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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good sequel to the author's Bloody April
The author's Bloody April (2005) was a fine historical account of the air war in the Arras sector in 1917. It showed how the romantic view of the war in the air as being fighter versus fighter was no longer true--two-thirds of the British planes in that sector were two-seaters, and the primary role was photo reconnaissance and artillery spotting, with trench-strafing,...
Published on 21 Aug. 2007 by David W. Straight

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Basically a series of memoirs and letters strung together
While not going as far as the other reviewer who gave this only one star, this book and Peter Hart's very similar "Bloody April" are basically a series of letters and contemporary correpondence strung togther with an overview of the war in 1918.

In particular there was little on the "aces" in the title who appear as almost passing characters, rather the book...
Published on 25 Aug. 2011 by G. Mott


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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Basically a series of memoirs and letters strung together, 25 Aug. 2011
By 
G. Mott (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Aces Falling: War Above The Trenches, 1918 (Paperback)
While not going as far as the other reviewer who gave this only one star, this book and Peter Hart's very similar "Bloody April" are basically a series of letters and contemporary correpondence strung togther with an overview of the war in 1918.

In particular there was little on the "aces" in the title who appear as almost passing characters, rather the book concentrates on the stories and comments of the ordinarly aircrew, presumably as these are available through Peter's work at the Imperial War Museum.

These tend to have a certain repetitivenes "Huns diving out the sun, windscreens shattered by bullets etc" and after the first few, dont give a huge amount of insight.

One large gap in this book is any background information or statistics. Lots of different types of aircraft are mentioned but there is no technical glossary and even what they looked like is often not clear as only a handful are illustrated in the photos. An Appendix listing aircraft types and their capabilities would have been very useful and added to the book significantly.

There was also none of the background information which make Martin Middlebrook's books so compelling, eg squadron loss and kill rates, even a table of the highest scoring aces would have been of interest.

Overall just about worth it but not up to the standard of his Somme book which is excellent.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 21 July 2014
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Ps Beer - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Aces Falling: War Above The Trenches, 1918 (Paperback)
very good book
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars, 3 Jan. 2015
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Interesting but, for me, more a collection of quotes about experiences rather than a learned analysis
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14 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Don't buy this, buy Winged Victory., 7 Oct. 2007
By 
J. Busby (London, England.) - See all my reviews
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This book is very long, very boring and very badly written. It achieves the difficult feat of making the story of the 1918 air war tedious.
It is very boring because, contrary to what Peter Hart thinks, quoting lengthy extracts fom memoirs and recorded reminiscences that were not intended for publication is not 'powerful'. This is no disrespect to the men who produced them. In addition the extracts are too long, inevitably similar in content, and are printed in an unpleasant grey typeface which makes it easy to skip them.
The book is also boring because Hart has used an extremely limited number of published sources, all written in or translated into English. I suspect that he cannot read French or German, which may account for his failure to mention the French Air Service. I do not believe his 'reasons of space' excuse in a book of this length. It would have been better to call it the RAF's War over the Trenches. For a much more readable account try the maestro Robert Jackson's Aces Twilight or Air War Flanders 1918.
As for the writing linking these passages, I think that even a journalist might be ashamed of it. Cliches, slang, mixed metaphors, use of italics for emphasis and more. Writing this lazy and slovenly demands a good editor. Hart has not got one.
In conclusion I am glad to say that, having read one of Hart's books before I took the precaution of borrowing this one from the library. If you want to know what the 1918 air war was like, don't buy this, buy the greatest WW1 novel, Winged Victory by V. M Yeates.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 5 July 2014
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VERY GOOD
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Aces Falling: War Above The Trenches, 1918
Aces Falling: War Above The Trenches, 1918 by Peter Hart (Paperback - 2 Oct. 2008)
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