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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An original, absorbing and well-written novel
Wow! Pure is the first modern fantasy novel I've picked up in I don't know how long which has truly gripped me. There seems to be a conveyor belt somewhere routinely churning out awful bland fantasy from writers of very average ability, but I'm delighted to say that Julianna Baggott has broken the mould. Pure is the first book in what promises to be an extremely original,...
Published on 5 Dec. 2011 by Otherkin

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good attempt at an ambitious, original story, but with flaws
Pure describes a post-apocalyptic world in which a small number of 'haves' live in a sealed Dome, whereas the majority of the population struggle for existence outside the Dome, with a variety of deformities. The story follows people both within and outside the Dome, and the ways in which their lives intertwine.

The story is a very ambitious one, and highly...
Published on 18 Aug. 2012 by Max


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An original, absorbing and well-written novel, 5 Dec. 2011
This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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Wow! Pure is the first modern fantasy novel I've picked up in I don't know how long which has truly gripped me. There seems to be a conveyor belt somewhere routinely churning out awful bland fantasy from writers of very average ability, but I'm delighted to say that Julianna Baggott has broken the mould. Pure is the first book in what promises to be an extremely original, involving and, best of all, well written trilogy for young adults which older readers can also enjoy.

Pure leads us into a dystopian America, shell-shocked by a cataclysm known as the Detonations which has left the survivors genetically mutated and fighting to stay alive in a world choked with ash and inhabited by creatures that can no longer be called human. Only those evacuated to the mysterious Dome were protected from the Detonations and they continue to live in isolation from the devastated world outside, an untarnished people regarded by the survivors with fascination and jealous hatred. The story follows the intertwining lives of individuals from both within and without the Dome as they begin to learn the truth about the world they live in and the complicity of those who run it.

I found Pure instantly engaging and the quality of the writing is apparent from the very first page. The characters are real, you care about them, their universe becomes your universe. There are paragraphs within this book which are written with such beauty and subtlety that they take you by surprise. Pure is full of action and a fair amount of blood, but it never becomes coarse or gratuitous like some out-and-out action flick. The focus is always on the characters - Bradwell with fluttering birds embedded in his back, Pressia with a doll's head fused to her wrist where her hand should be, and the pure and unscarred Partridge Willux. The book's world is filled with a macabre beauty which somehow seems to reflect the real world we live in, although it is so different from our world in so many ways.

Pure gets five stars for how much I enjoyed it and for what it made me feel. Unfortunately, I do have to be a bit critical and lop a star off. The plot, although wonderfully inventive and entertaining, has holes. There are one too many magnificent rescues from the slavering jowls of death, and the conclusions that some of the characters manage to draw from the most paltry evidence is a little too convenient. I suppose I just like my fantasy believable, and it most definitely is possible to create a truly fantastical universe which is still convincingly real - look at Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea series or Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. It seems that Julianna Baggott hasn't been able to devise a way in which her characters can discover what they need to discover, so she's sort of spoonfed them the information they need. There is one particularly silly bit where Bradwell leaps to the most astonishing conclusions in rapid succession (all correct, of course) and I'm really not sure how he did it. It is a shame that some parts of the book such as this seem to be a bit rushed and not properly considered, as Baggott writes with such poignancy at other times. There is one meeting in the book which should have been one of the emotional cruces of the story but, again, it seems to have been written in rather a rush and left me quite cold.

It also seems that Baggott doesn't always trust her reader to pick up on the subtleties of her characters' emotions. El Capitan's feelings towards his brother are complicated, and Baggott uses Pressia to reflect upon the brothers' relationship so that the reader might perfectly understand what El Capitan is feeling and why. This seems a rather indiscreet tactic. It is also quite unnecessary because, in fact, Baggott draws the characters so well and truthfully that it is hard not to empathise with them. Their actions and thoughts are always comprehensible, if complex. I'd much rather get to know the characters slowly, as I would a real person, than have their whims and motives explained to me.

