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63 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you read one book on the subject, read this one.
It was with great apathy that I began reading this book on the recommendation of a friend. In the past, I have suffered through the excitable jibberish of 'classics' such as Erich Von Daniken's 'Chariots of the Gods', in which he puts forward thought-provoking insights as 'irrefutable proof' of alien intervention. While his book contains many very interesting shards of...
Published on 24 Nov 2000 by shish@nutshell.net

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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Out of His Depth
I have made the mistake of buying his 'Atlantis and the Kingdom of the Neanderthals'.
That book is more or less a rehash of this book.
I gave away this book due to the fact that it is Scatter Brained, offering nothing substantial to a serious researcher, only something to while away the hours on a train.
Published on 24 Aug 2006 by M. Panos


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63 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you read one book on the subject, read this one., 24 Nov 2000
By 
shish@nutshell.net (Newcastle, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
It was with great apathy that I began reading this book on the recommendation of a friend. In the past, I have suffered through the excitable jibberish of 'classics' such as Erich Von Daniken's 'Chariots of the Gods', in which he puts forward thought-provoking insights as 'irrefutable proof' of alien intervention. While his book contains many very interesting shards of evidence which deserve further investigation, Daniken proves to be his own worst enemy by using the phrase 'irrefutable proof' more often than he uses punctuation... So you can perhaps understand my skepticism of such books. 'From Atlantis to the Shphinx' was a breath of fresh air. Once I started reading, I could not stop. Wilson begins with the premise that the erosion of the body of the Sphinx was caused by water, and not wind. How such a potentially staggering fact could have escaped the notice of Egyptologists is unclear, but any geologist will confirm this (I checked). Even by the Egyptologists admission, Egypt has been a barren land for many thousands of years before the time that the Sphinx is claimed to have been built by the Pharoah Cheops. This simple fact, easily proven or disproven, flies in the face of everything we thought we knew, not just about ancient Egypt, but about the timeline of human history. Wilson guides the reader through fact after stunning fact, and remains eminently readable through-out. I think what impressed me most was the fact that, unlike many other writers in this genre, he does not cheapen his work with wacky and over-zealous conclusions which enjoy only a tenuous link to the evidence at hand (Mr Von Daniken, I'm looking in your direction). This book is as far inland of the 'lunatic-fringe' of the genre as I have ever read, and I am now in the process of ordering many of the books he cites in his bibliography. If you are currently of the opinion that the ancient Egyptians built the Pyramids with slaves and pulleys, and that the 'Lost continent of Atlantis' is nothing more than a fanciful myth, then this book might (might) just change your mind.
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41 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rich in detail and thought-provoking, a masterful synthesis, 19 Mar 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
I read this book twice, once when it first came out and again more recently. The first time I read it I was familiar with some of the source material Wilson draws on. These parts of the book, at that time, were obviously not as engaging for me, nor, I suspect, will they be for others very familiar with the material. However, upon rereading it a couple years later I was again reminded of Wilson's masterful ability to draw together disparate sources of information to form a cohesive pattern. Of course, this involves speculation, but this type of inquiry always requires speculation, and Wilson manages to build a more cautious and convincing argument than many of his contemporaries. (That said, the reader must still be willing to be open-minded and entertain ideas that might not sit well, at least at first. If you have firmly made up your mind that, for example, there are no real mysteries surrounding the pyramids of Egypt or the sphinx and are unwilling to consider other opinions on the subject, then you probably won't be moved by much of this book.)
When drawing information from a variety of sources, it is likely that some of that information will later prove either incorrect or outdated. It is a testament to the cohesiveness of Wilson's argument that it does not rest on a single piece of evidence but is rather buttressed by a range of facts that each contributes to its strength. From reading some other reviews (here and elsewhere), I gather that often some of these "facts" don't sit well with all readers. This is reasonable (don't believe everything you read!); however, Wilson's style of thinking and researching make one less likely to discount his entire argument based on disagreement with parts of it. Furthermore, he is very adept at drawing his argument out over an entire book, reminding the reader along the way what the central themes are, before plunging back into the detailed information that forms the supports of his argument. What this results in is a stimulating, idea-filled journey that criss-crosses through numerous disciplines and over vast spans of time.
"From Atlantis to the Sphinx" in many ways forms a natural extension of Wilson's philosophy as expounded in his previous books. In this particular case, Wilson's ultimate aim - to demonstrate that ancient man had a different mode of thinking/perception/relationship to the natural world and the universe - is ultimately convincing for me because traces of this different mode still exist within us. If, by the time you're done with the book, you yourself aren't entirely convinced of this, I think you will still have found the journey worth the effort.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant exposé., 13 Oct 2000
By A Customer
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This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
This is an excellent summary of new theories and research by (among others) Schwaller de Lubicz, John West, Graham Hancock and Robert Bauval. A challenge to the more conventional, and superficial, current theories of Egyptology, neo- Darwinism and Archaeology. The book is valuable in its own right, and moreover it serves as an excellent introduction and gives references to further studies for the interested reader. Beside the works of the authors mentioned above, I would recommend the books of Dr Phillip E. Johnson on neo-Darwinism. On Egyptology, beside the references given in the book, I would recommend Elisabeth Haich: Initiation. All in all, a fascinating book, to be recommended for the open- minded reader.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gets the 'right' brain thinking, 26 Dec 2000
This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
An accumulation of lots of facts and theories about our forgotten, but still recoverable, ability to think free from the hassles of todays world. 6 quid, bargain.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fascinating Read, 14 April 2013
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This book is partly a culmination of hundreds of years of study, records and wisdom and partly the author's conclusions from this wealth of fascinating information. Once again I am appalled by how much evidence is systematically 'hidden' or at least ignored by academics, historians and scientists when it simply doesn't fit their picture of the world. This, amongst many other books, is an opportunity to make up our own minds about a subject which clearly affects us all - what truly is our history, and why is so much evidence and information denied. Who is afraid and why?
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a challenge to traditional history, 20 Oct 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
I have just finished this book, having only discovered by accident. (I borrowed the copy I read so I intend purchasing my own copy now.) It will make you ponder many traditional assumptions about our history. I thought it well prepared, although I got lost when wilson would jump from topic to topic. However it does tie up in the end. I also was glad for the evaluations of all other comtemporary works, as now I know what I will read next. There is a good bibliography of comparitive works which also ask us to think about what our origins are and how important they may or may not be to us as a society and as individuals. It is a worthwhile read & is captivating for the novice anthropologist & sociologist.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Atlantis?, 9 May 2009
By 
Aj "Aaron" (Basingstoke, U.K) - See all my reviews
Great book, I first though this book was going to be a heavy worded academic piece but after the first page i realised it was written in a understandable and easy way! Shows great evidence that civilisation is a lot older than we think and maybe this civilisastion was the lost continent of atlantis! Worth reading if your intrested in atlantis or ancient civilisation!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting!, 16 Aug 2012
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Diane (Gloucester England) - See all my reviews
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A very interesting view on the world from ancient to now... and well worth reading.
Well researched and easy to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great study!, 28 Oct 2011
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Faux Creations "Martin Riding" (Radford, VA, USA) - See all my reviews
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Enjoyed reading the book and understanding his theories. He obviously knows his subject very well! I believe that you will also enjoy it!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars From Atlantis to the Sphinx, 3 Jun 2012
By 
Koriel Tannhauser (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: From Atlantis to the Sphinx: Recovering the Lost Wisdom of the Ancient World (Paperback)
There is no question that the author was influenced by the work of John Anthony West, Graham Hancock, Robert Bauval, Rand Flem-Ath, Robert Schoch, Charles Hapgood, Arthur Posnansky, Giorgio Santillana and Hertha Von Dechend, Alexander Thom, George Gurdjieff or even Schwaller de Lubicz. The book was first published in 1996 and if you are very familiar with the work of above mentioned authors (and also with the "The Atlantis Blueprint" which the author wrote together with Rand Flem-Ath and which was published in 2000), you can probably skip this book. I'm not saying here that the book is not interesting or bad (on the contrary) but in some cases there is no point of reading all that information again.

