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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great follow up to Pure
Please don't read this review if you haven't read Pure (Pure Trilogy), the first in the trilogy.

Pure was a highlight of 2012 for me. Here is a dystopian vision utterly horrific. A vision of a near future so mangled and grotesque that you want to look away but you can't. A world in which all souls who survived the Detonations are fused with whatever they were...
Published on 20 Feb. 2013 by Kate

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Stuck in the middle with Fuse
It's often hard to review second books in a series. World building is normally done in book one and plot resolution is yet to come. With no beginning or end, we have only middle, so how to judge? 'Fuse' has this problem in abundance. It adds little to book one, remains readable throughout, but leaves the reader only with more questions.

That I feel so...
Published on 18 Feb. 2013 by Quicksilver


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Stuck in the middle with Fuse, 18 Feb. 2013
By 
Quicksilver (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Hardcover)
It's often hard to review second books in a series. World building is normally done in book one and plot resolution is yet to come. With no beginning or end, we have only middle, so how to judge? 'Fuse' has this problem in abundance. It adds little to book one, remains readable throughout, but leaves the reader only with more questions.

That I feel so discomfited signals a degree of disappointment with the book. I really liked Pure. It is dark and dirty; a dystopian vision that works, that goes deeper than just another Hunger Games clone. 'Fuse' however ploughs the furrow left by Kantiss Everdeen. Pure explores some interesting areas, such as the role of technology in human advancement and the futility of hankering for a better time. The concept of being fused to your past was fascinating. Best of all 'Pure' wasn't all about an oppressed group sticking it to their overlords. Which is exactly what 'Fuse' is.

The fragmented heroes in this book are trying to destroy the Dome and bring down its leader, Ellery Willux. The book starts slowly. The bleak existence of those outside the Dome makes for heavy reading, but things do eventually get going. The narrative becomes exciting and there are some great set pieces, but I felt the story became a string of events, with characters arbitrarily being pushed in one direction or another. It's plot development as practised by the writers of Lost.

Too often characters would suddenly acquire significant pieces of information, important landmarks would not be guarded, characters who had been useless, suddenly acquired value. Worse still, Willux, the central villain becomes a caricature of himself. He's like Mayor Prentice from Patrick Ness's Chaos Walking trilogy, with much subtlety and guile removed.

Harsh words for a book that still has much going for it. I enjoyed reading many sections of 'Fuse' and it contains some beautiful characterisation. El Capitan and his conjoined brother form a heart wrenching symbiosis that elevates the book towards something special. There is also a gripping section inside the Dome itself, about which I can say little, other than it had me enthralled and frantically turning pages, desperate to find out what was going on.

So 'Fuse' is a mixed bag; a classic middle-book-of-trilogy holding action. Always readable, occasionally moving but often contrived, it fails to build on the unique qualities of its predecessor. The book does however end with enough intriguing cliffhangers to keep you hooked for volume three. Proceed with caution.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great follow up to Pure, 20 Feb. 2013
By 
Kate (Oxford, Oxon United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Hardcover)
Please don't read this review if you haven't read Pure (Pure Trilogy), the first in the trilogy.

Pure was a highlight of 2012 for me. Here is a dystopian vision utterly horrific. A vision of a near future so mangled and grotesque that you want to look away but you can't. A world in which all souls who survived the Detonations are fused with whatever they were holding, clutching, embracing, fixing at the time of the catastrophic explosions. One of them is Pressia, the girl with a doll for a hand but uncannily practical nonetheless and she returns as our heroine in Fuse.

As Fuse begins a Wretch is found, her fusions cured, her skin soft and unblemished. But the child Wilda is unable to say anything but this: `We want our son returned. This girl is proof that we can save you all. If you ignore our plea, we will kill our hostages one at a time'. Willux, the leader of the Dome, wants his son Partridge returned. The pretence is gone. There is nothing that the Dome will not do to the Wretches scrambling for a living outside the walls. Pressia, meanwhile, is on the trail of the Seven who alone have the knowledge that Pressia and her followers need to uncover the truth behind the Detonations and the possibility of a cure from their fusions.

