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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect... but two golds out of three isn't bad!
The first thing to say is I enjoyed this book a lot - I mean it was the one I keep picking up in preference to any of the others in the stack! Is this because I am a bike-nut? Well, I will try to be objective...

Mr. Wiggins gives a brave and honest account of his life - in particular he gives a frank account of his relationship with his father who walked out...
Published on 28 Jan 2009 by stevieby

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK but Wiggins deserves more.
With Wiggins the favourite for the yellow jersey this year - and not knowing that much about him - I decided to buy this.
He's a fascinating, complex character and the book touches on some of his traits - the problems with his father, the post-Olympic, beer-fuelled comedown. There's an honesty, which is refreshing and for the most part I enjoyed it.
But the book...
Published on 10 July 2012 by MR JINKS


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect... but two golds out of three isn't bad!, 28 Jan 2009
The first thing to say is I enjoyed this book a lot - I mean it was the one I keep picking up in preference to any of the others in the stack! Is this because I am a bike-nut? Well, I will try to be objective...

Mr. Wiggins gives a brave and honest account of his life - in particular he gives a frank account of his relationship with his father who walked out and lost all contact when Bradley was a mere three years old, an act the 'father' had performed with a former wife and child and would repeat a third time. This same father, a tough Aussie, did leave his mark though - as a cycling legend there is no doubting where Brad got his inspiration and perhaps his talent also. Certainly a mixed blessing - even the 'suspicious' death of Gary Wiggins adds weight to his son's emotional burden.

Brad is also open about his prolonged bout of drinking following his gold medal win in Athens. So certainly a life with bumps. To balance all the negative aspects he can credit the English half of his family for their support and the affection he shares with his own wife and kids.

And all of this is important as it becomes clear - at the top of sporting achievement mental strength and well-being are as important as their physical counterparts.

There are a few insights into the complex world of cycling (Bradley is involved in both road and track racing) and the magical set-up of Team UK. A little too much of race schedules - which won't mean much to anyone not present. And a little too much of thanking people - touching, but reads like an extended acceptance speech!

Cycling is not, thankfully, a dull sport! The book is saved by capturing sufficient of the build-up and the actual race tension.

Of course the question I wanted an answer to was why the two gold medals from Beijing was not three? That may seem mean, but Wiggins was chosen for three events with good reason, in fact it would have been unreasonable had he not been selected for all three, and all expectations were for three golds. But equally, in the circumstances, is it reasonable to expect one individual to produce world-beating times day after day after day? And if the Olympics want to show the best athletes can produce, is this the way to organize things? In any case, Wiggins is certainly entitled to his defense - if ever winning only two gold medals needs one!

I wanted to know the character of Bradley Wiggins better and this book, despite its limitations, obliged. His reputation may not glitter like some, but as a working-class boy who never claims to be more than an average bloke he has achieved one hell of a lot, and I will keep on applauding him for that.

Some of the photos are pretty cool too!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK but Wiggins deserves more., 10 July 2012
With Wiggins the favourite for the yellow jersey this year - and not knowing that much about him - I decided to buy this.
He's a fascinating, complex character and the book touches on some of his traits - the problems with his father, the post-Olympic, beer-fuelled comedown. There's an honesty, which is refreshing and for the most part I enjoyed it.
But the book is patchy, with not that much effort or planning put into it - in marked contrast to the reality of a pro cyclist's life.I suppose you are at the mercy of the ghost.
An ordinary man with extraordinary gifts (and sideburns), Wiggins is undeniably a sporting great; if he wins the Tour this year, let's hope we see a book that matches his achievements.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A bit of a let down, 4 Jan 2011
This review is from: In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography (Paperback)
First off, Brad's achievements are extraordinary. No doubt. Hat's off to all he has (and will continue to) achieve.

What's disappointing is how well those achievements are conveyed in this book which, to my mind, is just an uninspiring factual account of Brad's races. It reads more like a wikipedia chronology page than anything more immersive.

The problem is a lack of depth - there is very little time given over to understanding his character, his opinions, his feelings, his regimes, his aspirations. You finish not really thinking you know more about the real un-retouched Bradley Wiggins.

