Customer Reviews


21 Reviews
5 star:
 (16)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, lyrical story of restrained love and old-fashioned values.
Sue Gee has created here a love story with true depth of feeling, displaying the sometimes darker side of country life in Victorian England. A melody of prose surrounds her central character, a young curate sent to assist an ailing vicar at a Herefordshire parish in the winter of 1860.

The young Richard Allen, still mourning his father's recent death, displays...
Published on 28 Feb 2008 by S. Barnes

versus
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too slow
I had previously read Sue Gee's 'Reading in Bed' and absolutely loved it. Sorry to say that 'Mysteries' was far too slow for me, and I only got to page 75 before I reluctantly had to abandon it. Surely something has to happen in 75 pages apart from endless descriptions of weather and countryside, two meals and slow discourse? On the plus side the feel of the winter and...
Published on 2 Aug 2010 by Lovejoy


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful, lyrical story of restrained love and old-fashioned values., 28 Feb 2008
By 
S. Barnes (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
Sue Gee has created here a love story with true depth of feeling, displaying the sometimes darker side of country life in Victorian England. A melody of prose surrounds her central character, a young curate sent to assist an ailing vicar at a Herefordshire parish in the winter of 1860.

The young Richard Allen, still mourning his father's recent death, displays a genuine love for his God, his family whom he has left behind, the rural community he is to serve, and the countryside around his new basic and rustic home. However, all of his simple and profound ideals are challenged when he falls helplessly in love with a young married woman of important social standing. There is a wonderful purity and innocence to this love, and yet the young curate clearly also has a geniune talent for his vocation serving God... a very difficult predicament to be in and you can only feel sympathy for this young idealistic man.

The story is beautifully told; a compelling read. You cannot rush this book - you simply have to go with it at its own pace and I slowed my, usually quick, reading pace to appreciate this novel at its best. So much more than just another historical romance, I can recommended this novel highly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderfully unputdownable!, 28 Mar 2005
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Hardcover)
I loved this book! I found it a wonderful demonstration of how everyday events are by far the most magical. The main characters are intensely memorable in their conciousness of the relationship that is forming between them, against all proper codes of conduct in 19th Century Britain - it illustrates perfectly that we do not choose who we love.. There are some books I guard carefully and this will certainly be one of them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too slow, 2 Aug 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
I had previously read Sue Gee's 'Reading in Bed' and absolutely loved it. Sorry to say that 'Mysteries' was far too slow for me, and I only got to page 75 before I reluctantly had to abandon it. Surely something has to happen in 75 pages apart from endless descriptions of weather and countryside, two meals and slow discourse? On the plus side the feel of the winter and the frozen countryside WAS very well written - just a bit too much of it. Although the ethos was 'of' the mid Victorian period, writing in such a slow burning way just didn't work for this 21st century reader. Anyway, I'm in the minority so maybe I just didn't try hard enough
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding read, 29 Mar 2009
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
This is a richly satisfying novel: complex characters, stunning prose, full of ideas and wonderfully shaped. Gee creates an intimate but claustrophobic world - in a remote parish in Hereford 1860 - that is also threatened by the advent of the railway and new ideas. She examines how stifling this word has been especially to women labouring under the heavy burdern of duty. The central characters battle to understand their faith and to resolve complex moral choices but because of the quality of the writing and the rich array of characters this is always totally engrossing. A must read - I couldn't recommend it more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't judge this book by its insipid blue cover ..., 20 Sep 2008
By 
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
Because it is hauntingly, beautifully written, a story of forbidden love and Victorian hypocrisy. Sue Gee's descriptions of the passing seasons in a Herefordshire country parish are exquisite, and although I am far from being a religious person, I was moved by her description of the young curate's palpable love of God and his struggles when he finds himself overwhelmed by love for a married woman. Indeed, Sue Gee has the rare gift of writing movingly, sparely, without mawkishness or awkwardness about those difficult subjects ... love, God, and sex .
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Mysteries of Glass, 5 Jun 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Hardcover)
Sue describes local characteristics of border life with charm and a careful eye. Her setting today is an unspoilt valley, yet her narrative transports you to the period of industrial and emotional change that it was in the 1860's. She has unexpectedly highlighted a rare anomaly in the modern world. Where once there was industry there is now tranquility and calm - a setting which has moved in reverse. This is a gentle read that soothes the soul, and reminds us that bereavement, escape and the anguishes of a divided heart are not unique to us, but are the subjects borne by generations that went before in an often troubled world.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful, lyrical book, 19 Oct 2007
By 
Mrs. KE Melia - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
This is the first book I had read by Sue Gee and it won't be the last. I loved it. From the first page I was hooked and everything was so beautifully described that I immediately felt that I had stepped into the time and place in which it is set. The relationship between the two main characters is built up beautifully. To be honest, rather that not being able to put it down I found myself reading it slowly, chapter by chapter, in order to enjoy it all the more. It stayed with me for ages afterwards.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautifully evocative read, 23 Aug 2009
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
This is my fourth Sue Gee book and by far the best to date though I loved the others too! She writes with the bleakness of D.H.Lawrence at times. The love story also reminds me of 'Love for Lydia' by H.E.Bates, 'A Room with a View' by E.M.Forster and Ian McEwan's 'Chesil Beach'. I savoured every page because it was so beautifully written. The opening pages actually made me weep because the evocation of the winter scene was so movingly and yet sparely written. The reader can empathise with Richard Allen, the hero of the piece. You might expect a happy ending, a romantic ending or a tragic ending having followed the plot but the actual ending is different from any expectation. I love this book and highly recommend it to those who like a gentle and slow read rather than a fast-paced page-turner. Having said that, it is difficult to put down and I longed to read it each day. You would not think it was written by a living author but somebody from the 1800s! Simply beautiful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful read, 2 Jun 2007
By 
Ms Georgina L. Gowland (Ashford, Middlesex, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
This is a lovely gentle book full of well drawn images of the countryside. The character of Richard is three dimensional and as the story progresses you share his struggle to do what is right. Enough said - don't want to give anything away.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Deceptively Gentle Novel, 28 Oct 2005
This review is from: The Mysteries of Glass (Paperback)
This is a beautiful novel expertly written. Its opening is unassuming yet immediately pulls the reader into that cold arrival into a rural winter night. The themes that the novel addresses: adultery, betrayal, religious doubt are harrowing indeed and yet these themes are delivered in a gentle, flowing style that creates an almost deam-like atmosphere and underlines Richard's increasing alienation from the life he has chosen for himself. There is no melodramma, just a haunting serenity that plays so well against Richard's mounting anguish. That said, the ending offers a superb release of much of the tension that builds up - ever so gently - over the course of the novel and Richard proves himself to be very much a hero.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Mysteries of Glass
The Mysteries of Glass by Sue Gee (Paperback - 2 May 2005)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews