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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping stuff!
Simon Scarrow is one of only a very few authors who have never once disappointed me and The Eagle's Prophecy, sixth in the Eagles series, is no exception. From the very start, there's excitement, adventure and action, there are also excellent characters, heartily written and full of life, and a realism evident throughout the proceedings that sets one firmly in the thick...
Published on 2 Mar 2007 by Mrs. K. A. Smurthwaite

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Story
I was lent one of the early books and enjoyed the tale that followed. Easy to read and follow and simple to pick and restart. So I got the whole series right up to "Prey". The whole story line I found from book one to this this one is great.
Now the down side. I went to purchase the next edition to this great tale and found the price had more than doubled. Mr...
Published on 30 Jan 2011 by Amazon Customer


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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping stuff!, 2 Mar 2007
By 
Mrs. K. A. Smurthwaite "Kell" (Aberdeen, Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Simon Scarrow is one of only a very few authors who have never once disappointed me and The Eagle's Prophecy, sixth in the Eagles series, is no exception. From the very start, there's excitement, adventure and action, there are also excellent characters, heartily written and full of life, and a realism evident throughout the proceedings that sets one firmly in the thick of things with Centurions Macro and Cato as they embark on another important mission, fraught with danger, at the behest of the Emperor's right-hand man, Narcissus.

There is character growth, complete with unforeseen revelations that have a major impact on all concerned, and sets things up very nicely for the seventh installment, The Eagle in the Sand, in a way that will have most readers running to the nearest bookshop to buy it as soon as possible. If all historical fiction were this good, I don't think I'd ever read any other genre!
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Uncomplicated action adventure, 21 Sep 2006
By 
Tim62 "history buff" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
If you like ancient Rome and you want your protaganists to be uncomplicated and their adventures page-turning, then Scarrow is for you.

Cato and Macro, his two central characters have improved as this series has progressed.

Now we see them outside of the comfort of Britannia, and in this case (briefly) in Rome itself before dashing off to tackle pirates in the Adriatic.

Some have pointed out that Scarrow's characterisation can be uneven, and that his description of Roman society is a tad light. There is some truth in this, but despite this - if you want an enjoyable military romp - then this is for you.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 17 Feb 2006
This review is from: The Eagle's Prophecy (Hardcover)
Scarrow’s sixth novel featuring the adventures of the grizzled centurion Macro and his able sidekick Cato takes them out of their comfort zone of the Augusta II in Britannia and plonks them in Rome. It was only a matter of time before we saw how Scarrow would deal with Rome and he neatly avoids it by having a quick trip to the races where their remaining monies are lost in a cloud of crash dust one hundred feet from the finish line and describing a squalid room in the the Subaran district. Other than a final visit to the imperial palace to see Narcissus, Scarrow avoids the place entirely.
It’s a few months after the heroic efforts of ‘The Eagle’s Prey’. Macro and Cato finds themselves penniless, out of commission and still under an execution order unless they obey Narcissus and lead a covert operation off the Ravenna coastline to recover three missing scrolls of immense value to the Empire that have been stolen by a group of pirates lead by the Greek, Telemachus and his son, Ajax. Thrown into the mix is the ever unctuous and viperish Vitellius, who has been appointed Prefect of the Fleet. The immediate antagonism followed by military ineptitude in a battle at sea results in a heavy loss for the Roman fleet and Vitellius’ attempt to blame Cato in official dispatches. Cato’s rewriting of the dispatch results in Vespasian’s arrival on the scene to direct a proper assault on the pirate’s lair, ensuring Cato and Macro are firmly thrust to the fore as the leaders and saviours of the Delphic scrolls.
During the course of the novel the scheming Vitellius somehow manages to land on his feet (and presumably Scarrow will eveentually have him meet his historical destiny come A.D 69), Macro finds his long lost mother and also the marine that stole her away from his father (there’s a nasty oedipan twist at the end) and Cato continues to mature into a fine leader of men. The paternal relationship between the two characters perfectly suits the rough and ready nature of Macro to his intellectual junior and as a pair they are formidable indeed.
This latest effort by Scarrow shows just how far his writing has come. His novels have gradually gained more and more bulk, substance of character, action and plotline. Action sequences are longer, more descriptive and thus possess more reality to them. Our two main characters have grown with Scarrow and possess immense likeability, his plotlines are clean and crisp and, above all, gripping. Reviews of his earlier novels complained about historical naivity and factual inaccuracy but that doesn’t matter with Scarrow (unlike Iggulden). These novels are quite simply superb.
Read them.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Breathlessly Compelling, 10 Nov 2005
By 
Mr. Warren M. Fisher (East Grinstead, West Sussex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Eagle's Prophecy (Hardcover)
As compelling and readable as Scarrow's previous books in the series. While not in the league of Conn Iggulden's 'Emperor' novels, few writers can deliver such simple undiluted fun - this is historical fiction as pure romp - action-packed and unputdownable. The blokish dialogue grates at times, but this is a minor quibble. For my money infinitely superior to the likes of Bernard Cornwell.
Get this book today and you will devour it in a single sitting.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Standard is Just as High, 6 July 2006
By 
J. Chippindale (England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Those readers who are familiar with Simon Scarrow's previous books featuring the Roman Legions will know what to expect in this book. They are all well written and the story lines are excellent.

In this novel Macro and Cato are being investigated following the death of a fellow office. They have been dismissed from the legions and are kicking their heels in Rome awaiting the outcome of the investigation.

