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37 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally Absorbing
I'll get the very few and minor flaws of this book out of the way early on. The hero Arimnestos or Doru (spear) as he is later to become, sails very close, at times, to the 'too good to be true' trap. And the author's preoccupation with the blushes of young girls was a little irritating. However, despite the above I have been the complete prisoner of this book for the...
Published on 19 Aug 2010 by Mr. A. I. Harrison

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Bloodthirsty
Interesting period in history and that is why I bought this book. I didn't like it and will not be reading the next 2 books in the series
Published 17 months ago by John M Myers


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 24 Jun 2012
This review is from: Killer of Men: 1 (Marathon (Orion)) (Paperback)
Stumbled across this book, started reading it, & gotta say I wasn't too impressed to start with.......
It didn't take long before I was hooked though!
I won't give spoilers, but if U like historical fiction and R wondering whether to buy this, stop your dithering!
My fave author is Conn Iggulden, also rate Colleen McCullough, Valerio M Manfredi, William Napier & Simon Scarrow, if U like any of these authors I would recommend this book.
Highly.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Totally Gripping, 14 May 2012
This review is from: Killer of Men (Hardcover)
If you read my book reviews, you will have realised by now that one of my favourite genres is historical fiction especially good yarns about ancient world, Rome, Greece and Briton in particular then when I found the books from Christian Cameron he did disappoint me, I was thrilled by his style of story weaving he is an outstanding weaver of tales about the ancient world.
He is going to become one of the top writers in this specific genre and the ancient era, up there with Conn Iggulden, Bernard Cornwell, and Simon Scarrow.
Anyway this is the first book of a brand new heroic story from the Christian Cameron author of the `Tyrant' series I have sort of written some reviews of the "Tyrant" stories I just have to publish them.
Anyhow to "Killer of Men", Greeks and Persians are poised on the edge of conflict, Arimnestos has been betrayed by his cousin and found himself a slave, and this is his journey out of bondage to seek his revenge.
This story-weaver impressed me with the amount of historical detail, moody battle scenes, and believable characters along with a fast and furious story it's the beginning of another fantastic series of yarns from the ancient world.
Totally gripping, and here is something a little different it is told in the first person as Arimnestos now an old man narrates his life to a daughter, and what a life story to tell, I'm still picturing it in my minds eye!
As I said It's a fast book with lots intrigue and several of the characters have imperfections of character just like in real life, Christian Cameron makes many of Arimnestos' enemies also his friends and some of his allies his enemies just as I would expect it would have been at that time in the ancient world of Greece and Asia, just think of the Spartans and the Greek city states.

For me "Killer of Men" stands out from the crowd and I cannot highly recommend this book enough, if you like historical novels read it, if you like war stories read it, if you like intrigue, romance and an outright rollicking good story then you must read it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unusually awesome, 5 May 2012
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The book was written from a story tellers point of view which if i would have known from the start i may not have bought, however i'm glad i did as it opened my eyes it was thoroughly amazing already started the second one!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars killer of men, 25 Jun 2011
By 
K. Hodgson (noth east england) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Killer of Men: 1 (Marathon (Orion)) (Paperback)
when i bought killer of men i thought i new what i had let my self infor/???? whaT A SHOCK THIS BOOK IS IT IS WELL THOUGHT out story line with some thing for every reader aliitle bot of a love and a load of battle storys ... this is a book i would have no hesitasion in recomending to any body who likes this type of book [reading

KEVIN HODGSON
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cornwell, Iggulden,Scarrow - you have a rival, 21 Mar 2011
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This review is from: Killer of Men (Hardcover)
I am a huge fan of historical novels and devour everything by the likes of Bernard Cornwell, Conn Iggulden, CJ Sansom and Simon Scarrow. When buying my last set of books amazon recommended Killer of Men so I bought it, It was the last book I opened and read, Ogadai, Macro and Cato and Matthew Shardlake had earned their places in my reading list.

There is now a new name at the top of that list Arimnestos.

For some reason the style of writing and the method used to tell the story In Killer of Men immediately resonated with me. I finished the book in two long sittings and can't wait for the next book in the series. It's a fast paced book with lots of twists and turns along the way, many of the characters are have flaws and the author doesn't make the mistake of making all Arimnestos's enemy's bad, in fact many are better people than some of his so called allies.

Several people have mentioned a few flaws in the book, Arimnestos is too good to be true...but wouldn't we all like to be like that! There are several similar names but then again there are 8 people called Mark that go to my local bar...now thats confusing! The author does provide a list of characters and a glossary at the front of the book which reduces the confusion considerably.

If you like historical novels buy it!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A really rivetting Read!, 5 Jan 2011
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Amazon Customer (Surrey, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Killer of Men (Hardcover)
Gives an entirely fresh perspective to Greek historical novels.
Has the glossary where you need it, at the beginning.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Killer of men, 24 July 2014
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Killer of men
To me a normal.reader and lover of ancient history this story is what puts the meat on the bones of other stories its just like being there sitting around a open fire being told of deads done
A true storyteller
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully, believably done..., 24 July 2012
This review is from: Killer of Men: 1 (Marathon (Orion)) (Paperback)
It is the end of 'the long war' - the conflict between Greece and Persia that was one of the crucibles that helped to shape the modern world and modern thought. You are sitting in the afternoon light with some of your friends. One's grandfather sits down at the request of his children and tells the story of his life as you listen. It is quite a life, spanning that crucible period, dealing with those who set the events in motion, shaped them, were destroyed by them.

