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on 3 March 2010
"Men of Air" is fairly accurate and depicts realistically life as I remember it when flying in Bomber Command in the winter of 1944/1945. There are still a few of us left.

W.T.M. 76 sdn.
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on 24 August 2012
Men of Air picks up roughly where 'Bomber Boys' left off - at the beginning of 1944. These were dark days for the aircrews of Bomber Command, life expectancy a mere six weeks. The German night defences had been polished into a very cohesive unit, flack, searchlights and radar controlled night fighters worked together homing in on the nightly bomber stream with ruthless efficiency. As with his previous book, Wilson tells the story of these young men in an evocative and emotive way, bringing the reader right into the gun turret or cockpit as the aircraft is buffeted around the unforgiving skies over Germany. Again, a wealth of personal accounts and anecdotes and sterling research Men Of Air: The Doomed Youth Of Bomber Command (Bomber War Trilogy 2)bring this story to life and Men of Air is a very fitting sequel to Bomber Boys, if you enjoyed one, you will not be disappointed with the other. A 'must read' book for those who have an interest in the war raised against the Third Reich by the young men of Bomber Command.
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on 7 July 2015
This book is a good introduction to the activities of Bomber Command throughout the Second World War and is brought to life by hundreds of first hand accounts of the action. The trouble is that the majority of these accounts were gained first-hand by the author at the time of his research and so they are all 70-plus year old accounts which suffer from the passage of time and don't really add that much of interest to the narrative. In addition many of the accounts feel that they have been just shoehorned in for the sake of it and the narrative worked to fit around what the author happened to have. It's not all bad though as there are several archival sources which add more authenticity to proceedings, as well as many interesting individual stories. The book also loses its way towards the end and contains a fair bit of twaddle.

So, a thoroughly researched book, but perhaps a bit too lengthy. I found it heavy going and took me ages to get through and was certainly glad to get to the end..
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on 16 November 2013
Men of Air is not so much about the air war itself as it is about the men who flew the incredibly dangerous missions over Europe. It is the story of the crews asked to fly missions where every member of every flight crew knew the odds of coming back alive were not in their favor.

What I enjoyed most was the way I could almost listen to the conversations that were taking place among the crews. The book is full of first hand accounts of these crew members as they flew the missions, dropped the bombs, and were being shot at. Crews had to bail out after being hit or running out of fuel, often ending up in POW camps. Crew members recollections about life in the camps, and attempted escapes, add more detail to the story.

This is a great story of the bomber crews flying over Europe in 1944. I highly recommend it.
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on 19 July 2014
The second book of Kevin Wilson's trilogy covers 1944. As with the first book, the author let's those involved tell their story. Once again, it is impossible not to be struck by how ordinary young men performed such acts of bravery, day in day out, with the fear of death or capture ever present.

There was a one in five chance of surviving a tour; losing friends, colleagues, brothers was a seemingly daily occurrence. During the winter, the possibility of victory seemed distant, but Bomber Command's determination and perseverance meant that by the end of the year progress was being made.

Whilst this book is a good historical record, its true value is in the story of humanity. These men were, and still are, real, ordinary, yet extraordinary.
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on 17 July 2008
This is by far the most engrossing and informative book about the bombing campaign I have read.
It uses vivid personal recollections to bring to life the campaign and what life was like for those serving.
Anyone who wishes to criticise bomber command should read this book first and they will understand why it was necessary and the terrible sacrfices those involved made.
eg Being blown alive out of an exploding aircraft without a parachute was a common way of dying.
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on 11 February 2010
THIS BOOK IS STUNNING TO SAY THE LEAST ,REAL ACCCOUNTS WRITTEN BY THOSE THAT FLEW.IT IS AN EXTRA ORDINARY ACCOUNT OF AIRCREWS AND HOW IT WAS FOR THEM HAVING TO DO WHAT WAS ASKED OF THEM WITH NO REAL END IN SIGHT.WE KNOW WHAT HAPPENED BUT THEY HAD NO IDEA AS TO HOW LONG THEY WOULD HAVE TO KEEP GOING DAY AFTER DAY AND GET ON WITH THE JOB ,& KEEP BASHING AWAY AT IT .
MY ADMIRATION IS HUGE OR THESE CREWS JUST CHECK OUT THEIR AGES IT BRINGS TEARS TO YOUR EYES

H A TRUSWELL
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on 18 March 2013
I found that the authors style did not suit me and found contents of this book very disappointing and feel there are better books on Bomber Command out there e.g. See author Jack Currie
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on 1 March 2014
I have read this book three times it is that good. It is part 2 of a trilogy chronicling the Bomber Command story, but this is the one with the knock out blow. The clue is in the full title. One need read no further than page three of the prelude to have to put the book down for a moment in order to recover and think about:

" The elite of the second world war generation had volunteered to fly and, in the attrition of 1944, found the likelihood of survival in the bomber war so slim they were no more substantial than men of air, ghosts already, waiting to vanish this night or the next."
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on 21 August 2014
A very well written and well researched account of life in bomber command, It highlights the enormous losses that bomber command suffered and the many mistakes and errors of judgement made which sometimes led to particularly devastating losses such as those suffered in the raid on the Nuremberg raid in which 100 aircraft were lost with over 500 aircrew.

It also highlights the many advances in Target Acquisition and great improvements in Radar and Jamming techniques, More than this though I think the stories of the aircrew are extremely thought provoking and I would recommend this book.
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