While there they are made an offer they cannot refuse. The offer is made by a man they have had dealing with before. The imperial secretary Narcissus.

An imperial agent has been captured by pirates. At the time of his capture he had information vital to the safety of both Rome and the Emperor. Narcissus also sends Vitellius, an old adversary of the two centurions. The three of them set out on their quest but somehow the pirates have been forewarned of their coming and their attempt to free the agent is not as easy as they first thought.

Another exciting adventure for the pair of centurions. Scarrow seems to be able to keep the same high standards without any difficulty at all.
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22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Patrick O'Brian goes to Rome, 14 Jun 2006
This is the sixth in Scarrow's series following the exploits of two fetching characters in the Roman army of the first century.
As with the other books, the action is fast paced and vividly depicted so that the reader is right there in the heart of the battle. What impressed me so much about this book was the setting. While there are so many Hornblower type books about there's almost nothing on the Roman navy. Scarrow has set that right. The descriptions of the ships, their crews and their fighting techniques are vastly entertaining and for a writer who has based his heroes on land thus far, Scarrow has a fine feel for the sea. I just hope that he gives Macro and Cato a chance to return to nautical warfare at some point. (Although given the title of the seventh book, it looks like there will be some delay in this!)

All the characters are sharply drawn and the central relationship between Cato and Macro continues to develop in a convincing, and often touching way, accompanied by the ususal amusing banter and occasional hilarious one liners.

This series just gets better and better and to my mind rivals anything written by the biggest names in historical fiction. No, what am I saying? It's better than that. Much better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scarrow delivers!, 24 Sep 2014
This review is from: The Eagle's Prophecy (Paperback)
Scarrow delivers another excellent installment in the continuing adventures of Macro and Cato. After repatriation back to Rome for their own safety following the questionable events in Britainia, our protagonists find themselves languishing in uncertainty, with no posting, and no future in sight. Down to their last sestertius and with no prospects, their path once again crosses that of Narcissus, who tasks (blackmails?) them into a top secret assignment suited for two veterans of their "unique" resourcefulness.

Detached to naval duty on the eastern shores of the Adriatic, Macro and Cato are tasked with putting an end to piracy threatening trade and settlements, while also pursuing Narcissus' secret mission. New enemies arise, and we see the return of an old nemesis and an old ally.

Scarrow continues his fine tradition of excellent fiction interwoven with historical accuracy, and in this latest novel continues to develop the characters of Macro and Cato in maturity, as well as in backstory, continuing to reveal layer after layer of texture and depth to characters we've come to care about. Another must-read, and highly recommended.
The perfect companion to the eagle series is the ROMA VICTRIX wine beaker, Simon in his review says:
Beautifully sculpted it is a very handsome thing! The reason why I particularly like this cup is that it features the men and insignia of the second legion, the unit in which Cato learned how to become a soldier under the affectionate eye of Macro! it's a lovely thing and has pride of place on my desk right now!Calix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best in the series, 10 Oct 2007
By 
Didier (Ghent, Belgium) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
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In "The Eagle's Prophecy" Macro and Cato, having returned with Vespasian from Britain, find themselves stuck in Rome unable to find news postings to another legion. When the imperial secretary Narcissus learns of their presence he has just the job for them: pirates have been scourging the coasts of Italy, and by sheer luck three very important scrolls have fallen into their hands. Macro and Cato are to join the fleet ordered to destroy these pirates, and retrieve the scrolls. A difficult enough mission as it is, but as luck would have it their old enemy Vitellius has been appointed prefect of the fleet...

I found this a very good adventure novel, not least because of the change of scene: Macro and Cato have to face unfamiliar enemies on unfamiliair ground (or water, of you will). Combined with the skill Scarrow meanwhile has in building an intriguing plot and keeping you in the thick of action almost constantly, this makes for a very welcome addition to the series.

Very well done, I'm looking forward to the further adventures of our 2 centurions!
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book yet, Macro and Cato are back., 3 Oct 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: The Eagle's Prophecy (Hardcover)
This book came just in time.... Now read all Manfredi's work, all of Conn Iguldens work and all the Boudica series so far. This is equal to Manfredi in quality and is a real rollercoaster you don't want to get off. If you haven't read the Eagles stories then I recommend that you start now! This is the best so far and took me two days to read as I carried on reading until I literally fell asleep.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cato & Macro take to this Seas, 14 Sep 2005
This review is from: The Eagle's Prophecy (Hardcover)
What can I say, Scarrow has done it again. If you loved the previous five novels you will love this one. The format is somewhat formulaic, as Macro and Cato are thrown into another tricky mess at the hands of the Imperial Secretary Narcissus; however for fans of the books this will only heighten their enjoyment of historical romp. As usual Scarrow combines a gripping story and character development ( I shall say no more than keep an eye out for Macro's mum), with fast paced battle scenes and a tongue in cheek humour that had me chortling at times. I received this book from Amazon yesterday and devoured it greedily staying up all night. It was well worth it! If you are fans of Bernard Cornwell and the like, may I say Scarrow adds an immediacy to his characters not available always with Cornwell, his characters are instantly likeable or recognisable as 'real' people we alll know and Macro is my secret favourite! In short I loved this book! If I could marry anyone's brain Simon Scarrow would do very nicely thank you!
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The Eagle's Prophecy
The Eagle's Prophecy by Simon Scarrow (Paperback - 11 Dec 2008)
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