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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 26 October 2007
I may as well start by saying that I have a degree in Applied physics and I'm more exposed to this kind of thinking than the average reader. This book is more an excercise in deep thought than an enlightening read.
I can't imagine anyone not finding some of the ideas and imaginings in this book hard to grasp unless they have a technical science background and are used to thinking in this manner. His overall view of time I disagree with but that doesn't mean I regret reading it. In fact I found it to be a very thought provoking book which is always a good thing.
Because of the obscurity of the subject the author in no way really convinced me of his beliefs, since the arguments he puts forward are a mesh between his own eccentric thoughts about timelessness coupled with an underlying quantum mechanical structure to it. A process which would seem to be impossible to prove anyway. But still a eye-opening read.
I'm giving it 3 stars because of the difficulty of understanding some of the material he puts across which I don't recommend for someone looking for a nice and easy interesting science read, the book is hard to get through compared to most popular science books.
As a result of the awkward material presented I can't say that I found this book to be an exciting read either.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on 8 August 2001
Humans find it quite easy to grasp the idea of spacial dimensions. This might be because we have eyes, and skin that can feel things. If a clock was conscious, would it find space to be the elusive dimension? The author starts from the premise that time is inherently elusive, and he seeks to resolve this by eliminating it entirely. Inevitably, the notorious dual-slit light interference experiment features centrally in the book, as it does in Professor Deutsch's studies. Both of these quantum physicists are drawn to the multiple worlds (multiverse) theory, in which a virtually infinite number of universes exist simultaneously, 'touching' and affecting each other through the interaction of electromagnetic particles and probabilities. This theory is not accepted by the majority of physicists. Barbour's book is not an easy read; the early parts are far too long, and the conclusions - and the resultant implications - are not really clear at all. Having read the book, I certainly find it easier to imagine the universe existing as a timeless present moment, with no past and no future. Whether this book is on the right track, or merely leading its readers up the garden path, only the 'future' will reveal.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 12 March 2001
This book was difficult to get into the first time. An awful lot is packed in. The first chapters seem to explain the authors general idea, and the rest of the book explains how this fits into other physics theories. This was difficult to start with because you have to take some assumptions at face value until they are explained in full. Having said that, the diagrams are excellent, and the information is ultimately accessable. You may need to read it twice, but it is worth it.
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on 5 October 2011
This is a very interesting book but heavy on physics and mathematics for someone like me. If I had I known would not have bought it. Consequently I find it difficult to read past the first few chapters. :-(
Buy this if maths and physics are your thing.
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on 30 January 2013
A refreshingly different notion of existence. Quite thought provoking. Nothing else to say, I will just add a few more words to make the minimum needed for a review. OK that's done.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 18 April 2000
There are currently several books dealing with new theories in physics, they are fascinating but I found the "End of Time" a bit disappointing after all the newspaper hype. What I want in a book of this type are three things, firstly to be educated on the general theoretical background, entertainingly presented the history of the subject up to the present day, secondly the author must, as succinctly as possible, explain their theory; show where it supports and where it overturns conventional ideas. Finally the books must present conclusions, sketch out the likely impact of the new concept. The "End of Time" devotes many pages to arguments in favour of the author's thesis, in a way that will bore the general reader but is unlikely to convince the physicist. Near the end of the book my feeling was ok ok you win, just tell me the implications, but that's the problem, the author refuses to speculate, possibly on the spurious grounds that predictions are impossible in a world without time. In summary a long, confusing and eventually a frustrating read. If you want to see how a book of this type should be handled read the unbelievably good "The Inflationary Universe" by Alan H. Guth.
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on 14 May 2015
you know how sometimes you buy a book and you just can't get along with the authors style !

the best bit about this book its the time I threw it at the wall.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 3 November 2006
I am reading this a present so apologies for writing a review before completeing this but it was irresistable. As readers currently may know Hawking had worked on the idea that time and space had no actual beigining because of quantum uncertainty when the universe was smaller than plancks length - so that the question of a beginning was not relevant. However Einstein had already gone a 'quantum leap further by saying "the concept of past present and future are an illusion and a stubborn one at that.....". Perhaps he was ahead of the game.Hence I was very interested in this book. I am looking forward to completeing this book as much of our confusion about the nature of reality is based upon our failure to confront issues about the nature of time and a healthy open minded study of this beguiling human perception is welcomed.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 28 March 2001
The theme of the book is interesting. His theories of time gives even a non theoretical Physcist the potential to open their minds and excite themselves with wondering thoughts. Dispite this, the Author is so worshipping of his own theory of time he seems to get lost in a fantasy world of his own and gives to many childish metaphors in trying to make the theory imaginable.
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on 4 December 2014
This arrived in good time(fitting for the subject matter of the book) Thank you.
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