Customer Reviews


11 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and Honest
Liang grew up in China during the repressive Cultural Revolution and spent years in a labour camp when her parents were exiled from the city. Her childhood experience helps to explain her utmost desire for truth and freedom. Lake With No Name tells a story of a young woman’s journey of love and loss, when her country was embroiled in the biggest political conflict...
Published on 8 July 2003 by kate_mallone

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Too self-involved by half
I approached this book with great expectations having seen an interview with the author on TV.

What a disappointment!

Th writing style is very uneven and reveals periodic flights of self-conscious attempts at lyricism that jar with the more generally pedestrian narrative.

Of greater concern, the author has little to no insight into her own...
Published on 24 Oct 2012 by Thoughtful reader


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and Honest, 8 July 2003
This review is from: The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China (Paperback)
Liang grew up in China during the repressive Cultural Revolution and spent years in a labour camp when her parents were exiled from the city. Her childhood experience helps to explain her utmost desire for truth and freedom. Lake With No Name tells a story of a young woman’s journey of love and loss, when her country was embroiled in the biggest political conflict of its modern history. Liang writes with deep emotions and honesty about herself, her lovers and fellow students who risked their lives in Tiananmen Square. Lake With No Name is a beautiful, though at times, harrowing tale of life and love.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lake with No Name - Fantastic, 7 Jun 2003
This review is from: The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China (Paperback)
This is a remarkable book by first time author Diane Wei Liang recounting her amazing journey through the tumultuous and changing China of the latter part of last century. Well written and paced it provides fantastic insight of life in China from a labour camp to the Tiananmen demonstration that was brutally repressed and beyond. Anyone interested in the personal side of real people living wihtin a totalitarian system trying to find their lives and love through historic events will be thrilled they read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Memoir, 18 Jun 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China (Paperback)
I am surprised that it has taken so long for someone to write about the Tiananmen Massacre of 1989. But I am glad that it is Diane Wei Liang who finally does it. In this moving memoir, she writes a heartbreaking love story, set against the background of those dramatic days of student uprising, bloodshed and killings. Lake With No Name is a testimony of the enduring power of life, hope and love.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A plea for freedom, 15 Oct 2011
By 
This review is from: The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China (Paperback)
A window in the brutal totalitarian world of Communist China which continues to this day. It is both a autobiography of a sensitivities, intelligent women and her experiences growing up and being a student in Communist China.
Wei Liang grew up in a labour camp that her parents were sent to during the horrors of The Cultural Revolution. she became a student at the prestigious Beijing University-the elite equivalent of Harvard and Yale in the USA or Oxford and Cambridge in Britain. There she became a keen reader of classic literature and a writer of poetry. There she also formed a deep romance with Dong Yi, a star crossed love that could not be.
It was also at Beijing University where she joined many other students in the struggle for freedom, democracy, human rights and a better life, which have not improved in China, despite its move to a capitalist economic system.
The rights the student demanded where nothing more than the basic freedoms everyone in western democracies take for granted.
The narrative moves painstakingly and slowly towards the horrific Tienanmen square massacre of June, 1989, when three thousand students, workers and others were murdered in a bloody crackdown in response to a peaceful protest for basic freedoms-an even all but brushed aside today by the western left, media and academia.
The author describes the pain and terror of these events , in which the youngest victim was a nine year old girl and the oldest a grandmother in her 70s. After the massacre the Chinese Peoples Liberation Army for weeks patrolled the streets of Beijing gunning down in cold blood students and other citizens.
After the massacre, Wei would soon leave China but would return for a time seven years later, to seek out Dong Yi. The author finishes the account by telling us where the main players in the real life drama=her friends and associates are today.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and uplifting, 9 Jun 2003
This review is from: The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China (Paperback)