Despite the drawbacks, I loved Pure. It is not one of the "great" works of dystopian fiction in the ilk of George Orwell's 1984 or Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, nor does it try to be, and comparison is pointless. It is, however, a completely entertaining, electrifying, moving and creative novel with very appealing and believable characters and I can't get it out of my head. I wouldn't be at all surprised if this trilogy really took off and I'd be very interested to see it on the big screen - I've got my fingers crossed that it doesn't end up as a 12A or something. I can't wait to see what else Julianna Baggott has to offer, and the next book in the series is top of my reading list.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pure, 2 July 2012
This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
This is one of the most haunting books I have ever read. There are pieces of it which are stunningly beautiful in the author's capture of humanity's fight against dreadful odds and her description of the post-apocalyptic landscape. There are also pieces which are terribly depressing. There are scenes towards the end which made me want to cry, I felt so deeply for the characters involved.

The story essential covers the post-apocalyptic aftermath of a series of Detonations which reduce the world to nothing but glass, ash and dust. These Detonations appear to be a kind of awful culmination of atomic and nano technology causing the survivors to fuse to things within their immediate vicinity at the times of the blasts. I found the scenes with the mothers perhaps the most touching of all. There are some who have survived in a radiation-proof dome, the leaders of which are attempting to create a "new eden" for these few to emerge back into. The rest who were left behind have been left to fend for themselves by this awful distopian society. We meet Pressia, Blackwell, Partridge, Lyda and El Capitan/Helmud. The characters are wonderfully evolved, I genuinely cared for every one of them.

I found it difficult to believe this novel is rated as a YF novel as there are some really serious adult themes covered in it. Although I believe it to be incredibly important that children understand and respect the events of our history, this is perhaps a little too harsh for younger readers.

I cannot recommend this book highly enough. It is haunting, gripping, beautiful, timeless, disconcerting and so much more it defies classification. I can only stress again and again that this book is unlike anything else out there. To truly understand the breadth of this novel, it will require many re-reads. Highly, highly recommended!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Harrowing, but compelling reading..., 25 Jan. 2012
By 
Christopher Meadows (York, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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Pure is a book set in the harrowing aftermath of a global cataclysm; its world is typically a bleak and empty one. The shattered remnants of the local authorities are engaged in child snatching for sinister reasons; the cities are shattered ruins, the land and water poisoned and, in some cases, actively hostile. The survivors shown to us in the text are just that - unflinchingly portrayed as barely eking out an existence, all crippled, physically and spiritually, by their continued existence in a world which has largely been reduced to a wasteland.

In contrast to the physical bleakness of the survivors world the reader is given The Dome, a sealed environment which the devastation, somehow, did not touch. The people inside are clean, healthy, and happy - at least physically. The Dome exerts a pull over the minds of the survivors outside, a mixture of rage, hope and fascination which the author captures magnificently.
And into these intermingled worlds, of the Dome and the shattered outside, are thrown several teenagers, all of whom are struggling to define, in some way or other, who they are, and if what they believe about the world is true.

The author manages to write a remarkably compelling piece; I came in expecting a fairly typical coming-of-age novel with a little dystopian flavour, and came away in parts intrigued, disgusted and harrowed. This examination of a society after a nuclear firestorm is compellingly unflinching. The central characters carry a little of the `teen adventurer' about them, but this is gradually filed off as they move through the world. This text is, in some parts, an exploration of social, psychic and physical damage - and there isn't too much room there for the titular `Pure'.

I won't give the story away, but will note that it starts off rather slowly, gradually acclimatising the reader to the characters and their new world(s) , before ratcheting up to a surprisingly tense and fast-paced second half. The prose itself is well conveyed, the language clear and concise, with each character a unique voice - even the minor characters seem unique.

My only (slight) complaint was the discovery at the close of the text that it is to be part of a series; however, it works perfectly well as a stand-alone novel, so this is really a minor issue.

Overall, this is a wonderful portrayal of a shattered world, the death and growth of hope, and the capacity of humanity to perpetrate great acts of evil, and small acts of good. Certainly worth the read - just don't expect to have an easy time of it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing and addictive, 14 Jan. 2012
By 
Freckles (Knaresborough, North Yorkshire United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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There have been a number of post apocalypse novels over the years and this is up there among the better ones.

