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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for any computer user
Reading this book made me laugh until tears were running so much I couldn't see properly. My sides ached as I related to many of the wickedly funny definitions provided by the authors. An absolute must have for anyone who uses a computer.
One brief example: BNC: Abbr. for British Naval Connector, a widely used bayonet style coaxial cable connector originally designed...
Published on 14 Dec 2002 by supercrutch

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3.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a one-trick pony
My wife bought me this book for Christmas. Most people in the industry invent or collect their own funny definitions of things IT. This was basically the same joke over and over. The theme is computers are complex and break a lot, so an spreadsheet messes up your finances quicker than pen and paper. Once you've heard a few defintitions, with a few shining exceptions,...
Published on 28 Mar 2012 by Bob simms


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for any computer user, 14 Dec 2002
By 
supercrutch (Cardigan, Pembs United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Com.put.ing (Paperback)
Reading this book made me laugh until tears were running so much I couldn't see properly. My sides ached as I related to many of the wickedly funny definitions provided by the authors. An absolute must have for anyone who uses a computer.
One brief example: BNC: Abbr. for British Naval Connector, a widely used bayonet style coaxial cable connector originally designed for the wireless set on the Titanic. To join two sections of cable, a flimsy tin pin in the centre of a thin metal tube on the male end is jammed blindly into a circular socket with a microscopic centre hole on the female end, and then a rotating ring around the male end is tightened until its threads are stripped, bending the pin against the buffer surrounding the centre hole and mashing the metal tube, thus ensuring that no contact whatsoever is made.
A brilliant read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a one-trick pony, 28 Mar 2012
By 
Bob simms (Rochester, Kent, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Com.put.ing (Paperback)
My wife bought me this book for Christmas. Most people in the industry invent or collect their own funny definitions of things IT. This was basically the same joke over and over. The theme is computers are complex and break a lot, so an spreadsheet messes up your finances quicker than pen and paper. Once you've heard a few defintitions, with a few shining exceptions, you know what the next defintion is going to be. Still, as a cistern-top book to dip into, it's okay, especially for the non-IT professional.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Bigger than i thought, 2 Jan 2012
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T. Tsui - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Com.put.ing (Paperback)
This book is bigger than the pocket book 'Ski-ing' book by the same author. It has more pictures but i would prefer a smaller size to suit its novelty value.
Still, its silly and jokes about everything computer related
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