When the men of Plataea sent Myron to Athens, the storm was still a tower of darkness on the horizon, and we were blinded by our own desires. But the desires of men are nothing when the gods send a storm. The first drops of rain were falling, and only Miltiades knew how big the storm was. And he didn't tell us.

He is an old man, a noble in his home in Thrace. He likes his wine and he likes to tell a good story. He cautions the listeners that his memory may be at fault, but he promises to tell as faithfully as he can all that he saw and did. The story is shaped by the teller, and he is a man of his time - sometimes crude, sometimes heartbreakingly innocent, especially at the first. He faces the truth unflinchingly. He has lived a rough life and done many things that surprise his listeners. He does not apologize, though he understands their uneasiness.

Do we? The narrator is a man of his day, and he speaks to people of his day and age with mindsets far different from ours. He might speak of someone forcing a little slave girl to 'blow his flute', (the man was killed for this) and his granddaughter might blush at this - but this was a society that was closer to matters of life, death and sex than we are at this moment, and the story and the reaction are valid. Who are we to impose our current sensibilities on a story that is trying to be true to the past in which it is set?

'Killer of Men' is a term meaning 'Warrior'. Substitute 'Man of War' or 'Fighter' or 'Champion' and see if it fits better. Arimnestos of Plataea was trained by Calchas, a priest who tended the shrine of a great warrior and a Killer of Men. He was a Killer of Men, himself:

There is a passage, late in the poem, when Achilles is still sulking and Hector rages among the Greeks. And several of the lesser heroes form a line, lock their shields and stop Hector's rush. I remember him singing that whole passage softly... Calchas looked up, into the shaft of light, and his eyes were far away. "That's how it is when the lesser men seek to stop the better. You must lock your shield with your neighbour's, put your head down and refuse to take chances. Let the better man wear himself out against your shield. Poke hard with your spear to keep him art arm's length and refuse to leave the safety of the shield wall." He shrugged. "Pray to the gods that the killer finds other prey, or trips and falls, or that your own killers come and save you."

Arimnestos says "But you were one of the better men." Suddenly his eyes locked with mine and I could see him in his high-crested helm, his strong right arm pounding a lesser man's shield down, until he made the killing cut. I could see it as if I was there. "Yes," he said. "I was a killer of men... I still am. Once you have been there, you can never leave."

Arimnestos was trained to arms and set upon the long, difficult path. The path leads him through warfare - his Plataeans fight off a phalanx of Spartans under King Cleomenes, who gives them the tremendous compliment of asking for a truce to enable them to bury their dead. He studies under the philosopher Heraclitus, he is there to see the event that turns Ephesus against the Persians.

And he fights.

The old man remembers and tells the story as truly as he can, from the beginnings that made him a warrior to his return to the place he lost through another's treachery. He was not a 'mover and shaker' but he went with them, and he watched and listened. He tells his story in the voice of an old man, and it is a good story, well-salted by his thoughts and experience:

Is Achilles really a hero? He's as much of a bitch as Theognis, to my mind. Hector is the hero. And even he would not have made much of a farmer - well, perhaps I do mighty Hector wrong. Given a month of rain, Hector would not surrender or sulk in his barn.

Modern readers seem to want a formula. You don't read "The latest story by George Martin." You read, instead, "The latest George Martin." (I have Josephine Tey - The Daughter of Time - to thank for the illustration). It is not an individual product. It is something put out to fit the perceived wants of a class of readers. Pigeonholes, with the expected pigeons being duly produced to fit into them, safe and secure for the reader's enjoyment. No surprises. If the pigeon does not fit the specific hole we have set for it, if the pigeon is not what we expect, then it is worthless.

This is not a textbook on the Peloponnesian war (although Arimnestos, a historic character, is thought to be one of the sources of the histories by Herodotus - If you look carefully, you will see that he makes several appearances in the story wielding a stylus) nor is it a beginning-to-end account of the fighting as it happens, It is the story of an old man remembering his part in the greatest conflict faced by civilization as he knew it. It is about his telling of his experiences, told as though you are sitting there and listening to him.

If I had my way the Glossary and the Notes on Names would be in the back of the book, before the Acknowledgments. I have no other criticism.

I give this book five stars; it has earned them. Skill, language, character. Arimnestos, it seems, will be telling more stories. I think I will enjoy sitting in the sunset with him, sipping wine and listening to him.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not good enough, 27 Feb 2012
I have to say that I was really disappointed with this book. If you're used to the fantastic writing of Conn Igledonn (sorry about the spelling) or George RR Martin then this will not be good enough. The hero in the book has more lives than a Cheshire cat... Can anyone be THAT lucky?
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6 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Hard work, 1 July 2011
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I will be honest and say that I only managed to read about a quarter of this book so my review isn't based on the whole book. However there was a good reason that I stopped after less than a quarter of the way through.....I was bored!!

I found the writing style awkward, with the story being told to the main characters daughter, with constant and annoying jumps back and forth. The story was slow moving and without any feeling of excitement. I would not recommend this book.
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Killer of Men: 1 (Marathon (Orion))
Killer of Men: 1 (Marathon (Orion)) by Christian Cameron (Paperback - 26 May 2011)
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