One of the best China books, full of raw emotions and honesty! In this powerful memoir, Wei Liang writes with vivid imagery and poise two parallel stories: on one hand, a gripping eyewitness account of the dramatic events leading up to the Tiananmen Square Massacre, and on the other hand, a passionate and tragic love affair between the author and Dong Yi, a student leader. Wei Liang narrates with such a personal presence that you feel that you are with her in the labour camp, on top of the tank, inside Tiananmen Square and at Weiming Lake - the Lake With No Name bidding Dong Yi the last goodbye. You feel what she felt and share her hopes and dreams. In fact, despite the horrific ending that came on June 04 1989, "Lake With No Name" is ultimately a book about hope and courage of chasing one's dreams. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Survival under Repression, 15 Jun 2009
By 
vallee (Glasgow,Scotland) - See all my reviews
In view of the context of this account one wouldn't expect enjoyment as such. However the writer has moved in an interesting circle of colleagues and friends and one is easily drawn in to discover their fate. There are more loose strands than would appear in a work of fiction but one is held by the unfamiliarity of the social context and curiosity about the apparently bizarre way of running a regime. The style is conversational and well suited to the genre. The political aspect isn't allowed to interfere with the flow of the narrative.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping Intelligent Read, 15 Dec 2009
By 
diannelouise (Manchester, UK) - See all my reviews
This book helped me to understand a little about china's recent history, from the cultural revolution to the present day and especially being a university student in the most difficult time. I was gripped from start to finish by Wei's story and it was beautifully written so she is obviously a very intelligent, perceptive woman. I am now going to read her fiction to see if that is as compelling. Everyone thinking of visiting China should read this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent "can't put it down" insight to True happenings, 12 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Despite having lived in Beijing (and down the road from where a lot of this book was set) for 5 years, speaking Chinese, and knowing many who were there, I still learned an awful lot I didn't know about what happened in 1989 from this book. In particular I think the book is useful as it not only is a well rounded story, but it gives important and useful insights into why the movement started and failed, and what happened. There are learnings for how movements for needed social change must have stronger discipline in sticking to peaceful non-violent practises (think Ghandi, Martin Luther King) or efforts can backfire, and must have clear, realistic goals, not target leaders personally, and be willing to compromise and engage in realistic dialogue within the existing paradigm.
I spent a lot of time riding around Beijing, Qinghua and the Peoples Universities in Beijing, and they were well and beautifully portrayed in this heart touching true story. Some explanation is provided for why efforts died such a death and so many left behind their dreams. Yet the dream for deserved freedom, democracy and true justice remains, and we must understand more about this important and heart breaking history to peacefully create a better future together. Well worth reading for lovers of China to understand how this might be created one day. Makes me want to learn more and more Chinese!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Too self-involved by half, 24 Oct 2012
I approached this book with great expectations having seen an interview with the author on TV.

What a disappointment!

Th writing style is very uneven and reveals periodic flights of self-conscious attempts at lyricism that jar with the more generally pedestrian narrative.

Of greater concern, the author has little to no insight into her own or others' thoughts or emotions, despite her bachelor's and master's degrees in psychology. Even worse, her tentative, sporadic and very modest involvement with political events is viewed in her mind as being of great moment, even though she was really never very involved nor put herself in any direct danger. In contrast, the constant emphasis is on pursuit of her very-important career.

It is a pity that this book is so shallow in its political analysis, and so self-involved as a supposed love story. The final meeting in New York City after many years with the object of her dreams is embarrassing in its tawdriness. I felt real pity for the poor guy who failed to measure up to her expectations. Perhaps her mystery nooks are more successful because less demanding of personal insight.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Lake with no name, 7 Sep 2009
By 
Ms. V. J. Walker "VJW" (Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I ordered this after seeing the author interviewed by Michael Peschardt. I enjoyed the book and found it moving. However her style is not particularly good; I think it is obvious that English is not her first language. I do not think I shall be reading any of her novels.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Lake with No Name: A True Story of Love and Conflict in Modern China
Used & New from: £0.14
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews