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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another helping, please
I have not read too much of Jay Rayner's work in the papers, or his novels, so this is my introduction to the man and his appetite. I completely fell in love with his writing - I think he has the most beautiful, original, and apt turn of phrase of any food writer I can think of today. And so funny! It must take him days to think up some of those lines. They continue to...
Published on 30 Aug 2008 by K. Johnston

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tedious at times
Not sure what I was expecting when I started this, interesting enough read about the author's search for the perfect meal however it got a little bit tedious and thankfully he also discussed other issues with the country he visited. If you are a real foodie this is the book for you!
Published 19 months ago by F Keegan


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A very narrow search for the perfect meal, 13 May 2012
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This review is from: The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner (Paperback)
Rayner may dismiss the 'cult of authenticity' but his absolute worship of the cult of exclusivity means that all you get from this book is a snobby and self-indulgent account of the most expensive and least accessible restaurants in the world. If this, rather than food, is what you're interested in then you will love this book.
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5 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Undigested, 22 April 2008
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D. M. Purkiss "Diane" (Oxford, England) - See all my reviews
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Sorry to begin on a wail of pure arrogance, but how many of Rayner's cheer squad have actually eaten in the places he describes? I found him ludicrously dyspeptic.

Ok, he does pick out what for my Euro is the best Gm-19 a Paris, L'Astrance - but what is wrong with L'Arpege? The waiters at Grand Vefour are not snooty, and welcomed my young children with great warmth. The veal at Guy Savoy is not dull, though Savoy's style of cooking is quiet rather than blazingly incandescent.

Doesn't he know of all the fabulous 15GM places in Paris? Most of his readers would find Ze Kitchen Galerie more approachable than Grand Vefour or Ducasse. And Rayner would like the thin, intellectual clientele much more.

If you really want to eat the world, you might start with good bread. Rayner pays no attention to the basics, and hence comes over like a whiny toddler. If you really want to know about the great restos of France, don't buy this book, buy Gault-Millau.

As for Anton Ego here, it's time he ate some of vrai maman's ratatouille - that movie made all the same points with more elegance and wit than Rayner can muster. That said, he's very funny on the hideous empire of Ramsay and its bloated, lazy dominance of world food, and equally telling on Robuchon in Vegas - these just about justify the purchase price.

The underlying story of greed is of course enormously sad. The author should stop doing reviews until he feels real hunger again. When he can love food again, then he can guide the rest of us to the good stuff. As of now, he's so jaded as to be pretty nearly worthless to Joe Public.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ignorance, 14 Feb 2013
By 
Alma Hodzic (Melbourne,Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner (Paperback)
Ignorance is a state of being uninformed . The word ignorant is an adjective describing a person in the state of being unaware of his/her lack og knowledge. Author of this book and many other texts on the subject of food is pure example of someone with huge Ego, but knowledge = 0 (zero).
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The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner
The Man Who Ate the World: In Search of the Perfect Dinner by Jay Rayner (Paperback - 30 April 2009)
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