Among the characters returning in Fuse are my particular favourites Capitan (or Cap) and Helmud. Brothers fused together they each carry a horrendous burden. Their story develops throughout the novel more so, I'd argue, that any other. There are other familiar figures here too - Lydia, the fearsome Mothers and Bradwell. It is arguable that such is the strength of the other characters that this time Pressia's tale is less prominent.

Pure is full of images to remember. I still recall it vividly over a year on. While Fuse has less immediate impact because this rearranged and tortured world is now familiar, there are scenes here that are just as memorable. Fuse builds on Pure perfectly; it bodes so well for the final book of the trilogy. This is from a review copy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Vivid and Powerful, 19 Feb. 2013
By 
Marleen (Cavan, Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Hardcover)
I received my copy from Headline Publishing through Nudge and rated it 4.5 stars.

In this, the second book in the Pure trilogy, we meet our protagonists where we left them at the end of the book one. Pressia is with Bradwell for whom she is developing feelings she doesn't recognise or trust and trying to come to terms with the fact that she's recently found and lost her mother, discovered that her father may still be alive and the existence of her half-brother, Partridge who is a Pure, from the Dome and the son of Willux, the man who caused the destruction of the world.

Partridge is still living outside the Dome and glad to be spending time close to Lyda, the Pure girl he loves. He is also devastated following the brutal death of his mother and brother; deaths ordered by his father. But his mother left him with something; three vials containing the first step in a cure for the damage done by the detonations. If they can find the next two steps it might be possible to undo the devastation his father has caused, but their chances seem slim.

Partridge's father wants his son back and is not beyond keeping all of the people outside the Dome hostage to achieve his goal. Willux has plans for his son and nothing or nobody is going to stop him from achieving them. Faced with a possible massacre among the Wretches he has come to recognise as different but very worthy humans, Partridge has no choice but to submit to his father's demands. He has to go back inside and hope that he will be able to fight the battle against his father's evil plans from there.

Meanwhile Pressia, Bradwell, El Capitan and his brother Helmud leave on a seemingly impossible quest to find the ingredients and formula needed to create the cure. Piecing together clues left behind a long time ago they have to travel far into unknown and dangerous territories with no guarantees that they will achieve their goal or survive.

With the odds stacked against them in a volatile and dangerous world this small group of people is all the hope of survival the world has. And in the middle of violence, loss and danger these youngsters also have to come to terms with new and confusing feelings; emotions that appear to be as likely to hurt them as bring them to happiness.

Allow me to start with a warning before I get to my thoughts on this book. Do yourself a favour; (re)read "Pure" and re-acquaint yourself with the story and the characters before starting this book. It took me quite a while to get everything and everybody back in perspective. But by the time I realised that I should have gone back to the first book before starting "Fuse" I was so far into the book that putting it aside was impossible.

Because that is the sort of story this is; it grabs you by the throat and doesn't let go. The way in which this devastated world is described is vivid and all the more heart-breaking for it. It is almost too easy to picture the poor people who were outside the Dome when the detonations came and are now fused to whatever was closed to them at the time; a dolls head where her hand should be for Pressia; birds on Bradwell's back; Helmud attached to his, brother El Capitan; and all the Mothers with their children permanently fused to their bodies. The destructed landscape, filled with danger and newly formed creatures is just as easy to picture, and this only gets easier when the author introduces recognisable landmarks. Julianne Baggott did a heartbreakingly thorough job of building this world and its inhabitants.

The characters in this book aren't especially easy to like but given the circumstances that makes perfect sense. In this world the only way to survive is by looking after number one and being suspicious of everything and everyone. Sentimentality is a luxury people living outside the Dome can't afford and people inside the Dome have given up on a long time ago. But as you get to know Pressia, Partridge, Bradwell and the others better you realise that what at first appeared to be brutal and harsh attitudes are in fact necessary characteristics if they want to have a chance at surviving and succeeding. And in the midst of all this darkness there is room for occasional light and love:

"Now I feel like we weren't made for each other. We're making each other - into the people we should become." (Bradwell to Pressia)

Because ultimately these are just fragile human beings doing the best they can in an impossible situation.

