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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent read.
I did not have the luxury of being able to read this novel in one sitting which was a shame as it was so captivating I really wanted to read on and on. However I couldn't wait until I picked it up again and it was easy to remember where I had left it.

The story is basically that on the morning of Nick and Amy Dunne's fifth wedding anniversary Amy goes missing...
Published 21 months ago by mrsb2011

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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps I was expecting too much
I absolutely love mysteries. So I expected to love this book.

But I didn't. Perhaps it's because my expectations were too high based on all the buzz for this book. Perhaps it's because I've read thousands of books in my life and a mystery has to be extremely well-written for me to be amazed by it. Perhaps I couldn't enjoy it as, having been in a long-term...
Published 14 months ago by illegiblescribble


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30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps I was expecting too much, 28 Mar. 2014
This review is from: Gone Girl (Hardcover)
I absolutely love mysteries. So I expected to love this book.

But I didn't. Perhaps it's because my expectations were too high based on all the buzz for this book. Perhaps it's because I've read thousands of books in my life and a mystery has to be extremely well-written for me to be amazed by it. Perhaps I couldn't enjoy it as, having been in a long-term relationship with an extremely self-absorbed, toxic partner, I had absolutely no interest in experiencing any more of it in my life.

The first half of the novel is somewhat of a mystery. The vanishing of a wife and the consequences of that disappearance are relayed to us through alternating excerpts from the husband's first-person narrative and the wife's diary entries.

But then, halfway through, the mystery is over. We know what happened. And all that's left is just graphic descriptions of horrible things done by horrible people. What a disappointment.

This novel is a deconstruction of the relationship between two extremely self-absorbed people who -- if they could ever manage to be honest enough with a psychiatrist -- would likely be diagnosed with either Narcissistic Personality Disorder or Borderline Personality Disorder.

Ultimately, I did not end up caring about either character, and felt that they both got exactly what they deserved. I just felt sorry for the undeserving third character which was going to have to spend a lifetime being subjected to them.

If you like the kind of sordid horror fiction which hits the bestseller lists, or you've not had to deal with sociopaths in your real life, you will probably enjoy this.

But if you're a serious reader of clever and intelligent mysteries, or you find sociopaths tiresome rather than interesting, you may find this as unsatisfying as I did.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent read., 1 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
I did not have the luxury of being able to read this novel in one sitting which was a shame as it was so captivating I really wanted to read on and on. However I couldn't wait until I picked it up again and it was easy to remember where I had left it.

The story is basically that on the morning of Nick and Amy Dunne's fifth wedding anniversary Amy goes missing. Nick has been out early to get some last minute things to celebrate he comes home to find the door wide open and Amy gone. There looks to have been some sort of struggle in the living room but other than that there is nothing. Nick is number one suspect and has nothing to prove where he was at the time this happened although he swears he did not kill her. We see the trial by media of Nick played out in front of the public which condemn him and Flynn shows how easy it is to make someone look guilty with no actual proof. Amy's diaries are found in the house which she has written since she first met Nick up to the time she disappears and they paint a very disturbing picture of Nick and hint that Amy is afraid of him which adds to stack up a pretty `conclusive' case against him.

The story is so cleverly interwoven and expertly written to play with your mind that by the end of the novel I felt as if I had been through a psychological journey with the characters. It has so much going on, murder, manipulation, marital breakdown, twists and turns and perfectly crafted toxic characters that makes you feel one moment Nick was the `villain' to changing your mind the next and making Amy the `villain'.

It is a masterly piece of writing that questions how well we can ever know each other and especially the people that we love. How an innocent action or word can toss someone over the edge without you realising it until it is too late - brilliant suspense. The first person narration allows us to be Nick and to see through his eyes and hear through his ears, this lets the reader get to know him and to form an opinion of him, allowing us to `experience' all that he goes through so that by the time the police and media have labelled him as a cold hearted killer we can't quite go with this. Nick is flawed, he is evasive but on the whole he appears to be a genuine and good person.

