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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a real eye opener
A real eye opener and a fantastic read on how young people are so easily drawn into radicalism in our society. At times a very thought provoking and harrowing read yet a journey which is an inspiration. Such words of wisdom, tolerance and understanding.
Published 3 months ago by joanne hanson

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22 of 36 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A testament to Maajid's myopia, narcissism and fanaticism.
I knew Maajid as a petulant, arrogant 16 years old back in Southend-on-Sea. Even then he was regarded as the "hot headed" one as opposed to his more level minded elder brother, "Osman". Whilst myself, "Osman", his cousins and many others up and down the country managed to eventually see past HT's somewhat simplistic, dichotomous narrative and move on in a balanced,...
Published on 15 July 2012 by Casanova


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a real eye opener, 9 April 2014
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This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
A real eye opener and a fantastic read on how young people are so easily drawn into radicalism in our society. At times a very thought provoking and harrowing read yet a journey which is an inspiration. Such words of wisdom, tolerance and understanding.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars England!, 8 May 2014
This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
It doesn’t matter if you like the English Defence League, Al-Muhajiroun, Labour Conservative, Al-Qaeda or Communists, you can still read this VERY GOOD BOOK. It’s the story of a brave guy who set out as a young man to change the world, and in some ways succeeded. It’s the story of how British Pakistanis became Anglasised and the Angles became Pakistanisised. You can read it on a personal level or on a deeper level about Islam in the country that we all love: England!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ignore the fake reviews, 26 July 2014
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Mr. A. Wake "wakey03" (West Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
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Don't pay any attention to the number of fake reviews written about this item.

The topic is controversial in some communities and Mr Nawaz's stance has made him the enemy of people who fail to see reason and are blinded by their prejudices. They have taken to criticising a book which they have clearly not read because they wrongly believe that anything who offers a balanced critique of extremism is an attack on their religion.

This is a fantastic book that tells it how it is. A must read for all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!, 31 May 2014
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This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
An amazing book and an amazing story about an amazing guy. I was hooked from start to finish. The best book I have read in years.
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39 of 51 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Radical by Maajid Nawaz, 9 Aug 2012
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Wow... There are some axes being ground, grapes turning sour and chips balanced delicately on shoulders round here, aren't there? Anyone looking for a balanced, unbiased opinion about this book has to wade through an awful lot of hagiographies by friends and hatchet jobs by enemies before getting to anything subjective.

Yes, the writing in 'Radical' is wobbly in places - the prose can be a little purple, and the editor deserves a slap on the wrist (note: you wouldn't describe a dungeon as "cretinous") - but Nawaz isn't a professional writer, and the flaws, if anything, at least demonstrate the book wasn't overly ghostwritten. What we're hearing is Nawaz's voice, shaped into a gripping story by Tom Bromley. And it really is a gripping story. For all his self-aggrandizing bombast and flourishes of immodesty, Nawaz makes a likeable narrator and his story is an interesting one.

Other reviewers criticise him for placing himself at the centre of major events, but it's fairly clear by the end of the book that he often was if not at the centre then at least pretty bloody close to the centre of several key events in the recent history of UK Islamism. Like any memoir, the reader must bear in mind that this is the author's version of events, that it won't always be a balanced overview of his life and career, that somebody else present at each event might describe it differently; that goes with the territory. What Nawaz has given us isn't a definitive account of Hizb ut-Tahrir UK but one man's account of it. If those of us with no experience of that world wish to know more about it, accounts like this are invaluable; the more the better.

Of course, other critics - the particularly stupid, axe-grinding ones - will claim that Nawaz is simply a wolf in sheep's clothing, playing at the reformed radical while, I don't know... still plotting to overthrow the west? If they're particularly knuckle-headed they might even throw in some semi-researched reference to "taqqiya". If they do, just ignore them. Similarly, if their review begins "I know/knew Maajid Nawaz", ignore them. This is an entertaining, informative book, and a welcome follow on to Ed Husain's The Islamist.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Illuminating and Inspiring, 15 Jan 2014
By 
R. Iain F. Brown (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
I found this both illuminating and inspiring, illuminating because I began to understand why and how so many young Muslim men (and women) were being radicalised and what the Islamist goals are; inspiring because the human power to 'think ooutside the box' was so clearly demonstrated in Nawaz's intellectual journey into politically active moderation.

The writing is always easy to follow and the structure of the book is helpful.