At the opening of the novel, it is a few days following the "Detonations" and the world is all but obliterated, when those who are left hear a droning in the sky above them. Millions of pieces of paper spin and fall to the ground. Their message is clear, but still puzzling.

"We know you are here, our brothers and sisters.
We will, one day, emerge from the Dome to join
you in peace.
For now, we watch from afar, benevolently."

Right from the start, we know that there are the haves and the have nots. A not unusual dystopian scenario, but things are far more complicated than that. Pressia and her grandfather are two of the have nots and life is a daily struggle. They exist in a destroyed former barber shop, scratching out a living and trying to stay alive. Pressia is nearing her sixteenth birthday and her grandfather is desperate for her to remain hidden from the OSR, to whom she must turn herself in on the sixteenth date of her birth.
Within the Dome, resides seventeen year old Partridge, who has a charmed existence, well removed from that of Pressia. He is attending a history lesson in a climate controlled classroom, when he is summoned to see his father at the medical centre over which he presides.

But, Pressia and Partridge are inextricably linked and far closer than they seem.

Their story and that of those people they encounter within the pages of this addictive tale, is heartrending at times. However, it is the well researched attention to detail that impresses. The terrible toll the "Detonations" have wrought on the world is painstakingly retold. Those who did not die immediately, have been left disfigured and fused to either each other or pieces of everyday objects, animals or birds. Pressia herself has a doll's head fused to her wrist, a doll she was carrying when the nuclear bombs hit when she was seven years old.

Julianna Baggott has written several books for younger readers and I think this novel would also appeal to readers from mid teens onwards.

I won't recall further details, so as not to spoil things for future readers....but read it you must. You won't regret it.

I can also see it making a great movie.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good attempt at an ambitious, original story, but with flaws, 18 Aug. 2012
This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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Pure describes a post-apocalyptic world in which a small number of 'haves' live in a sealed Dome, whereas the majority of the population struggle for existence outside the Dome, with a variety of deformities. The story follows people both within and outside the Dome, and the ways in which their lives intertwine.

The story is a very ambitious one, and highly original. There are elements of Cronin's 'The Passage', as well as elements of Stephenson's 'Anathem'.

However, sadly there are also some flaws. The characters are generally very well drawn, but Baggott negates this strength far too often by using what I think is one of the most annoying literary devices: she uses one character to explain what another character is thinking. Perhaps, to give the author credit, she felt this was necessary for a YA audience, at which this novel is directed. Even so, I think she should trust her readers and her characterisation more.

Also, the plot has some serious holes. The protagonists are saved from danger on the thinnest pretense, and the characters seem almost omniscient sometimes.

Overall, I did enjoy this book, but found myself feeling like it could have been so much more.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Everything is Broken, 19 Dec. 2011
By 
Quicksilver (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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Dystopian fiction is rarely a barrel of laughs, but 'Pure' is probably just about the darkest, bleakest speculation on humanity's downfall I have read. This is a distressing book in so many ways, not least because the cruelty displayed by some of its characters is all too plausible. It rivals 1984 in its bleak analysis of the human condition.

'Pure' is set after the 'detonations', a cataclysmic chemical and nuclear fire-bombing of the entire planet (we assume). The fortunate ones were sheltered in an impervious dome, the rest were left to fend for themselves with the promise that 'We will one day emerge from the Dome to join you in peace' there is a heavy suggestion that those inside are God's chosen few.

The story begins a decade or so after the detonations, and follows Pressia and Partridge Wilux (who rivals Ender Wiggin for a 'most ridiculous protagonist name' award). Pressia lives outside the Dome in a ruined city with areas such as the Meltlands and the Deadlands. Partridge lives safe inside. Pressia lives with her grandfather, eking out a hand to mouth existence, bartering and trading favours to survive. Partridge is the son of the Dome's designer. All children in the dome are subjected to genetic recoding; enhancements to make them more useful to the rarefied society in which they life. Rather inevitably, Partridge is unhappy with his lot, and devises a way to escape.