However we then have a narrative by Amy his wife who talks to us via her diaries which makes the reader unsure of whether she is dead or not, and Amy paints an altogether different picture of Nick as the book progresses. Amy's account through her diaries makes the reader very empathetic with her, she tells of brutality by Nick and how she becomes afraid of him. I then really believed Nick was capable of murdering her but there was a little niggle that all was not right with Amy. And it's not really until Part Two `Boy Meets Girl' that we begin to see Amy in a different light.

Because we think we know what has happened (Amy has been abducted or killed) we start to make assumptions, this is very clever as Flynn uses this to connect us to the characters, they are making assumptions about each other too, they don't really know what each other is thinking or feeling, what each one is capable of, and of course we know that as this is a psychological thriller there will be red herrings along the way.

The novel is very much a product of the present times and Flynn manages to link the reader through the emotional roller coaster that both Nick and Amy feel with the loss of their jobs, the damage this is doing to their relationship, family trauma of Nick's mother dying and having to return to his family home which makes it easy to identify with them both.

Overall the book was captivating, intriguing, cleverly crafted and a very good psychological thriller with a lot of curve balls thrown in so I would give this book a 5 star rating.

I suppose the only disappointment was the end, without giving this away it didn't really tie the ends up for me tight enough, there was unfinished business. It would have been good to have the ending clearer but having said this there is enough material for a sequel here if Gillian Flynn has that in mind - I hope she does!

For this reviews and others please visit Mrsbbooks2011.blogspot.co.uk
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363 of 398 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Read - Apart From The Ending, 25 Aug. 2013
This review is from: Gone Girl (Kindle Edition)
Amy and Nick are married for five years, but there is not much harmony left. All of a sudden, Amy is missing. And from there, a more and more surprising and devious plot develops, cleverly and elegantly put together by a very talented writer.

It is difficult to talk about the plot without risking spoilers. So let's say this: It is not a conventional thriller. There are twists and totally surprising developments, we are getting manipulated and are lied to by both protagonists. It's not only a thriller, the book is also about unconventional truths about love and marriage. Sadly, the ending is a disappointment. Best not to expect too much from it and just enjoy the reading of the novel as such.

The book is always straightforward and readable, but maybe there are a few digressions too many. I can't help but feeling that nowadays thriller writers feel the need to expand their books to 600 pages when 400 would have done just as well. That's stupid, because it automatically weakens the suspense.

Gillian Flynn really deconstructed love and marriage here a lot, so I have a suggestion for readers who would like to read a (shorter) crime novel which is thrilling, full of dark humor and lets you believe in love again: Heads Off (A Lisa Becker Mystery)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Give me my 13 hours back..., 31 Oct. 2014
By 
This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
How do you plough on through a book when you hate both characters, know that the storyline is clunky, tedious and unbelievable and ends like a damp squib? Read this book and see. No, better, bin this book and read a good book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars AMAZING AMY, 31 May 2015
This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
Nick and Amy meet - fall in love and marry. Amy is the only daughter of successful psychologist parents who became famous for writing ‘Amazing Amy’ children’s books based on their daughter as she was growing up.
Amy is wealthy and has a private trust fund. Nick came from a more humble background. He was not close to his father however was close to his mother and twin sister, Margo ‘Mo’.
Nick and Amy are successful writers and live a privileged lifestyle in New York until the recession hit hard and both lost their jobs.
Amy parents also hit by reduced book sales and their lavish lifestyle teeter on the verge of bankruptcy until they ask for the return of a large chunk of Amy’s trust fund.
Unable to support their New York lifestyle Nick and Amy move to Nick’s home town, Missouri, to help care for Nick’s parents. His mother has cancer and his father suffers with Alzheimer’s disease.
With no job prospects Amy agrees to help Nick and Mo purchase a bar with the remainder of her trust fund.

They are approaching their 5th wedding anniversary. By now Nick’s mother has died and his father is in a nursing home. On the morning of their anniversary Amy’s goes missing and foul play is suspected.
The police suspect Nick of being involved in her disappearance. All evidence and clues point to Nick’s guilt and Amy’s diary tells a different story to that of Nick’s.

