Customer Reviews

21
3.9 out of 5 stars
Maths: A Book You Can Count On
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£6.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
I have an 11-year-old daughter and 9-year-old son and hoped this book would be a useful reference for them, as it explains the basic concepts of Maths in a fun way. The back of the book states it is aimed at Key Stages 2 & 3, so is perfect for my kids and they have both picked it up at various times.

It covers a range of mathematical topics: starting with the basics, such as numbers and units what they actually mean; covering sums, multiplication and x values; then onto shapes and solids, including pi and finally covering the meaning and use of data, such as graphs and charts.

A very useful reference then, I can see my children using this often, as it covers these concepts in a fun, easy-to-understand way and features some characters to help this along, together with some historical facts and figures. Highly recommended!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have two children presently at Key stage 3 at school and one at Key Stage 2 in fact my eldest is in her final year and studying for those all important GCSE's.

All of my children thought this book was brilliant. It makes fun learning, it enforces what they have learnt, its easy to use and understand, excellent for quick reference and whats more has a poster which my thirteen year old and eight year has on their wall in case they need it when doing homework.

I endorse anything which helps children through education and does it so they can understand, makes it fun and it works as a reference aid. Maths doesnt change or so you would think the correct answer is after all the correst answer. Teaching math has changed an awful lot since I went to school and I find sometimes even the wording of the question throws me before I get chance to help them more often than not.

The amount of times they have asked me a question that sounds like a foreign language until I take a look then I show them the way to answer it and they tell me they dont do it like that and I have to do it like this. This book takes some of the mystery away for aldults as well

Its a great little reference book packed with the necessary information your kids need to give them a helping hand.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 21 October 2010
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I am pretty good at maths - I'm an accountant - but I struggle to explain the concepts to others. This book does a great job. Although mainly of benefit to secondary school children (and upwards), it also contains some concepts which will be helpful to primary children (age 10 up I'd say). Each mathematical term is well explained and understandable. The pictures and the text are sometimes a bit gimmicky, but I think the book makes a great contribution to explaining mathematical terms to the numerically challenged. It's not quite as good at the book on Punctuation in the series (I haven't seen the other books in this series), but it is still very useful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 25 September 2010
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book is part of a new series of books which aim to take traditionally "hostile" subjects such as maths and make them "cool" and accessible. The concept is brave, admirable and ambitious. Each double page sets out to introduce and explain a concept in about 200 words - quite a challenge! We're not talking about simple addition and subtraction, but "real" maths like Pi and algebra that would appeal to age 9+

The text is on the left hand side and there is a bright colourful drawing on the right hand side. The drawings are simple and greatly help to illustrate the concept being discussed on the opposing page. The text is very well written in a punchy style that reads more like 9 years+ comic fiction rather than a maths textbook, but it still manages to get across to a child a good, basic understanding of concepts that many adults don't understand, or if they do understand, would be very hard pressed to explain so succintly.

Each mathematical concept is introduced as a "first person character" that the reader can visualise. So you'll get something like "I'm Pi and I'm so amazing and wonderful... etc". At first this might seem a little patronising or condescending, or trying too hard to appeal to kids, but ultimately this approach did actually work with my 9 year old son, so the proof, as they say, was in the pudding. My son has enjoyed reading this book, and it has opened his eyes to a whole range of mathematical ideas, and has put into clearer focus other things that he learned at school.

However, I have to be strict with this book and mark it down to 4 stars because the book lacks the depth of examples that we all know are necessary to ingrain maths concepts into a human brain. It is slightly frustrating to have such a fantastic introduction to maths, and yet little depth beyond that. Ideally this book should be followed by a much bigger book written in an equally punchy and accessible style but taking each of the concepts to a greater depth and giving more examples of calculations using the concepts. I very much hope that this series is expanded along those lines.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 24 October 2010
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Kingfisher/2010 : Created by Basher : Written by Dan Green

From the back cover:

'Meet Zero, a bubbly chap who will dissolve you to nothing; all-action Units, who just love to measure; greedy-guts Multiply, a big guy who hoards numbers together; and mysterious Pi, who goes on and on and on......to Infinity!
Multiply your number know-how with Basher's unique one-stop guide to the building blocks of mathematics. Packed with top tips and memorable characters, this is an essential book for every budding mathematician.'

Measuring in at c 17.5 cm square, this is the same size as the recently published Punctuation - The Write Stuff.

Maths - A book you can count on! has a colourful paperback cover which opens to 64 numbered, shiny pages, split into 4 pastel themed chapters:

* Chapter 1 - Number Bunch (pg 4-15) (Peach-coloured)
Zero, Infinity, Minus Numbers, Fraction, Decimal Fractions & Units

* Chapter 2 - Special Sum-Things (pg 16-27) (Aqua-coloured)
Add, Subtract, Multiply, Divide, X(Special Sum-Things)

* Chapter 3 - Shape-Shifters (pg 28-49) (Lilac-coloured)
Line, Angle, Circle, Pi, Triangle, Quadrilaterals, Polygon, 3D Shapes, Area, Volume

* Chapter 4 - Data Gang (pg 50-59) (Pale Pink-coloured)
Average, Ratio, Per Cent, Bar Chart, Pie Chart, Line Graph

plus a 2-page index & a useful 3-page glossary......completed with a fold-away MATHS poster, attached to the back inner cover.

Each chapter has an opening double-page spread with the introduction on the left-hand page and the 'characters', i.e. the following 'topics', on the right.
Each topic follows the same format, a 1 or 2-page spread giving key information in three bullet points at the top and any additional key information at the bottom, with general description in between. The 'character' is an easy to spot colour illustration. A mini-pic is also included for quick reference to the character, and the place in the chapter/book.
All the 'characters' have a capital letter when they appear in the general text, e.g. 'Multiply', so are easy to spot and look up in the index, if more information is required and any relevant mathematical symbols are pictured, too.