The power of 'Pure' is derived from Baggott's evocative descriptions of the world outside of the Dome. Everything is broken; nothing works as it should. Almost nothing can be grown, the ground is so contaminated. The inhabitants themselves are broken, both mentally and physically. Such was the power of the weapons used in the detonations that survivors found themselves fused to inanimate objects. Pressia has a dolls head fused to her hand; a hated reminder of a lost time. Throughout the book, treasured pets and loved ones have become attached to the wretches in the city outside the dome; the love/hate dichotomy this creates makes for some powerful writing. It is a highly original and discomfiting device.

It is not giving away much of the book to say that Pressia and Partridge meet. After initial mistrust, they discover they have more in common than they have any right to expect (this does stretch the novels credibility at times). Together with an intriguing, compelling and more than a little disturbing ensemble cast, they attempt to explore their shattered pasts, in the vague hope of understanding their parlous present.

There are similarities between 'Pure' and Suzanne Collins' highly entertaining The Hunger Games series, but where Collins books are about a plucky individual sticking it to the man, Baggott's novel is a much more subtle examination of the disintegration of society; the world that she has created is credible throughout. Broken bodies, broken bones, broken hands on broken ploughs, broken treaties, broken vows and people bending broken rules; it's all here. Everything is broken. Baggott weaves a terrific tale in the aftermath of destruction. 'Pure' is 'The Hunger Games' for grown ups

Though its pace is sometimes a little slow, 'Pure' is a highly absorbing novel. It is also the first in a proposed trilogy, something that only became apparent to me, as I approached the novel's end, and realised there was no way it could all be wrapped up. The novel's finale is open, and as hard-hitting and emotional as the rest of the book. It also proves that Baggott can make unflinching decisions about the fate of her characters. 'Pure' is a fine novel and a must for all lovers of dystopian fiction. I look forward to the arrival of part two.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A hideous future, 3 May 2012
By 
Bee of Good Cheer (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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I rather like dystopian future books, and this is one of the best I have read recently. It's being marketed as "Young Adult" but I'd have been seriously freaked if I'd read this as a 12/13 year old and to me, the only "Young Adult" part of it are the ages of the central characters.

Pure offers a vision of a truly hideous dystopia. A series of "Detonations" have left much of the world ravaged and ash-covered, apart from a radiation-proof, climate-controlled Dome city. The survivors outside the Dome are fused to whatever was near them or touching them at the instant of the blast - be that a toy, an animal, a rock, another person. These fusions are grotesque, surreal and at times stomach churning. Inside the Dome, life is comfortable but controlled. Everyone is monitored and genetically re-programmed and enhanced. No one is allowed out of the Dome, and only the "Best and the Brightest" were allowed in.

The story follows a number of the survivors ten years after the Detonations - both outside "wretches" and Dome dwelling "Pures".

Pressia survived the blast but lost her parents. The head of the doll she was clutching fused to the place where her hand used to be. She is about to turn sixteen and has to turn herself in to the quasi military OSR or be tracked down and killed.

Partridge is a Pure. His father is a very important leader of the community, but Partridge is growing immune to the propaganda and vows to escape when it is revealed his mother may still be alive on the outside.

Bradwell is a rebel with a number of passing birds fused to his back. He seems to know the truth about what happened prior to the Detonations, but what is the truth? People and events are not what they seem...

El Capitan has to carry his younger brother on his back, fused forever. A commander in the OSR, he oversees deathly games whilst dreaming of flying...

This book is very bleak, repulsive and violent in places but it is leavened by the warmth and strength of the characters. Julia Baggott draws them very well, and I want to know more about them, their lives and their futures. I think the fact that I could be so drawn in and disturbed by the book speaks well of the way the book, plot and world hang together in a convincing way.

Nine out of ten. And I'm looking forward to the next two books in the series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Slow build up to a good story, 18 April 2012
By 
P. Dhinsa (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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This dystopian novel is good but it just took me a bit of time to get into it. I think that this was because it takes a at least a quarter of the book before you understand how the world has come to be the way that it is.