The Quilliam Foundation which the author relates how he jointly founded seems to me a beacon of hope in a very dangerous world.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling Read, 8 Jan 2014
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J. McGeoch (Glasgow) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
A compelling and must read book and a great insight into islam and islamism, with everything going on the world at the moment i would recommend everyone read this book it is an education, it has changed my views on many things
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10 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Poacher to gamekeeper?, 3 Sep 2012
By 
G. J. Weeks (London) - See all my reviews
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I have never before read such polarised reviewing as this book has engendered on Amazon. Perhaps the author should be renamed Marmite Nawaz because reviewers seem to love or hate his book. He does come across as arrogant at times but he is a man of considerable achievements, first for an Islamist cause, Hizb al-Tahrir, then after his radical rejection of Islam, for the Quiliam Foundation and Khudi Pakistan. His work for HT lead to years of imprisonment in Egypt as a member of a banned organisation. His descriptions of interrogation and torture in Egyptian jails are horrific. But his years in jail led him away from Islamism as he learned that there has never been a unified Caliphate with one system of Islamic law. Via the campaign of Amnesty International on his behalf, he came to understand that human rights must be extended to all and one's opponents should not be demonised. He came to espouse a liberal, pluralist view of Islam which now infuriates his former HT friends and even family, so much so that he faces security risks. I am sure he is correct to assert that Islamism has spawned the English Defence League. Extremism begets extremism. His version of Islam is not that of a clash of civilisations. It would be a religion of peace. But in the diverse world of a many faceted religion, will such eirenic thinking triumph. One hopes so, but the reviews here do not make one optimistic.
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20 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I didn't know what to expect, 1 Aug 2012
I have known Maajid since his first interaction with HT in Southend. Whether you agree with his politics or not, for those of us who know him, know that he is passionate, committed and not one to lie. So when I came across this book, I wasn't sure what to expect. However, as one review states, this is about the book, not necessarily about the author.

I could not put the book down...that's a fact. I am not an academic (secular or Islamic) and used to be a radical Islamist myself and hence read the book both from a personal perspective (of knowing Maajid), but also from a political one. Maajid has managed to encapsulate his life so far in a way that is spellbinding, emotional and insightful. I'm not sure my mind would be intact if I had to endure what he has had to.

The essence of the book rings true for me and I am sure for many others who like me have gone through a period of life completely sure and convinced that everything in this World is wrong and can only be fixed in a singular manner as defined by a particular group of people.

The fact that the book manages to take the reader through the clearly defined arguments and rationale as to why a typical 'Essex boy' would willingly embrace the ideas of a radical group and turn against all that he knew to be true, certainly in my view, will help towards identifying the fundamental causes of fracture & conflict in modern British society. Too many people attribute 'radicalisation' of Muslim youth to ghettos and lack of integration, Maajid is able to demonstrate that this is certainly not always true. As for the dark period of incarceration, I am amazed at how Maajid, Reza & Ian (not forgetting all the other brothers mentioned in the book) managed to remain lucid and coherent - this MUST be a testament to their faith and for that may they be rewarded.

As I mentioned earlier, I did not read the book from an academic view point, and so I will not comment on the validity of the arguments that Maajid puts forward in the build up to his decision to leave HT, but I do support his idea that radicalising Muslim youth can and will lead to radicalising non Muslims towards right wing fascist ideas. Why? Because the vast majority of radicalised Muslims (not just the youth) are so hell bent on segregation from the indigenous British society, that the 'them and us' construct is built (with tremendous speed) on both sides. I can completely relate to Maajid's comments about how he 'shed' his non Muslim friends and found himself in a scenario with only those friends who are not only Muslim, but share his own ideas of how Islam should be defined. This is dangerous and I have not seen this in any other Muslim country (I have travelled extensively throughout the Middle East, Africa & the Indian Sub Continent) and from my limited knowledge of the early years of Islam, I don't believe the Prophet (SAWS)or his companions ever behaved in this way. Surely, if they had, Islam would have remained in the hands of a very few people.

On a final note, I have thoroughly enjoyed the book from cover to cover and like I said, whether you agree with Maajid's politics or not, the book is certainly a must read.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Radical' makes some powerful points. It becomes 'Unputdownable'., 9 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Radical: My Journey from Islamist Extremism to a Democratic Awakening (Paperback)
This book is a jouney for both the reader and the author. It makes you examine your own prejudices and experience of religion. It's inspiring. I loved it.
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