Starting from the detailed research related to the "Sphinx" the author argues that an advanced civilisation (or civilisations) existed in traditionally pre-historic times (in particular the Atlantean civilization). Sounds familiar? It is. But if you are new to this subject, this book offers a great "introduction" material to the above theory as it is discussing theories related to: Sphinx & Giza Pyramid complex and its relation to the Orion's Belt, ancient maps (usual suspect here: Oronteus Finaeus, Piri Reis and others - you can clearly see that the author is using Hancock's notes - of course with the Hancock's permission), Earth's shifting crust theory, Atlantis and Antarctica connection, Bimini Road, Aztecs, Palenque, Tiahuanaco, Nazca lines, "forbidden archaeology" and even Coral Castle (and Ed Leedskalnin).

Bear in mind that some of the conclusions are a bit questionable. For example in one of the chapters he is asking: if those ancient people were so skilled in geometry, how do they remember it all (since no stone or clay tablets inscribed with geometrical proposition have come to us from megalithic builders)? He is suggesting that they simply memorised that material. Possible? Yes, it is "possible", but even though the author is giving you reasons for that (based mostly on Frances Yate's book "The art of memory") , I would expect a little bit more here (a few additional different explanation/theories could be useful, not just one explanation that they memorised everything related to geometry -> it's too easy "way out" for me).

On the other hand his description of "Hamlet's Mill" by Giorgio Santillana and Hertha Von Dechend is correct: "one of the most puzzling and frustrating books even written on the problem of astronomy and ancient man". This actually did make me smile. Not sure about puzzling, but definitely it is "frustrating", as this is not a simple book to read, at least for me. Side note: the book is basically saying that at some point in the past the science integrated into different myths (from different cultures on different continents), that most of them are expressions of the same story and that all myths have one common origin in the celestial cosmology (and this knowledge is still decoded there - such as precession of equinoxes).

Even though it may seem like a slightly negative review - it is not. It is obvious that the author has done a great research and put a lot of various theories into one, easy to read book that also has 10 chapters, good Bibliography and Notes sections. The only other issue I have with the book is that it doesn't have a lot of photos or drawings (in fact I don't think that there are any drawings or charts at all), which is a shame, since a lot of material in the book could use some of those (not sure if I can take one star from that as I'm very familiar with that material anyway, but "new readers" please be aware of that fact). In over all, a good reading material if you are new to the subject, and slightly less engrossing if you are very familiar with it (but that's not the "book's fault", since it was published 15 years ago, and simply there is a lot of better books on the market now).
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