This is one of the best thriller novels I’ve read in some time. The story constantly ‘twists and turns’ and stumped me to the very end. However I wish it had ended differently!
The storytelling was brilliant and I was totally engrossed!

I will certainly name Gillian Flynn among my top authors.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Late to the bandwagon... But I can see why it's been a bestseller, 10 Jan. 2014
By 
K. J. Noyes "Katy Noyes" (Derbyshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Gone Girl (Audio CD)
4.5 stars.

This book really works well on audio - with two voices portraying the characters through their thoughts and diaries, even changing tone as the characters we come to know turn out to be very different...

I love 'unreliable narrator' stories, I like being surprised by a writer and fooled into seeing their world one way and finding out they've outwitted me. Knowing before I started that this book was of this genre, I was looking forward to the journey through.

And I did enjoy it. I loved the major twists, the dark heart of surface-perfection-marriage between Nick and Amy, the scheming, the downright evil versus flawed characters of he couple. I didn't really like the ending - I was disappointed for the characters that the ending I felt was justified didn't appear. But it was still a great little psychological thriller.

Friends of mine have been annoyed at the character name of 'Go' and I must say this is doubly annoying on audiobook - a very strange and jarring nickname.

But I Ioved Nick and Amy, I really did. I loved their alternate accounts of their marriage, the disappearance of Amy and what happened. How all was not as it seemed. And the events after, of course. The media angle was great - how they prey on victims and easy targets, sensationalise every angle. And the Amazing Amy story - books for children written by Amy's parents, play a role in the story. Cleverly weaved in, I thought.

A ride and a half. Great to listen to. Characters to outright hate and to feel pity for, it's a fun read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent and expertly made thriller full of real characters, 9 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Gone Girl (Hardcover)
This irresistible thriller, written by American author Gillian Flynn, tells the story of Amy and Nick Dunne, a New York pair who relocated to his Midwest hometown because of recession and family problems. More important, with brutal precision, tells the story of their marriage, which is collapsing under financial and emotional strains. I enjoy reading, one book per week at least and with this one I was barely able to stop reading it until the end.

We are confronted with painful reality about human relations and marriage affecting everyone and throughout the book you keep asking yourself how to keep spark alive when sweet honeymoon relationship period fades out.

For so many people who face big problems in marriage, who finally get to know his/her husband/wife after some time that would not be revelation, but for all others question can be asked how well can you ever know the person you married, the person you sleep every night, the person who was meant to be soul mate of yours?

Gone Girl starts on a sunny Missouri day -- the morning of the Amy and Nick's fifth wedding anniversary. Amy is making crepes for breakfast when her husband, Nick walks into the kitchen thinking 'Bile and dread inched up my throat". That first picture leaves the readers in no doubt that whatever type of marriage it is, for sure it is not a happy one.
Nick went to work in the bar he and his twin sister have bought with Amy's money but some time afterwards, a neighbor will phone to inform him their front door is wide open. Inside he will found blood and shattered glass, Amy is gone. Gone girl.

Throughout the book, Amy and Nick speak to the reader directly. They both have their side of story and they tell it day by day in form of diary entries.
Because their stories are so conflicting only one is telling the truth, or because they have been lying to each other is it possible that they are lying to reader as well?

We would learn how they met at a Brooklyn party, Amy pretending to be the "cool girl" to impress Nick. Of course you know what the cool girl is. She plays video games, drinks cheap beer, loves sex, eats junk food while 'somehow maintaining a size 2'.
It seems that Amy also despise men solicitous of their wives, calling them "dancing monkeys" performing pointless tasks and execute "myriad sacrifices" for their demanding wives.

Gillian Flynn's novel raises some frightening questions about the dark side of marriage exposing cunning cruelties that are ruining long-term relationships; the small victories seized, the moral high ground claimed, the emotional power plays that can and will slowly destroy love.
"Gone Girl" is an intelligent and expertly-made thriller full of real characters, so real you think you know them. Despite novel's darkness, lot of people see gloomy portrayal of a marriage gone awry strangely comforting. Or as one reviewer brilliantly said "Read Gone Girl -- and stay single".

