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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reality check on childhood, 4 Jan 2008
By 
E. F. Jones (Hampshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In this book Sue Palmer opens up a long denied but disturbing window on childhood in today's Britain. Her major point is that 21st century technology, very beneficial to adults, has created an immensely hostile environment for children.

Her three areas of concern are:

q increasingly aggressive marketing to children
q the effects of the visual media on children's brains
q the abuse of electronic communications

As a retired headteacher she uses her experience and extensive research (see her best seller `Toxic Childhood') together in a reality picture but, most importantly, suggests how change can be put into place.

This very accessible book gives its support for warm, authoritative parenting as well as revealing the `junk food jungle' that leads to toxic eating habits.

As Sue Palmer says at the beginning of the book, "parental love is the greatest force on the planet. When parents know what's good for their children and what does them harm, they will act."
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not scaremongering - a balanced, factual and comes-with-solutions perspective on modern day child rearing, 19 Nov 2012
This review is from: Detoxing Childhood: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Happy, Successful Children: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Bright, Balanced Children (Paperback)
I read Sue Palmer's book with great interest. Being perplexed by my 5 year old nephew's view of the world and having my own concerns about how the vast changes in technology are affecting the world we live in this book really helped me to understand that it wasn't a personal issue but a large scale social problem.

The book is broken down into easy to digest sections. She provides guidance by age group also. Some people may say it's common sense, yet, as her face to face meetings reinforce, it is hard for parents to strike a balance between using technology and being consumed by it.

The basic premise is a need to go back to the more traditional family life and move away from the divisions caused my modern communications and entertainment (email, im, video games, tv) etc. She highlights a need to focus more on what's important and less on the consumerism that has gripped us all. Her tone is more pleading than patronising and she helps justify why parents may have fallen into various traps. Most importantly is her proposed solution and I love the idea of moving from parent competitiveness to parent collaboration. It would be amazing if even small changes could happen as a result of this.

I haven't read her more academic title Toxic Childhood and I'm glad that she has produced a more digestible, readable version for parents. It proves that she has spent the time reviewing and researching her thesis and not simply standing on a soapbox with no grounding for her argument.

If I was to find fault in her approach, when I read the section on the rise of learning difficulties in children and her attributing them to the growth in children watching too much tv, I did raise an eyebrow. Nobody has a definitive answer on why autism, dyslexia or ADHD exist and numerous factors are likely to be at play. This shouldn't detract from the very important message of the book. For our young people to grow up, confident, happy and to thrive they need to feel secure, independent, experience 'real life' activities and to be able to work alongside each other to create a society that includes everyone.

Finally, the section on marketing was shocking. The techniques used to influence young children to ensure they buy x product or support y brand are highly unethical. Her call to ban advertising to under 12's seems entirely just.

It's a wake up call to parents but if headed could make all the diffence to not only your child but the community that they live in too.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars To be read after Toxic Childhood, 24 May 2011
This review is from: Detoxing Childhood: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Happy, Successful Children: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Bright, Balanced Children (Paperback)
After reading Toxic Childhood I found this book very positive and constructive. Sue Palmer's ideas are very helpful. She explains step by step ways to change difficult behaviour in children, most of all it puts the control back into the hands of parents. Her ideas are not an easy option, but frankly I think they are crucial to todays parents trying to bring up responsible and happy children. Well done to Sue Palmer for Toxic Childhood and Detoxing Childhood!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars World at war with innocence, 10 Sep 2008
By 
Caroline Lennox "booksmakemehappy" (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I purchased this book last year after attending a seminar hosted by Sue Palmer in Belfast. Fantastic! Toxic Childhood awakened me to the changes all responsible people should embrace - to make our messy society more child friendly. Innocence needs preserving.
This title, her second book on this theme, gives everyone involved with the nurturing of young minds and bodies some fool proof steps to get rid of the modern day rubbish stealing the joy (and healthiness)from our children. A must for parents and teachers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Family social worker who rates this highly, 30 Mar 2014
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I recommend this book to any parent, who has any concern for the impact that society may be having on their child. All children need love, and your time and attention to become balanced happy individuals; this book supports a collective approach as to how that can be achieved.

Of course by buying the book, you have taken a very positive step in initiating positive change.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good read, 24 May 2013
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This review is from: Detoxing Childhood: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Happy, Successful Children: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Bright, Balanced Children (Paperback)
Sue palmer knows that she is talking about. Good read for parents or parents to-be . Even if u already do a good job parenting this is a reminder of some things for u . Worth a read .
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, 9 Feb 2013
By 
Mrs. S. Colleran (Solihull UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Detoxing Childhood: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Happy, Successful Children: What Parents Need to Know to Raise Bright, Balanced Children (Paperback)
Everyone should read Sue Palmer, a must have for all parents.
Bought as gift to someone who bought an ipad for a 14 month old.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Detoxing Childhood, 18 Dec 2009
An excellent, thought provoking read. What are we doing to today's children? Every adult should read this before having children.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars practical advice for parents, 16 Dec 2008
The key idea that Sue Palmer puts forward in this book is that children need parents who are both warm and firm. Throughout the book she puts forward practical suggestions on how to achieve this balance. She too is warm and firm - encouraging, but not shying away from the extent of the problem, or the role parents need to play in transforming childhood.
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