At the bottom of the page is a coloured box containing supplementary information or a fact or two, and alongside most have three bullet points containing relevant key information. In the 'Sum-Things' chapter, this area is used for 'head puzzles', providing a simple example with method and solution.

The poster at the back of the book is a colourful bonus set out in abacus fashion, but has limited value.
The text throughout the book is generally light-hearted; perhaps a little complex in places, grammatically contracted in others and sometimes inconsistent e.g. numbers in numerical form in places but in words in others.

Example of text - From Chapter 4 - 'Average', part of Data Gang (pages 52/53):

'There's nothing ordinary about this Average Joe
Its special skills are finding mid points among numbers
Has three forms: the mode, the median and the mean

It's Captain Average to you. My name may be Average, but there is nothing "bog standard" or "plain vanilla" about me. Yes, I drive down the middle of the road so no one can overtake me. But that's my job - working out the exact midway point among a set of two or more numbers.

Take my "mean" trick. Your Aunt Mary - every time you visit her, she gives you a bag of sweets, bless her! Last time, the bag had 19 sweets in it. The time before it had 16 sweets, and the time before that seven. What's the Average (or mean) number of sweets she's given you per visit? Add up the total number of sweets: 19 + 16 +7 = 42.
Divide your total by the number of visits: 42 ÷ 3 = 14. Over three visits, she's given you and Average of 14 sweets per visit. Not bad, really. She's not mean!'

The page finishes with a note about the Greek letter ' (mu) which is sometimes used for 'the mean', along with the three bullet points:

* Mean: AVERAGE of a set of numbers
* Mode: MOST common number in a set
* Median: the MIDDLE value in a set

From 'Triangle' - one of the Shape-Shifters (page 38):

'....."Tri" pushing me around, big fella, and I'll knock you into a three-cornered hat. I'm rigid! Three means strength, and you'll need a sledgehammer to shift my shape. I do have different forms, though. Come meet them!
Prettiest first!
Meet the equilaterals - all three sides the same length, with three dainty 60° Angles.
Next, the isosceles - two sides the same, two equal Angles. Uh oh!
Here come the scalenes - no sides or Angles the same.
Last, the right-Angled Triangles, with one 90° corner. These dudes hook up with a famous rule, Pythagoras' Theorem.
"The squaw on the hippopotamus equals the sum of the squaws on the other two hides".....
Just kidding!
"The square of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the squares of the other two sides."

All things considered, a useful book which tries hard to push a lighter side to understanding Maths, and inject a bit of humour, but may need some perseverance (in my opinion)!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book is shaped to fit child-sized hands, with bright, colourful graphics resembling Manga characters. These are often on the right hand side of the page with explanations on the left hand side. However, some of the language used to explain mathematical concepts may puzzle children.

For example, there's a reference to the Pythagoras 'sons of the squaw on the hippopotamus' joke. The joke is completely inappropriate to this age range and it can only serve to confuse when presented in this context. What was wrong with breaking Pythagoras down into the 3:4:5 squared representation that usually serves as an introduction?

However, there is some good teaching in there - volume is introduced as an extension of the concept of area in a practical way that children can relate to.

I'm not sure about the full page drawings of characters such as Volume, the rock chick. Personalising the ideas in this way doesn't simplify anything, but only introduces irrelevance.

Parents may find themselves taking a sneak peek at the Glossary to clarify their own understanding and this is probably the most useful part of the book.

Any book that engages children with mathematics is worthwhile and this is worth trying for that alone, in that it is visually appealing, but use with caution and check your own understanding. You may find yourself having to offer additional explanations to children and wishing you hadn't started ....
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
My son is just 7 years old so I read this book to him. I read each section at a time. He loves it and the picture are of the style that he tries to copy.

The book is split into sections shown below with each topic having two pages of simple explanation with one or two large bright colourful pictures.

****Number bunch - Zero, infinity, minus numbers, fractions, decimal fractions and units.

****Special sums-things,
Add, subtract, multiply, divide, X

****Shape shifters,
Line, angle, circle, pi, triangle, quadrilaterals, polygon, 3d shapes, area, volume

****Data gang,
Average, ratio, per cent, bar chart, pie chart, line graph

I use this book to offer my son a brief introduction into the concepts so that when it is done at school he know more about it and can be more confident.

Index and Glossary.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A word of warning about these books - the style takes some getting used to. I had the Planet Earth one and hated it at first, then thought I'd give the Periodic Table one a go and loved the approach and informality and my 8 year old son finds them very interesting. The maths book follows the same route, giving an introduction to maths concepts in a light hearted way but giving readers good knowledge and understanding.

I would say this is more a reference than a training book, but very fun indeed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 7 December 2010
Format: PaperbackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I first bought the punctuation book from this series for my younger brother. I was so impressed that ive since started purchasing all the other titles in the series to help him with his studies. He loves them and so do i. They make learning fun and even though the information is fairly indepth it is portrayed in a way that makes it fun interesting and involving. and for you adults that just think you know maths this book will show you how little you remember from your school days!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 11 June 2014
Arrived quickly, good condition, great price. I was pleased to see that the poster that comes with the Basher books was still in it - now on my son's wall. Buying this second hand was a great way to add to my son's growing collection of this series without having to spend too much.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Basher Science: Physics: Why Matter Matters
Basher Science: Physics: Why Matter Matters by Dan Green (Paperback - 3 Mar. 2008)

Basher Science: Chemistry
Basher Science: Chemistry by Dan Green (Paperback - 5 Jun. 2014)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.