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57 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't recommend this book highly enough!
I enjoyed Ms.Mosse's first book,Labrynth,and I checked the Amazon reviews of this current book,Sepulchre,for an indication of what to expect of it..the reviews did not do justice to the book,and I had delayed purchasing it because of them.I am now half way through the book,having stayed awake into the early hours of last night,anxious to find out what happened next..It is...
Published on 3 Nov. 2010 by fluffy wiccan

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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Halfway I thought "4 star", then things started to slide...
Kate Mosse writes in an evocative, well researched style. I liked the twin time threads in Labyrinth, and this approach seemed promising in Sepulchre. Apart from the irritating American English used throughout the prose by this English author, the first two hundred pages kept me engrossed in the developing plot, albeit Tarot Cards being yet another twist on Da Vinci Code,...
Published on 17 Jan. 2008 by Michael J. Law


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57 of 58 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't recommend this book highly enough!, 3 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Sepulchre (Paperback)
I enjoyed Ms.Mosse's first book,Labrynth,and I checked the Amazon reviews of this current book,Sepulchre,for an indication of what to expect of it..the reviews did not do justice to the book,and I had delayed purchasing it because of them.I am now half way through the book,having stayed awake into the early hours of last night,anxious to find out what happened next..It is honestly the best book I have read,in a long time,and even the minor criticisms by other readers,such as the 'Americanisms',did not detract in any way-in fact I could not detect them at all,I found all dialogue wonderful and the descriptions very evocative but not at all flowery,or over the top.It has by turns ellicited feelings of awe,shivers,smiles,intrigue and excitement,mingled with dread-the characters are very likeable and well written,too,although Isobel has a faint,ethereal quality and ,despite plaing a central role,there is a sense of her beng in the background or on the edge of the story,but this is in keeping with her character.It was lovely to see a character I was fond of in Labrynth,re emerge as an enigmatic character in this story-quite heartwarming,although I'm still looking forward to learning what his role wil be.The theme of the Tarot was excellently devised,original and executed brilliantly,I now look at the tarot in a new light,having had little interest before.
Very much recommended-and I hope Ms.Mosse will continue to write more like it!
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thorougly absorbing, 24 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Sepulchre (Paperback)
I read this book last year and was checking out reviews for another book by the same author when I was intrigued to read other peoples reviews about this one.
I guess if nothing else it has proved to me that we should not be to swayed by other peoples views - I found this book fascinating, spellbinding and though written in depth to make the characters and scenery so real I found it a real page turner.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Halfway I thought "4 star", then things started to slide..., 17 Jan. 2008
By 
Michael J. Law "eurolease" (Teulada Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
Kate Mosse writes in an evocative, well researched style. I liked the twin time threads in Labyrinth, and this approach seemed promising in Sepulchre. Apart from the irritating American English used throughout the prose by this English author, the first two hundred pages kept me engrossed in the developing plot, albeit Tarot Cards being yet another twist on Da Vinci Code, The Eight etc.. I hate to be critical of an author whom I could not hope to emulate, but something went awry in the middle. Tension gave way to melodrama,almost as if Kate was rushing and couldn't wind it up on a high note. Sorry but it has to be an "also ran" read, taken as a whole.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not recommended, 16 July 2008
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
I enjoyed Labyrinthe for its gripping story and looked forward to reading this one. It was disappointing and actually became a chore to finish. The writing is not crisp and the result is too long; it needed a good editor. Whoever proofread the final version also did a sloppy job.

Mosse has used the technique of duel time periods successfully before, but this time I don't think it worked. The introduction of American English for Meredith's appearance grated and was unnecessary. The characters were not particularly well drawn and suffered from being two dimensional. I found I did not care what happened to any of them.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The palaver is finished!, 6 Jan. 2008
By 
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
Sepulchre was my nightly companion through an unwelcome episode of flu so the book's characters and descriptive narrative were somewhat magnified through vivid and feverish hallucinations. This was probably just as well as, in the cold light of day, the characterisation is weak and two-dimensional.

One feels an indifference to the fates of the various protagonists, especially the heroine Leonie. Mosse has hundreds of pages to develop the girl's personality beyond that of a petulant, impressionable and naive schoolgirl, yet fails. The evil psychopathic Constant is completely one dimensional. The modern day all American heroine, Meredith, lacks real substance which is disappointing given the musical possibilities and links to Debussy that Mosse fails to realise fully. The introduction of the Labyrinth characters Audric Baillard and Shelagh O'Donnell into the narrative, is strangely disjointing. The infanticide theme is a little overly gratuitous turning some of the concluding sequences into grotesque gothic melodrama. The Tarot theme, although original and captivating in the early part of the story, fails to develop or make sense at the conclusion, leading to a weak and unsatisfactory finish.

Throughout her novels Mosse spouts occasional lines from T.S.Eliot. ("Shape without form/ shade without colour/ hidden voices in the orchard", etc). Well, here's my contribution...

"The palaver is finished!"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not LABYRINTH but not all bad., 29 Aug. 2008
This review is from: Sepulchre (Paperback)
I very much wanted to like this book and am incredibly disappointed that I found it such a chore to finish. I loved Labyrinth but in my opinion this book pales in comparison and Ms Mosse missed an opportunity as the story is really quite good, full of mysticism, spirits, tarot etc. It is a very well researched novel full of historical information which I always find fascinating. The main problem is the 'rushed' feel even though it is an epic length book, and I agree with other reviewers that if pressure was put on Ms Mosse because of deadlines then her publishers have ruined what could have been a truly excellent book through shoddy editing etc.