And what's really disappointing (and inexcusable) is the number of mistakes in the book - not obvious ones like forgetting to mention a gold medal or two - but typographical ones. How many times can you read Time Trail without wanting to throw the book at the wall (for the benefit of the publisher, it's Time Trial).
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good Insight, 29 Oct 2008
By 
Howard Betts (Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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Ghosted biographies of incomplete sports careers can be disappointing but I was tempted into buying this after reading an article about Bradley in the Sunday Times. Whilst Bradley is not keen to explore his childhood in any great depth he does open some doors on his inner life and in particular the issues surrounding his non relationship with his father who left him very early in his life to be raised by his mother, his grandparents and a step father. It is what Bradly doesn't give away to his ghost writer that is the most interesting from a psychological perspective. Taking to drink following his success in winning the gold at Athens is fascinating as is his refocusing upon a new career on the raod before coming back into the high performance culture of Team GB again as he builds towards his further successes in Beijing. Perhaps Bradley will further expand upon his life more fully after he competes at London in 2012 in which we will all hope he has further successes as by medal count he is already a highly successful Olympian. Not a five-star read but I was not disapponted. This is an insight into a champion who has wrestled with his personality and a number of psycholgical issues.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rushed book doesn't do justice to the subject, 22 Jun 2010
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This review is from: In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography (Paperback)
Bradley Wiggins is a great rider and an interesting character. This barely proof-read book, with its grammatical, spelling and factual mistakes, does not do him justice, and smacks of being churned out in (too) short order to turn a quick buck following his performance in the 2009 TDF. Regardless of Wiggins' relative merits as a subject compared to (say) Chris Hoy or Mark Cavendish, this book is far less readable than either 'Boy Racer' or 'Heroes, Villains and Velodromes'. Once you've read them there are still about 2 dozen books I'd recommend in preference to this.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Sloppy book lets down Wiggins, 6 Mar 2011
This review is from: In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography (Paperback)
I doubt anyone can read this and think it's a good book however much they might think - as I do - that Wiggins is a good bloke. It's interesting enough but for much of the time it does read like a laundry list of races and medals - "then the next day I travelled to Nowhereville and competed in the World Mile Solo Pursuit Chase Madison and was disappointed to come fourth with a time of 4.13 and after just a few hours sleep I was off to Someothertown to take part in the ...."

However, it's difficult to know whether this is more boring than him going on and on and on about how utterly useless his father was and how this has affected him in adult life. Interesting for him, perhaps, but somewhat less so than for the average reader, I would imagine. One has an idea that the book might not be especially well written or inspirational just from the chapter titles: "Boy Racer"; "Early Success"; "Heading for Sydney" and so on. It smacks of a lazy and hastily put-together cash-in.

And if you don't know much about cycling, then be prepared to be baffled by this book because everything is taken for granted and nothing explained.

In one sense it is a measure of the man's achievements that even the mighty Tour de France, the completion of which requires physical endurance beyond the imagination, let alone capability, of almost all men, is little more than a footnote in this book, as we whizz from starting prologue to end 23 days later in just a few pages. One gains no sense of what it must really be like to actually take part, let alone complete, the Tour.

As others have said there are a lot of errors in the book but one which made me laugh out loud was at what should be the pinnacle of the book and the man's achievements to date, the infamous team pursuit gold medal at the Beijing Olympics. This, quite rightly, gets a very big build up and he tells us that he felt it was the most perfect race he has ever participated in. Wonderful stuff but rather let down by his apparent claim that the GB team had "from a standing start, averaged 61.719mph for the entire race". Brad's a fast lad but not that fast!

Did no one proof read this? And if they did and even if they know nothing about cycling, might they not have spotted that 62mph in any bike race is rather unlikely?
It just looks lazy and sloppy, the exact antithesis of Bradley Wiggins.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bradley Wiggins, 22 April 2013
By 
G. Cobb (St Albans England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography (Paperback)
My son absolutely loved this book and was very excited with it and actually read it all in one day!!
Thanks for quick delivery and reasonable price and quality.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, 23 Jan 2013
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Great stroy of achievement despite life knocks. Inspiration for anyone, and also a lesson in the pitfalls that can get you along the way
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I bet Brad would not win 2012 tdf based on this book …, 25 Dec 2012
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… silly me! Not because I didn't want him to win but because well he didn't seem serious and dedicated enough.

Like all these books I am desperste for more nitty grity
athletical details : what does he eat, how does he train, what does he wear when it's really wet or does he turbo train then and if so is it one that's wired to the web so he can follow stage routes and what is the circumference of his thighs and how many hours can he ride before his neck aches and and and etc. Basically what can I learn and apply? I think mega athletes should produce two cuts of their biographies, one like this that my Mom might read and enjoy and one for nosey parker wannabe athletes like me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography., 9 Sep 2012
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This review is from: In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography (Paperback)
I enjoyed this book. It was honest and insightful, open and revealling. It seems to be a true AUTObiography and more human for that. You get the feeling that a real person with real goals, hang-ups and passions is telling you his story and that this is an appealing personality who you would enjoy chatting to in the local. And indeed might just to that.
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In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography
In Pursuit of Glory: The Autobiography by Bradley Wiggins (Paperback - 24 Sep 2009)
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