Pressia has a dolls head in place of one of her hands, Bradwell has birds in his back! I think that these peculiar descriptions about the survivors makes the story a little confusing. Later on in the book you learn that due to experiments done by the government, when detonations were set of, people fused to things around them. I would have preferred to have known this from the beginning rather than sitting there reading thinking what??

Pressia lives with her Grandfather and dreads the day that she turns sixteen. Then the OSR (Operational Sacred Revolution) will come for her, and she will have to kill or be killed.

Partridge lives in the dome where everyone is perfect, or so they like to think. They are protected from the outside and the wretches that live in it. Partridge knows that somehow what he has been told is not the truth. He wonders about his mother and whether she really is dead. As he investigates things against his Father's wishes he realizes that maybe he needs to escape from the dome.

Bradwell lives on the outside and has more knowledge about what actually happened before the detonations. He ends up helping Pressia and Partridge, where they all discover some shocking truths.

The story is well written, with a well thought out back story explaining the way that the world has ended up. The relationships between the characters are played out really well, particularly the budding romance between Pressia and Bradwell. It is not sickly sweet but honest and genuine, they annoy each other and the reader picks up on the attraction without having it thrown in their face.

I would definitely read a sequel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Imaginative, thoughtful, terrifyingly good dystopia, 10 April 2012
By 
Manda Scott (Shropshire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
I bought this book on the basis of a Tweet from a former editor - which has to be a first (tho' probably not a last). She said that 'If you liked Hunger Games, you'll love Pure by Julianna Baggott' and while that's almost certainly true - with certain caveats below - you don't have to have liked Hunger Games to find this book an enthralling, terrifying - and utterly plausible - depiction of a future dystopia.
The action is set after 'The Detonation' which we learn fairly early was a massive, possibly worldwide, nuclear meltdown and our characters are living in the post-nuclear world.
The lucky ones, Partride and Lyda, grew up in the Dome which is the sheltered, air-filtered, pill-eating, indoctrinated world of those whose parents were smart enough to get them out of the way before the big bang happened. Partridge's father is the co-ordinator, and, as we learn, the brains behind the creation of the Dome (I don't count this as a spoiler, it's obvious from early on). Those inside call themselves 'Blessed' and those outside are 'wretches'

Those outside live very different lives and this is where this book departs so very far from Hunger Games.

HG was fine: I reviewed it on Good Reads a while ago. I liked it. I enjoyed it. I read it fast and easily and was impressed by the imagery and concept, at least of the first two. At no point was I scared. HG presents a very air-brushed, Dysney, full techni-colour, super-saturated, saccharine kind of dystopia. It's not nice, but it's clearly fantasy. You could, I imagine, read it to your five year old and while they might not get all the embedded cultural references, they wouldn't lose sleep.
I lost sleep over Pure. Or at least, my dreams took on very Pure-related landscapes. The world outside the Dome is neither Dysney nor fluffy nor in the least Technicolour.

Our two protagonists on the outside, Pressia and Bradwell, were both young when the blast took place and have both been disfigured by it; as has every single living thing in their world. Pressia has a doll's head welded onto her arm - it's become a part of her. Bradwell has living birds embedded in his back. Everyone has something, some metal/plastic/animal/vegetable/mineral something which has welded itself to their body and become a part of them.

The worst affected have become Dusts, semi-autonomous earth-based monsters that can drag a living human down into the earth and devour him/her. Some have become almost-sentient trees. The worst, for me, were the mothers who lived forever with their children attached to them, either as almost-separate kids, permanently hiding behind their skirts, or as in the worst case, reduced to a blink of an eye in one woman's arm. What really got to me was the suggestion in the book that this happened in Japan after Hiroshoma and Nagasaki and was simply suppressed by the various governments of the time who didn't want their populations having nightmares of post-nuclear life. I rather imagine that the CND would have been a lot louder, larger and more vocal if this were true. I have no idea if it is, but it sounds horribly plausible.

