simply in defective thinking.

Mental health in the UK would be far better served by therapies empowering people to question and change the unhealthy cultures and sub-cultures in which we live rather than funding band-aid treatments like CBT, which fail to address the dysfunctional family and social realities we face. Yet more and more we see CBT being heralded as better because it claims to be 'evidence-based'.

If you had chest pain, would being given a painkiller by your doctor satisfy you? Or would you rather identify and treat the cause of your pain? As an NHS psychiatrist, I know that CBT far from addresses the problems people face and, at a political level, may even be maintaining the causes of mental distress as a socio-political, and not simply a 'psychological', phenomena.
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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy in Mental Health Care by Nigel Short (Paperback - 10 Aug 2004)
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