I liked the way in which the author took her time while developing the characters and the story. A picture is built with great attention to detail, using beautiful and vivid words and images. This allows the reader to come to a real understanding of this world and the people that inhabit it. I also appreciate that this book doesn't end on a massive cliff-hanger. While it is clear that the story is far from over when Fuse ends, things are left at a relatively peaceful place. And since it is going to be hard enough waiting for the third and final book to come out, I can only be grateful that the author didn't make it any harder than it had to be.

This is a very well written dystopian novel, made all the more brilliant by the fact that the devastation, its cause and its aftermath are all to easy to believe and imagine. The reader should be prepared to be fascinated and horrified in equal measure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Under outside and beyond the Dome, 26 Nov. 2013
By 
Paul Tapner (poole dorset england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy) (Paperback)
Second in the Pure trilogy, a series of post apocalyptic science fiction novels for young adult readers.

Recommended reading age is thirteen and up. Due to some language, adult moments, and a rather grim setting and situation.

It follows on from Pure (Pure Trilogy). There is no exposition or recap in here at the start. So new readers shouldn't use this as a jumping on point.

Those who have read Pure, read on. Although the lack of a recap or early exposition in this does mean it might take you a short while to get into it, depending on how long it is since you read the first book.

This volume runs for five hundred and fifty pages. It has a prologue, then three parts. Those are divided into chapters, none of which are very long. Each has a different viewpoint character, out of a small group of them. Everything is told in third person present tense.

The prologue is one of those openings that seems a little strange at first read, since it's written in italics and brings in a new character in a strange setting. But hang on in there, as it will all make sense.

Then we're back with Pressia and Partridge and their associates. As they struggle to survive in the world outside the Dome. To find answers. To see what can be done about the Dome. And most importantly, about the Dome leadership's efforts to get Partridge back.

The opening part is one of those where it feels as if you're waiting for something big to happen, but pages do turn rapidly as the writing does keep you going qutie nicely while you wait for big events. The world of the story remains a very convincing and very nightmarish setting. There are a few sub plots going on also in regard to character relationships and love interests. Which are pretty good.

It does really get going when you get into part two, as Partridge is back in the Dome [this is not a spoiler, as it's on the back of the book] dealing with his father and having to adjust to his return to the place. Pressia and others are off doing other things. Which are pretty interesting too.

Their storyline is decent. And does go to some interesting places in the last part. But the last part is really great for Partridge, as what happens to him will have you desperate to know what happens next. And turning the pages rapidly. One character who figures strongly in his story does become very memorable, with some very believable actions.

This being the middle book of the trilogy, it naturally leaves lots up in the air at the end and some big cliffhangers. Which leaves all the characters well advanced from where they were at the start of the book, and you wanting to know what will happen next.

The final part of the trilogy Burn (Pure Trilogy) is on the way. I look forward to it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars unlike some book 2's this doesn't disappoint, 7 July 2013
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This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Hardcover)
Pure was one of my best reads of 2012, it was one of those books that you get to the end of and feel bereft. Fuse took the first book and expanded on it perfectly, taking the characters we already knew, and defining them, like El Capitan and his fused brother Helmud becoming more individual as Helmud starts talking and acting independently in a particularly heart rending scene. Hastings, Partridges friend from the academy has become Special Forces with his standard issue guns embedded into his arms. Fignan the black box, who I can't help but be reminded of Dr Who's K9. The imagination behind all of this is sheer genius!!!
The book not only takes us further with its characters fusing a bond between us and them, if you like, but also with plot as we learn the sickening reason Willux wants his son back. It explores the world far from the Dome, in graphic detail describing Washington DC's sad bombed landscape, and then on to Ireland where the 'dusts' become brambles.
I gave Pure four stars, I would have given this 10 and I honestly can't wait for the conclusion
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1.0 out of 5 stars Book misprinted, 29 April 2013
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This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Hardcover)
They should not be selling this book - the printing goes wrong at about page 107 and there are pages missing and mixed up. The story is good - but, why is Amazon keeping a product on sale that has been incorrectly printed? These are not being sold at a discounted price. I am not sure if the publisher has versions with the printing correct - but is it right that misprinted versions are being offloaded to customers without any warning at full price?
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5.0 out of 5 stars UNPUTDOWNABLE, 11 April 2015
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This review is from: Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) (Paperback)
Read the first book and was hooked. Ggod follow up novel. Bought it as was billed as "like the Hunger games you'll love this". Heavier going in places but still couldn't put it down. Will definitely be back to buy the third book in this trilogy. Only downer is that Julia Baggot wrote these over three years so had to wait after reading the first book in the series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loving this trilogy..., 16 Feb. 2014
By 
Liz Wilkins "Lizzy11268" (England) - See all my reviews
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After a young Wretch is abducted by the Dome and ‘cleansed’ of her fusings and imperfections, she is only able to repeat the Dome’s latest message: ‘We want our son returned. This girl is proof that we can save you all. If you ignore our plea, we will kill our hostages one at a time.’ Willux will go to any lengths to get his son Partridge back, including murder.