It started off quite well with Leonie Vernier (the heroine of the historical section) being stood up by her brother at the Opera and the fall-out which ensued. I enjoyed the way in which the fictional character was woven into and witnessed historical events and thought that this section of the book was exciting and promised better to come. Unfortunately it didn't always deliver. In my case, I believe that the modern section of the book let the whole novel down. It wasn't nearly as compelling as the 1891 story and it lacked lustre in comparison. The main problems being quite a dull heroine called Meredith and the continual use of Americanisms (already outlined in previous reviews) which I found very off-putting and bit irritating. As a consequence I believe that the 1891 story is better all-round. This story actually had teeth and in parts was quite gripping especially the climax of the Anatole/Constant saga which, frustratingly, highlighted just how good this novel could have been. It was all the more disappointing when it then slipped back into what can only be described as 'plodding'.

I think 3 stars if fair for this book. I will still be eagerly looking out for the next Kate Mosse book. I'm sure that the next will be back up to Labyrinth standards and in the meantime, we can buy paperbacks so cheaply now in the UK that it's well worth picking up and seeing what you think for yourself.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This book is like a game with only one half., 19 Nov. 2011
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
I started reading the book with much interest. Historical novels interest me greatly. well written, going in depth into some of the major characters: it seemed money well spent. But after page 400 (of 593) it seems that the author wants to finish it off. Conclude the story, without having had a clear idea at the beginning of how all of the story would run. So the story becomes inconsistent, spirits fill in gaps that the characters cannot fill in. The second half is missing, put together without thinking, and after all it's a pity to have spent so much time reading it. Many times long is not equal to beautiful, when it concerns stories.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I would have given it four, but..., 18 Nov. 2007
By 
S. Caughie "scaughie" (USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
Having just finished this book, I wanted to see what others made of it. And what I've found here - good and bad - is more or less accurate. Hence my three stars. To explain:

In response to the single-star reviewers, honestly, given 'Labyrinth', did you really approach this book expecting erudite literature? Or even anything remotely insightful? I think (I hope!) it's meant only to be fun and suspenseful, which it is, in spades. In fact, it was a damned entertaining read.

But in warning to those inclined to take on board the five-star ratings (particularly if, like me, you're American), be warned! As others have said, the 'Americanese' is both pervasive and intensely annoying - and, I'd add, unnecessary. It's clear Meredith is American. We don't need to be bludgeoned with the vernacular every other word. But worse still, this vernacular isn't even accurate. Meredith, despite her annoying ability to live on wine, steaks and pastry and retain flat abs, is a nearly-thirty-year-old former child violin prodigy with a PhD in English - yet she employs the vocabulary of a nineteen-year-old frat-boy. I have to think she'd be capable of descriptions slightly more enlightening than 'the compartment was pretty empty' or 'the concert was seriously dull'.

And I'm not just being snippy for the sake of it: the painful deliberateness with which this crappy attempt at a colloquial narrative was foisted on a major, point-of-view character was grating to the point that I almost couldn't read it, despite being hooked by the story. If, as other readers have suggested, this was an attempt to appease an American audience, I think Ms. Mosse has rather misjudged us. But then again, maybe her American audience is made up of of nineteen-year-old frat boys, in which case, all power to her.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad read ,but not brilliant either, 2 April 2008
By 
Miss Rnm Hudson "R Hudson" (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
i found the beggining of the book very engaging ,however towards the end it got a little drawn out for a plot that became obvious to the outcome.I expected something different to her previous novel and became dissapointed when it was basically the same outcome and book with different characters and eara.
Saying that it would make a good novel to read inbetween your next more serios read when you want to wind down.
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175 of 205 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Awkward, clumsy fiction, 2 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Sepulchre (Hardcover)
Like the other person here who wrote a bad review of Sepulchre, I have no wish to be vindictive to the author. Writing must be a little like baring your soul and to have it flayed alive must be hard for the author. Justified or not, there are some bitter (as well as some incredibly saccharine) reviews here.

However, though I've never written a review on Amazon before, I felt driven to in this instance. The time-slip novel is my favourite of all genres. Sadly, though I sat down for a rip-roaring read, I did not like this book at all. If you like the time-slip genre there so many better authors. It started ok enough, with atmosphere and setting up of characters, but then it went badly wrong.

The plot is convenient and contrived, the present-day American heroine is phoney (I'm a US citizen) and unnecessarily forced, the phrases are clichéd, the characters all seem cookie-cutter types, each with their own specific role to play without depth, shade, or subtly. The prose has some flair of the commercial writer, but is mainly obtuse and clumsy. Towards the end, the book badly fails and the finale hardly worth all that padding.

Kate Mosse obviously worked hard on the research for this novel - and the text at those points are tedious, overlong and actually quite boring. I do wonder though whether the author might concentrate her skills elsewhere. Still, she might as well cash in while she can until such a time as her publisher thinks she's no longer going to shift books. It does seem a little unfair to abuse us readers, the valuable ever dwindling pool of honest book buyers, into spending our money on such awkward fiction.

My recommendation is if you want a good time-slip novel, try other novelists.
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Sepulchre
Sepulchre by Kate Mosse (Paperback - 15 May 2008)
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