So in this terrifying, believable, grey, windy world, four young people, growing to adulthood meet and must find their way. How they do so is the bulk of the book and I'm not going to tell you that, but I do urge you to read it. This is a devour-in-one-breathless-breathtaking-sitting kind of a book. I can't wait for the sequels.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting adventure with a serious message, 7 Feb. 2012
By 
Debs "Little Chef" (London UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pure (Pure Trilogy 1) (Hardcover)
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This may be described as a Young Adults novel but its appeal is certainly not limited to the young market. This novel deals with some weighty issues, not least the corruption of mankind. The novel opens with a dystopian society after some sort of widespread bombing called the Detonation, which has killed thousands and left the survivors strangely mutated, or 'fused' as they are described in the book. It seems that when the detonations exploded, people become moulded with whatever was near them at the time - small electrical gadgets, glass, car parts, dogs, even their own children - and they continue to live hideously deformed and sometimes existing symbiotically with another living creature that was fused with them. Survival is hard; many people have become feral and hunt out more 'normal' people (although no-one can be called normal in this world) and strange beasts created by mutations are a constant danger. Nothing is what it seems; even dust can be a hidden danger as a monster might be lurking within. The result is a desperately frightening world where humanity and compassion are in short supply, constantly covered with choking ash that obscures the sun, and where survival is the best that one can hope for. This is the world in which Pressia lives with her grandfather, a man with a miniature fan embedded in his throat.

And yet, for some, life is completely different. For those who were fortunate enough to be inside the Dome when the Detonations went off, life goes on. They are sealed off from the troubles outside, they have not mutated, and their lives seem blessed to those who are stuck on the outside. But we are soon to find out that life inside the Dome is not perfect either. Inside the Dome strange experiments are taking place, teenagers are 'coded' to make them both more physically capable and more behaviourally compliant. Inside the Dome lives Partridge; he should be more fortunate than the rest as his father runs the Dome, and yet he is distanced from his father and fearful of him, and longs to escape to the Outside.

Eventually Partridge and Pressia meet; they soon discover that the world they each coveted is not all it seems - the Dome is not the paradise that Pressia imagined it would be and the Outside is not the free existence that Partridge thought. At first mistrustful of each other, they gradually learn to trust each other and find that each needs the other in some way, and that their ultimate goals are actually the same for both of them.

I can't tell you too much more without spoiling the story for you, but suffice it to say that there are twists and turns along the way, and that Pressia and Partridge soon learn that all is not as it seems and that the accepted beliefs that have been the foundation of their thinking for so long, are incorrect and that too often greed corrupts even the people that one should be able to trust. This is an action-packed story full of exciting elements - any book with an infinitive variety of beasts created by strange "fusings" is always going to be exciting - but it is more than that too. There is a serious underlying message here. We are never told what the Detonations are, but comparisons are made to Hiroshima and Nagasaki and radiation is mentioned on several occasions. One cannot help but think of the immediate and longterm effects of the Atom bombs when reading of the 'fusing' that occurs and the parallels are obvious - for example, there are some horrific examples of survivors of Hiroshima who had the material patterns of the clothes they were wearing burnt into their skin. When I was reading of the 'fusings' in 'Pure' I could not help but think of these. It seems that there is a serious cautionary tale within this exciting adventure story, of what human beings are capable of doing to each other.

The story also has the full range of emotional impact - the world seems desolate and cruel, and indeed those living on the Outside have little time for such emotions as love and kindness when they are struggling just to survive, but as the story progresses, love and friendships develop and personal sacrifices are made on behalf for someone else, and these seem all the more significant in the harsh background of the story.

I really loved this book. I know that there is the occasional slip up - I think I noted one where a person was handcuffed one moment and then managed to take off their clothes, unbuttoning their shirt and removing their headgear without any mention of the handcuffs being removed - and that some of the things that happen are too coincidental. However, I just don't care. The story and its message are too good for me to allow things like that to deter me. If the story was not as good or the writing was sloppy, then I might be more critical of the odd slip-up, but the plot and message are good enough for me to ignore things that might be an irritation in a lesser book. The only downside is that it is part of a series and the others have not yet been published - I don't know if I can wait that long!
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Pure (Pure Trilogy) by Julianna Baggott (Paperback - 7 Jun. 2012)
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