So FINALLY having been galvanised into action by being granted the joy of the final part of this trilogy “Burn” via netgalley I dived into “Fuse” having actually purchased it the day it was released – so many books so little time! But I adored “Pure” the first part so I was looking forward to this one and I was not disappointed.

The world created here is highly imaginative – after the “Detonations” a select few survived whole, safely protected within the Dome. The rest of the survivors “fused” with various objects and sometimes people around them and are deemed impure – scratching out an existence in a bleak and unforgiving landscape. Into this scenario come our heroes Pressia and Partridge and various other eclectic characters. In “Pure” Partridge left the dome and joined up with Pressia, going on a journey of discovery about the truth behind the detonations. That is it in a nutshell – anything and everything else I leave you to discover for yourself – and discover it you should.

As far as YA trilogies go (and remember I have yet to read Book 3 and we know that occasionally I end up in a grump and disliking the endings, no don’t say it you all know if you follow my reviews which particular tales I’m on about) I have to say this is one of my favourites so far for pure writing genius. Its emotional. Its thrilling. It is occasionally quite insane in the best way possible. It pushes the boundaries of what you can do within this genre quite beautifully and has some unique aspects to it that put it ahead of the pack. After I’ve read Burn – which is next up for me – I will be able to say whether in my opinion it is one of the best overall. Ooh exciting.

This instalment adds to the mythology perfectly, has some fascinating new developments and I LOVE that it is not over heavy on the romance. The relationships are all drawn realistically – the characters, whilst developing deep friendships and emotional attachments, spend their time concentrating on survival, discovery and important life events rather than angsting over this boy or that girl – still the emotional aspects of it are all the more meaningful because of that. When they DO stop and take a moment it means something.

Overall a terrific part two and if the finale can live up to the previous standard of writing, even if I personally am not happy with the outcome for the characters, I will have no problem with highly recommending this trilogy as one of the best out there.

Lets see! Burn awaits.

Happy Reading Folks!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing trilogy, 10 Nov. 2013
Enjoyed every minute of this book and its prequel. I would definitely recommend! Dystopia/adventure book with a really great storyline.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Essential follow-on reading from "Pure," but does not stand up well alone., 30 Oct. 2013
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For me, "Pure" was amazing reading, and there was no way I could keep myself from buying "Fuse," the next installment.
I enjoyed the continuation of the tale in "Fuse," but it certainly doesn't have the 'wow' factor of "Pure," for me. If you have not read "Pure" first, "Fuse" will make little sense to you, and even despite reading "Pure" earlier this year and thinking I retained a good grasp of the tale, "Fuse" still assumed too much about the reader's prior knowledge and memory of events, and lost me briefly a couple of times.
Added to this, the story didn't really grab me or intrigue me as "Pure" did, which I think it had every scope to do.
I am glad I read "Fuse" and I would read more work by this author, but I am afraid my ultimate opinion of the book is lukewarm.
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Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2)
Fuse (Pure Trilogy 2) by Julianna Baggott (Hardcover - 14 Feb. 2013)
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