In the end probably some of the married readers will be reassured that no matter how difficult their own relationship might be it is an improvement on the poisonous Amy and Nick's marriage. Their union plunged in rage, anger and worse emotions.

During the ascending tension in the book, author will be making some sharp observations about human relations, men and women roles when they are couple and the ungraspable idea of being happy ever after. As Amy would say "Friends see most of each other's flaws. Spouses see every awful last bit".

There is something irresistible-to see-unfolding in the spectacle of a husband and wife, who finally understand that they don't really know each other. And one inconvenient question remains in the air - we all knows that behind closed other people's doors no one knows what is going on, but can we be sure what is really happening in our relationship?

"Gone Girl" is proving that marriage can be a real killer and this book will be killer of your free time, for sure. Until you finish it, you will not be able to put it off.

Highly recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pacy page-turner with a refreshing twist on the 'good wife'..., 9 Aug. 2013
By 
Carole-anne Davies "sparkla" (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
As thrillers go this clear-voiced tale from the dexterous Gillian Flynn is an absorbing read with just the right amount of tension. I got through it in a few days and was engaged from page one - which is increasingly rare! The writing is tight and the narrative voice clear from the off - depending on which narrator you're locked into that is...The structure plays with omnipresence and reliability throughout and comments on concepts of love, loyalty and emotional blackmail in an incisive manner. It also exploits the real and the perceived and plays with our assumptions and expectations about people and who they really are, through great characterisation. You'll love, hate, be angered and sickened by turns, as the full cast of despicable/flawed/damaged/morally ambiguous dramatis personae take their stage. Amy, the Gone Girl of the title, who is missing presumed dead/murdered, is all sugar and spice; perfect in every dimension. Or is she? What role have her parents really played in shaping her? How reliable is husband Nick and what has he done with Amy? Can he get a credible story over to the police and if he can, is it true? Each of these character's flaws make them more believable and aside from one or two moments where suspending disbelief is essential - such as the pregnancy test explanation and the vomit jar (you'll see what I mean) - they are totally absorbing. The outcome may or may not satisfy all readers and it could be said to be little too neat - however, overall this is a great read and an enjoyable tale. It's a great book club choice as it sparks so many polarised opinions. Flynn uses her characters, especially Amy and Nick, to say things about women and men, parents, husbands, wives and lovers, that very few would dare. Frequently she says things about women and the 'sisterhood', that many might be thinking but few would ever air. As a female reader I found that deliciously spikey and very enjoyable in an 'oh my! I can't believe she just said that!' sort of way. Bold, pacy, tense in the right places and very entertaining, Gone Girl is a great summer thriller and an intriguing indicator of Flynn's increasing skill and confidence as a writer. Enjoy the riddles and enter the dark spirit of the hunt and you'll have a shockingly good, if slightly murderous, time!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, 3 Feb. 2015
This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
Gone Girl. A book that has been sitting in my *to read* pile for quite a while. I was aware of the hype surrounding this and was intrigued to get started.

It took me a while to settle into this. It required quite a lot of concentration throughout so if you're looking for a light easy to follow read, I wouldn't recommend this.

I expected a twist to this book which didn't really happen. Instead this crazy "what the hell is going on" plot emerged. I genuinely felt uneasy whenever it flipped to Amy's side of the story. There was this creepy "can't live with you, can't live without you" theme which definitely played on my mind. An interesting read!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dull, dull, boring, slow and dull., 21 Jan. 2015
This review is from: Gone Girl (Kindle Edition)
Picked this up because of all the good reviews but feel I just wasted my time and money on this book. Struggled to get 1/3 of the way through and gave up. So I don't know how it finished but quite frankly, I don't care. I decided years ago that I don't need to waste my time reading dull books when there are so many good ones out there. I can only presume those who gave it a good review don't read much or have no idea what a good book is.
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Gone Girl
Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn (Paperback - 3 Jan. 2013)
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